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Airport

Berlin's Tempelhof Airport: Achieving Redemption Through Adaptive Reuse

09:30 - 29 May, 2018
Berlin's Tempelhof Airport: Achieving Redemption Through Adaptive Reuse, © Danica O. Kus
© Danica O. Kus

The story of Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport never quite ends.

Located just south of the city’s hip Kreuzberg neighborhood and only fifteen minutes by bike from the city center, the disused former Nazi complex—with its terminal, hangars, and massive airfield—occupies nearly 1,000 acres of prime real estate in the ever-growing German capital. In any other metropolis, this land would have been snatched up by a developer years ago, but in Berlin, creative reuse has prevailed over conventional narratives of redevelopment.

© Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus + 24

Heatherwick Reportedly Prevails in Competition for Airport Super-Terminal in Singapore

12:00 - 11 April, 2018
Heatherwick Reportedly Prevails in Competition for Airport Super-Terminal in Singapore, The airport's development plans also include <a href=‘https://www.archdaily.com/575693/safdie-architects-design-glass-air-hub-for-singapore-changi-airport’> Safdie Architects' mixed-use bio-dome</a> pictured here, which will feature <a href=‘https://www.archdaily.com/873144/safdie-architects-changi-airport-will-host-worlds-tallest-indoor-waterfall’> the world’s largest indoor waterfall</a> . Image © Safdie Architects
The airport's development plans also include Safdie Architects' mixed-use bio-dome pictured here, which will feature the world’s largest indoor waterfall . Image © Safdie Architects

Heatherwick Studio is believed to have won an international competition for the design of the new Terminal 5 at Changi Airport, Singapore. Although no formal announcement has been made, The Architects' Journal and BD Online are reporting that a collaboration between Heatherwick and KPF has prevailed against a shortlist containing Grimshaw and SOM. If confirmed, the successful team will be tasked with the design of one of the world’s largest airport terminals.

The Terminal 5 building will accommodate 50 million passengers per year, giving Changi Airport a total capacity of 135 million by the late 2020s. The scheme is being developed within the context of a $1.2 billion expansion programme, which has seen the completion of a Terminal 4 building by Benoy, and a mixed-use “Jewel” biodome by Safdie Architects, pictured above, set to contain the world’s largest indoor waterfall.

When it Comes to Building a Better Airport, "It Never Pays to Use Cheap Materials"

09:30 - 11 April, 2018
When it Comes to Building a Better Airport, "It Never Pays to Use Cheap Materials", Washington Dulles Internation Airport - Main Terminal Expansion. Image © Rick Latoff
Washington Dulles Internation Airport - Main Terminal Expansion. Image © Rick Latoff

Airport design is both an art and a science: the best terminals are not only functional, but also beautiful and awe-inspiring spaces. Millions of people pass through these terminals every day, yet few understand their inner workings as well as Roger Duffy and Derek A.R. Moore—design leaders at SOM who have conceptualized some of the most ambitious aviation projects around the world, including Terminal 2 at Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport in Mumbai. In this interview, Moore, a Director, and Duffy, a Design Partner, reflect on the complicated challenges of airport design, and how these constraints can fuel creative solutions.

Changi International Airport - Terminal 3. Image © Tim Griffith Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport – Terminal 2. Image Courtesy of SOM / Robert Polidori © Mumbai International Airport Pvt. Ltd. Toronto Pearson International Airport Terminal 1. Image © Timothy Hursley Washington Dulles Internation Airport - Automated People Mover Station. Image Courtesy of SOM / © Jeff Goldberg | Esto + 15

Grimshaw to Lead Design of Newark Liberty International Airport Terminal

12:00 - 22 March, 2018
Grimshaw to Lead Design of Newark Liberty International Airport Terminal, Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects
Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects

London-based Grimshaw Architects has been selected to serve as Lead Architect for the design of Newark Liberty International Airport’s new Terminal One building in New Jersey. Grimshaw will work in partnership with STV to design the $1.41 billion terminal, featuring 1 million square feet (93,000 square meters) of space and 33 gates spread across a two-level T-shaped building. The scheme represents the largest transportation infrastructure design-build project in New Jersey’s state history.

Pascall+Watson to Design Stansted Airport’s Transformation

06:00 - 21 March, 2018
Pascall+Watson to Design Stansted Airport’s Transformation, Courtesy of Pascall+Watson
Courtesy of Pascall+Watson

After Pascall+Watson’s success with their concept design for the £130m Arrivals Terminal at Stansted Airport, the firm have been selected for the £600m transformation programme by MAG (Manchester Airports Group owners of Stansted Airport). As demand for air travel continues to increase, Pascall+Watson’s plans aim to provide a greater choice of airlines and destinations by making use of the airport’s spare runway capacity and supporting the future growth. 

