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Washington Dc: The Latest Architecture and News

Rockwell Group's LAB Creates a "Lawn" for the National Building Museum

05:00 - 11 July, 2019
Rockwell Group's LAB Creates a "Lawn" for the National Building Museum, LAWN. Image © Timothy Schenck
LAWN. Image © Timothy Schenck

The LAB at Rockwell Group has partnered with The National Building Museum to present the 2019 Summer Block Party installation LAWN. Designed to be an immersive installation taking up the entirety of the Museum’s Great Hall, the project presents a series of interactive experiences for all ages. The lawn itself is programmed with summer entertainment and activities, including movie nights, yoga, and meditation. By creating custom software, the LAB also developed an Augmented Reality game alongside the installation.

LAWN. Image © Timothy Schenck LAWN. Image © Timothy Schenck LAWN. Image © Timothy Schenck LAWN. Image © Timothy Schenck + 7

International Spy Museum / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

17:00 - 24 May, 2019
International Spy Museum / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, © Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

© Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux + 44

  • Architects

  • Location

    Washington D.C., District of Columbia, United States
  • Category

  • Architect/Lead Designer

    Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
  • Area

    140000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2019
  • Photographs

Rockwell Group's "Lawn" to Open at the National Building Museum this Summer

13:00 - 2 May, 2019
Rockwell Group's "Lawn" to Open at the National Building Museum this Summer, Lawn. Image Courtesy of National Building Museum
Lawn. Image Courtesy of National Building Museum

The LAB at Rockwell Group has partnered with The National Building Museum to present the 2019 Summer Block Party installation Lawn. Designed to be an immersive installation taking up the entirety of the Museum’s Great Hall, the project will present interactive experiences for all ages. The lawn itself will be programmed and activated throughout the day with summer entertainment and activities, including movie nights, yoga, and meditation. By creating custom software, the LAB has also developed an Augmented Reality game alongside the installation.

Hiroshi Sugimoto Designs New Sculpture Garden for the Hirshhorn Museum

13:00 - 14 March, 2019
Hiroshi Sugimoto Designs New Sculpture Garden for the Hirshhorn Museum, Existing Sculpture Garden. Image Courtesy of Hirshhorn Museum
Existing Sculpture Garden. Image Courtesy of Hirshhorn Museum

The Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum sculpture garden will be renovated for the first time since the 1980s by Japanese artist and architect Hiroshi Sugimoto. Currently featuring works by Auguste Rodin, Jimmie Durham, and Yoko Ono, the sculpture garden will be opened up to the National Mall and create space for large-scale contemporary works and performances. The new concept aims to raise visibility for the garden and welcome more visitors to the museum.

4 Mega Bridges that were Never Built

11:00 - 25 January, 2019
4 Mega Bridges that were Never Built, EuroRoute Bridge, between Britain and France. Image Courtesy of 911Metallurgist
EuroRoute Bridge, between Britain and France. Image Courtesy of 911Metallurgist

2019 has already witnessed a series of bridge-related milestones marked, from the world’s longest bridge nearing completion in Kuwait to the world’s largest 3D-printed concrete bridge being completed in Shanghai. As we remain fixated on the future-driven, record-breaking accomplishments of realized bridge design, "911 Metallurgist” has chosen to look back in history on some of the visionary ideas for bridges which never saw the light of day.

Whether stopped in their tracks by finance, planning, or engineering difficulties, the four bridge designs listed below embody a marriage of art and engineering too advanced for their time. From a proposal for a EuroRoute Bridge between Britain and France, to a 12-rail, 24-lane bridge across the Huston River in New York, all four designs share a common, ambitious, yet doomed vision of crossing the great divide from pen and paper to bricks and mortar.

Salt and Pepper House / Kube Architecture

16:00 - 11 October, 2018
Salt and Pepper House / Kube Architecture, © Greg Powers
© Greg Powers

© Greg Powers © Greg Powers © Greg Powers © Greg Powers + 28

  • Architects

  • Location

    Washington D. C., United States
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Richard Loosle Ortega, Janet Bloomberg
  • Area

    2500.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Fentress Designs Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. as a Homage to National History

09:00 - 5 October, 2018
Fentress Designs Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. as a Homage to National History, Courtesy of Fentress Architects
Courtesy of Fentress Architects

Fentress Architects has revealed their design for the expansion of the Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. A prominent new addition to the embassy’s Washington D.C. campus. The scheme expands the architectural language of the existing embassy buildings, embracing contemporary design techniques within the context of traditional bureaucratic architecture.

Fentress’ design integrates materials of Norwegian cultural significance as prominent features of the façade. The use of Norwegian spruce timber, Oppdal stone, and patinated copper pay homage to the country’s traditions in shipbuilding and woodworking, as well as their abundance of natural resources.

Snarkitecture's "Fun House" Opens at the National Building Museum in Washington DC

14:00 - 6 July, 2018
Snarkitecture's "Fun House" Opens at the National Building Museum in Washington DC, © Noah Kalina
© Noah Kalina

Snarkitecture’s “Fun House” has opened at the National Building Museum in Washington DC, an interactive exhibition forming part of the museum’s Summer Block Party series of temporary structures created inside its historic Great Hall.

