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Africa: The Latest Architecture and News

Kéré Architecture Proposes New Design for Benin's National Assembly in Porto-Novo

Kéré Architecture has unveiled first images of its proposal for the Benin National Assembly. Located in Porto-Novo, in the Republic of Benin, the Parliament House has been commissioned by the Ministry of Living Environment and Sustainable Development, and has been in the design phase from 2018 till 2020. Portraying the values of democracy and the cultural identity of the citizens, the project is set for construction in March 2021.

Courtesy of Kéré ArchitectureCourtesy of Kéré ArchitectureCourtesy of Kéré ArchitectureCourtesy of Kéré Architecture+ 21

Living in Dakar, A Study of Senegalese Housing & Future Development

Launched by the Goethe Institut, Habiter Dakar (Living in Dakar) is a virtual exhibition tackling Housing in the Senegalese capital. The study was led by Nzinga Mboup and Caroline Geffriaud, both Architects based in Dakar. They noticed that the current housing offer in the city was particularly far off the needs of its inhabitants, whether on the cultural, societal or environmental level.

The architects analyzed the progression through which the Senegalese capital's Urban Landscape and Housing development had passed, starting from the traditional compound living type to today’s international housing models which seem to be disconnected from the daily reality of most of the city’s inhabitants. The study is concentrated on Housing which is an essential part of the formation and evolution of Dakar and suggests important theoretical and concrete reflections for the future development of the African metropolis.

Decline of the SICAP and SNHLM (national agencies) and rise of private developers. . Image Courtesy of Moustapha MbengueBubble House by Wallace Neff . Image Courtesy of Jeffrey HeadProtection of the sacred _ Planting as many sacred trees and maximizing their chances of survival.. Image Courtesy of Eric RossThe ELEMENTAL Method _ Post move-in modifications. . Image Courtesy of ELEMENTAL+ 29

Cities on the Move: What the Experts Predict for the Future of Urban Mobility

In our increasingly urbanized world, everything and everyone has adopted a lifestyle of nomadism. New environmental and social constraints have forced people to have a constant "on-the-go" behavior, so much so that almost everything has acquired wheels, even the buildings. But with the rise of debates like "is humankind being replaced by robots?" and "is technology taking over?", urban mobility has helped give access to housing, healthcare, and education in places with extreme difficult conditions.

To shed the light on globally-thriving mobile activities, the France-based Institut pour Ville en Mouvement, or City on the Move Institute, is an organization that has been addressing the challenges posed by urban mobility and contributing to the emergence of innovative solutions. In a series of short Youtube clips, the organization invited experts in the fields of architecture, urban planning, and technology to share their insights on the future of urban mobility.

Adjaye Associates Designs the Thabo Mbeki Presidential Library in Johannesburg, South Africa

Adjaye Associates has unveiled its design for a new historical center for African consciousness, the Thabo Mbeki Presidential Library in Johannesburg. Named after the previous president of South Africa, the project is an opportunity to realize the dreams of Thabo Mbeki to advance and empower an African renaissance, according to the 2021 RIBA Royal Gold Medal winner Sir David Adjaye.

Courtesy of Adjaye AssociatesCourtesy of Adjaye AssociatesCourtesy of Adjaye AssociatesCourtesy of Adjaye Associates+ 11

Spatial Education and the Future of African Cities: An Interview with Matri-Archi

Led by architectural designers Khensani de Klerk and Solange Mbanefo, Matri-Archi is a collective based between Switzerland and South Africa that aims to bring African women together for the development of spatial education in African cities. Through design practice, writing, podcasts, and other initiatives, Matri-Archi focuses on the recognition and empowerment of women in the spatial field and architectural industry.

ArchDaily had the opportunity to talk to the co-directors of the collective on hegemonic space, informal architecture, technology, local idiosyncrasies, and the future of African and global cities. Read the full interview below.

Adjaye Associates Reveals Preliminary Design for Edo Museum of West African Art in Nigeria

Adjaye Associates unveiled its design for the Edo Museum of West African Art (EMOWAA). Investigating the archaeology of the Kingdom of Benin, including buried remains below the site, the EMOWAA Archaeology Project is set to start in 2021, involving the Legacy Restoration Trust (LRT) and the British Museum with the local communities, the Benin Royal Court, the Government of Edo State, and the National Commission for Museums and Monuments (NCMM).

Courtesy of Adjaye AssociatesCourtesy of Adjaye AssociatesCourtesy of Adjaye AssociatesCourtesy of Adjaye Associates+ 11

Public Protests and the Urban Legacies of Colonialism and Military Dictatorship in Nigeria

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

For the past two weeks, cities across Nigeria were hit by protests against the notorious Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), a police unit setup in 1992 to fight armed robberies. The anti-SARS protesters are calling for the unit’s disbandment, due to its high-handedness, extra-judicial killings, extortion, and numerous human rights abuses.