Zaha Hadid Architects to Design Navi Mumbai International Airport

12:10 - 14 March, 2018
Zaha Hadid Architects to Design Navi Mumbai International Airport, Previous airport works by Zaha Hadid Architects include the Beijing Daxing International Airport, slated as the world's largest airport terminal. Image Image by Methanoia © Zaha Hadid Architects
Previous airport works by Zaha Hadid Architects include the Beijing Daxing International Airport, slated as the world's largest airport terminal. Image Image by Methanoia © Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has won an international competition for the design of the Navi Mumbai International Airport (NMIA). A long-awaited infrastructural project for India’s largest city, the scheme addresses capacity issues for the existing Chhatrapati Shivaji International (CSI) Airport, which features a terminal designed by SOM.

ZHA’s brief will encompass the design and execution of new NMIA terminal building, an Air Traffic Control Tower, and associated access. The airport will be situated across Mumbai Harbor, connected to the city by a planned rail link, and access to national rail networks. ZHA's previous work in the airport sector includes the Beijing Daxing International Airport (pictured), which is slated to be the world's largest airport terminal.

Electric Planes and Driverless Cars: Plans Unveiled for World's First Energy-Positive City Airport

14:00 - 8 March, 2018
Electric Planes and Driverless Cars: Plans Unveiled for World's First Energy-Positive City Airport, Courtesy of Forbes Massie
Courtesy of Forbes Massie

In an era defined by globalization, and ‘speed-driven economies,’ urban environments are becoming more entwined with airports, giving rise to an architectural phenomenon of the ‘Aerotropolis’ across the world. In OsloNorwegian firms Haptic Architects and Nordic Office of Architecture have aimed higher, seeking to design the world’s first energy-positive airport city for the Norwegian capital.

Courtesy of Forbes Massie Courtesy of Haptic Architects Courtesy of Forbes Massie Courtesy of Forbes Massie + 9

Georgia's Kutaisi Airport Taps UNStudio for Terracing Expansion Just 4 Years After its Opening

12:00 - 27 November, 2017

Less than five years after the opening of Georgia’s Kutaisi ‘King David the Builder’ International Airport, rapidly increasing usage (from 12,915 passengers a year in 2012 to more than 300,000 in 2016) has prompted the airport to begin plans for an expansion that could serve as many as 1,000,000 passengers by 2020.

To achieve these goals, the airport has returned to the architects who designed the original structure, UNStudio (with local architects Artstudio Project), to develop a unique airport concept featuring terraced waiting areas and a rooftop viewing garden.

© VA-render © VA-render © VA-render Photo of the existing Kutaisi ‘King David the Builder’ International Airport / UNStudio. Image © Nakani Mamasakhlisi + 9

Foster + Partners Selected to Design Marseille Airport Extension

12:00 - 24 November, 2017
Foster + Partners Selected to Design Marseille Airport Extension, Courtesy of Foster + Partners
Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Foster + Partners has won the competition to design a new extension to Marseille Airport that will allow the building to process up to 12 million passengers a year. The 2-phase design will add a new central pavilion to the existing building—which comprises the original 1960s structure designed by Fernand Pouillon, and a 1992 extension by Richard Rogers—and a new pier to provide access to the planes.

KAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

08:00 - 17 September, 2017
KAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, © Filippo Bolognese
© Filippo Bolognese

Netherlands-based architectural firm KAAN Architecten, in partnership with ABT, Estudio Lamela and Ineco has been selected to design the new Amsterdam Airport Schiphol Terminal, with the help of Arnout Meijer Studio, DGMR and Planeground. Soon to be located south of Schiphol Plaza, at Jan Dellaert Plein, the new 100,500-square-metre terminal will implement futuristic and sustainable design trends.

© Filippo Bolognese © Filippo Bolognese © Beauty & The Bit © Beauty & The Bit + 13

Paul Andreu: "I Would Only Take On a Project if the Ideas Were Mine. Otherwise, I Am Not Interested."

09:30 - 7 March, 2017
Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974. Image © Paul Maurer
Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974. Image © Paul Maurer

For 40 years, Paul Andreu was among the world's foremost airport design experts. Reflecting on this before the turn of the millennium, he stated that architectural historians of the future might consider the 1990s as “the age of the air terminal.” But shortly after this, he left the arena of airport design to focus on other large projects, many of them in China. In this interview, the latest of Vladimir Belogolovsky's “City of Ideas” series, Andreu explains why he made the switch and shares his thoughts on how good architecture is made—saying it often depends more on what you don't tell your client than what you do.

Paul Andreu: Before we start, I must explain something. I am an architect and engineer. For a long time I was not an independent architect but worked at and then was the head of airport works at Aéroports de Paris Ingénierie or ADPi, a subsidiary of Aéroports de Paris (ADP). This public establishment is not only in charge of the planning, design, and operation of three Paris-region airports, but is also involved in airport works all around the world, as well as other large-scale architectural projects. First, we did airports in France, then in the Middle East and Africa, then in China and all over Asia, and then we developed projects in other parts of the world. Most of the time we developed our projects from concept all the way through construction; although once we did just the concept for Kansai airport on a specially built island in the Bay of Osaka. As you know, it was designed by Renzo Piano and I consulted for him on function and circulation aspects.

Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal II, modules A & B, Paris, 1972-1982. Image © Labo ADP Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal II, modules A & B, Paris, 1972-1982. Image © Labo ADP New airport of Jakarta, Sukarno-Hatta, Indonesia, 1977-1985. Image © Labo ADP National Centre for the Performing Arts (Opéra de Pékin), Beijing, China, 1999-2007. Image © Paul Maurer + 69

Considering the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow

04:00 - 19 January, 2017
Considering the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow, Courtesy of Aerial Futures
Courtesy of Aerial Futures

Aerial Futures, Grounded Visions: Shaping the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow was a two-day symposium held in October 2016 as part of the European Cultural Center's collateral event at the 2016 Venice Biennale. It encouraged discussion about the future of air travel from the perspectives of architecture, design, technology, culture and user experience. The event featured presentations and discussions by the likes of airport architect Curtis FentressNelly Ben YahounDonald Albrecht, Director of the Museum of the City of New York; Anna Gasco, post-doctoral researcher at the ETH-Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore; Jonathan Ledgard, co-founder of the Droneport Project; and Ashok Raiji, Principal at Arup New York.

Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures + 4

New York Plans $10 Billion Renovation of JFK Airport

14:20 - 6 January, 2017
New York Plans $10 Billion Renovation of JFK Airport, Courtesy of State of New York
Courtesy of State of New York

New York City’s busiest airport is about to receive a major overhaul.

Proposed by New York governor Andrew Cuomo, the plan calls for a $10 billion renovation to New York City’s busiest airport, transforming the facility into a “a unified, interconnected, world-class’ complex.”

Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York + 5

Aedas Wins Two International Competitions to Design Airports in Shenzhen and Hong Kong

16:00 - 23 November, 2016
Aedas Wins Two International Competitions to Design Airports in Shenzhen and Hong Kong, Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse, China, by Aedas. Image Courtesy of Aedas
Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse, China, by Aedas. Image Courtesy of Aedas

Aedas have recently won two international competitions to design international airport buildings: the Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse and Hong Kong International Airport Third Runway Passenger Building.

In recent years, Aedas have emerged as a leader in airport design, as they are also currently working on the Hong Kong International Airport Terminal 2 Expansion, and have previously worked on Hong Kong International Airport Midfield Concourse and North Satellite Concourse. With the two newly-won projects, Aedas hopes to reinforce their strength and growing influence in airport design.

Aerial Futures: Grounded Visions for the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow

09:30 - 11 October, 2016
Aerial Futures: Grounded Visions for the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

The Aerial Futures symposium explores the current state of airport design and the future of this rapidly evolving architectural typology. The symposium brings thinkers and practitioners to Venice for two days, and is open to the general public.

Bird-Shaped Ashgabat Airport Spreads its Wings in Turkmenistan

16:10 - 23 September, 2016

Designing airports based on flight-inspired, aerodynamic forms is nothing new – in fact, that has been the concept behind some of history’s most beautiful airport terminals, such as Eero Saarinen’s iconic TWA Terminal in New York. But until now, no airport building has been quite so literal with its symbolism as the recently unveiled Ashgabat International Airport.

The new terminal building in Turkmenistan's capital takes the form of a soaring falcon, echoing the mascot of the national airline carrier. And at a cost of $2.3 billion USD, the structure has already drummed up some controversy – critics claim the building is much larger than needed to handle the country’s relative low traffic rates.

See some images of the bird-shaped building below.

Shenyang Taoxian International Airport Terminal 3 / CNADRI

19:00 - 11 August, 2016
Shenyang Taoxian International Airport Terminal 3 / CNADRI, Courtesy of CNADRI
Courtesy of CNADRI

Courtesy of CNADRI Courtesy of CNADRI Courtesy of CNADRI Courtesy of CNADRI + 14

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

03:00 - 13 June, 2016
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock + 26