Tragically, the protests came to a brutal climax on October 20, with the shooting of protesters at the Lekki Tollgate by gunmen believed to be agents of the Nigerian state. This led to casualties, which are currently a subject of controversy: the Lagos State government concedes that two persons lost their lives; groups like Amnesty International insist the figures are much higher.

The Pursuit of an Identity for Angolan Architecture: Interview with Grupo BANGA

Investing in virtual projects has probably never been more timely, after all, we have been partially deprived of contact with the concrete world. Exploring the singularities of the present moment and the power of online engagement, a group of architects from Angola started an ambitious work: pursuing a new identity for Angolan architecture.

Formed by Yolana Lemos, Kátia Mendes, Mamona Duca, Elsimar de Freitas, and Gilson Menses, Grupo BANGA is responsible for the project Cabana de Arte (Art Hut), which combines the efforts of young architects and artists from Angola in virtual works that seek to bring visibility to emerging professionals and bring architecture closer to people's daily lives.

Projeto arquitetônico virtual para a exposição "Tchitundu-Hulu, a história resgatada". Image Cortesia de Grupo BANGAPlanta do projeto para a exposição "Mfwanana, Dialetos da Terra". Image Cortesia de Grupo BANGAProjeto arquitetônico virtual para a exposição "Eu sou o sol - as marcas perpetuadas em mim". Image Cortesia de Grupo BANGAProjeto investigativo "O Soba tem algo para dizer / O Soba vai à comunidade". Image Cortesia de Grupo BANGA+ 8

Letter From Nigeria: Coronavirus and the African City

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Since the outbreak of Covid-19, I, like most of the world, have spent the last few months quarantined at home, perturbed and uncertain about the ramifications of it all. I will spare you my predictions for the Post-Pandemic Future of the African City (there’s presently no shortage of those), but instead, I want to offer up some observations about our current situation. As an African, my perspective is both unique to our continent and universal to everyone. It is, afterall, a global pandemic. 

Kaira Looro Competition Announces Results of its 2020 Edition

The Kaira Looro Architecture Competition to support humanitarian projects has released its full list of winning projects for an Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) in Sub-Saharan Africa. The contest, already in its 4th edition, aims to raise awareness among the international community about emergencies in developing countries, and support humanitarian projects in Africa.

Obafemi Awolowo University: A Look at Africa's Most Beautiful Campus

The Library 1966. Image Courtesy of The Arieh Sharon Digital ArchiveThe Campus . Image Courtesy of The Arieh Sharon Digital ArchiveThe Secretariat 1968. Image Courtesy of The Arieh Sharon Digital ArchiveThe Assembly Hall 1970 . Image Courtesy of The Arieh Sharon Digital Archive+ 7

From academic institutes in North America to residential projects in the Middle East, the various disciplines of Bauhaus and its influence on architecture and design are noticeably present in projects all over the world. While most projects acquired the school's universal language, a few unique ones combined Bauhaus' theory and design principles with the site's cultural and climatic specificity.

This article is a collaboration between ArchDaily and the Arieh Sharon Org. All historical images were shared by the organization.

African House Design Competition - A Home For The Jorejick Family

Tanzania suffers from a terrible shortage of good quality and affordable housing. So dire is this shortage that the nation currently carries a 3 million housing deficit coupled with a 200.000 unit annual demand. Over seventy percent of its urban residents live in unplanned and unserviced informal settlements.

With that in mind, Archstorming is looking for a housing design to be implemented not only in Tanzania, but also in other African countries where housing is an increasing problem.

​In order to do so, the current competition will explore efficient and economic ways to build houses in Africa. The Jorejick family, located near

Contemporary Mozambique: 4 Projects that Respond to Present Challenges

After centuries of Portuguese colonization and recent conquest of independence, Mozambique has undergone a difficult period with new challenges, such as the combat against poverty, the infrastructure deficit, and uncontrolled urban expansion. On the architecture field, it is possible to notice the impact of these challenges on the evolution of the Mozambican projects. Some examples are: the prediction of the need to expand the building in the future, the adoption of climate control passive measures and the utilization of vernacular constructive techniques adapted to the local context (as a way to minimize energy consumption in the different phases of building construction and its respective costs).

Rural Frameworks: Ghana's New Spaces for Learning

Ghana's architecture has long been tied to local building materials. From traditional thatch roofs and mud walls to contemporary concrete and glass structures, the country's built environment is a refection of the surrounding context. This is true for urban and rural projects alike, and as new educational buildings are created across Ghana, these spaces reflect the country's landscape as they look to the future of learning.

Courtesy of Maude Cannat, Rachel Méau, Steve Santos© Anna Schweiger© Andrea TabocchiniCourtesy of Irene Librando, Nadia Peruggi, Lucile Bitz, Antonella Mennella+ 7