More than 1500 people visited Fun House at its July 4th opening day, which comes three years after Snarkitecture’s installation at the 2015 Summer Block Party, titled "The BEACH." Other noted collaborations for Summer Block Party include Studio Gang in 2017, James Corner Field Operations in 2016, and Bjarke Ingels Group in 2014.

© Noah Kalina © Noah Kalina © Noah Kalina © Noah Kalina + 14

The Architecture of Washington DC's Watergate Complex: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address

09:30 - 1 March, 2018
The Architecture of Washington DC's Watergate Complex: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address, Courtesy of Joe Rodota
Courtesy of Joe Rodota

Joseph Rodota's new book The Watergate: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address (William Morrow) presents the story of a building complex whose name is recognized around the world as the address at the center of the United States' greatest political scandal—but one that has so many more tales to tell. In this excerpt from the book, the author looks into the design and construction of a building The Washington Post once called a "glittering Potomac Titanic," a description granted because the Watergate was ahead of its time, filled with boldface names—and ultimately doomed.

On the evening of October 25, 1965, the grand opening of the Watergate was held for fifteen-hundred guests. Luigi Moretti, the architect, flew in from Rome. Other executives came from Mexico, where the Watergate developer, the Italian real estate giant known as Societa Generale Immobiliare, was planning a community outside Mexico City, and from Montreal, where the company was erecting the tallest concrete-and-steel skyscraper in Canada, designed by Moretti and another Italian, Pier Luigi Nervi.

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History Wins 2017 Design of the Year

10:05 - 26 January, 2018
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History Wins 2017 Design of the Year, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. / Adjaye Associates, The Freelon Group, Davis Brody Bond, SmithGroupJJR for the Smithsonian Institution. Image Courtesy of The Design Museum in London
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. / Adjaye Associates, The Freelon Group, Davis Brody Bond, SmithGroupJJR for the Smithsonian Institution. Image Courtesy of The Design Museum in London

Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup’s Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. has been selected as the winner of the Beazley Design of the Year for 2017.

Presented by the Design Museum in London, the award is given to the project that best meets the criteria of design that “promotes or delivers change, enables access, extends design practice or captures the spirit of the year.”

See more from the overall winner and each of the category winners, below.

Fine Arts Commission on BIG's Smithsonian Plans: "It's Not Good Design"

16:00 - 25 January, 2018
Fine Arts Commission on BIG's Smithsonian Plans: "It's Not Good Design", Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual
Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual

Despite 3 years of community input and redesign, BIG’s plans for the new Smithsonian Institution Campus Master Plan in Washington, D.C., has been met with skepticism from the Commission of Fine Arts, one of the two federal agencies charged with approving the plan.

Classical Architecture and Monuments of Washington, D.C.: A History & Guide

19:00 - 23 January, 2018
Classical Architecture and Monuments of Washington, D.C.: A History & Guide

Classical design formed our nation's capital. The soaring Washington Monument, the columns of the Lincoln Memorial, and the spectacular dome of the Capitol Building speak to the founders' comprehensive vision of our federal city. Learn about the L'Enfant and McMillan plans for Washington, D.C., and how those designs are reflected in two hundred years of monuments, museums, and representative government. View the statues of our Founding Fathers with the eye of a sculptor and gain insight into the criticism and controversies of modern additions to Washington's monumental structure. Author Michael Curtis guides this tour of the heart of the District

BIG Reveals Updated Vision for Smithsonian Campus Master Plan Scheme

15:25 - 19 January, 2018
Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual
Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual

BIG has unveiled an updated vision for the new Campus Master Plan for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., after taking into account over 3 years of community input and collaboration with the storied museum and research institution. The revised proposal pays particular attention to the preservation of unique character of the Enid A. Haupt Garden while still addressing the existing and future needs of the Smithsonian at one of the nation’s most historically significant sites.

Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual Courtesy of BIG. Rendering by Brick Visual + 9

The Arc de Triomphe as an Elephant?! These Illustrations Reveal What Famous Monuments Could Have Been

08:00 - 15 January, 2018
The Arc de Triomphe as an Elephant?! These Illustrations Reveal What Famous Monuments Could Have Been, Courtesy of GoCompare
Courtesy of GoCompare

A city’s monuments are integral parts of its metropolitan identity. They stand proud and tall and are often the subject of a few of your vacation photos. It is their form and design which makes them instantly recognizable, but what if their design had turned out differently?

Paris’ iconic and stunning Arc de Triomphe could have been a giant elephant, large enough to hold banquets and balls, and the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. could have featured an impressive pyramid.

GoCompare has compiled and illustrated a series of rejected designs for monuments and placed them in a modern context to commemorate what could have been. Here are a few of our favorites:

Amazon HQ2: Study by Data Science Experts Names Washington DC as Ideal Host City

07:30 - 7 November, 2017
Amazon HQ2: Study by Data Science Experts Names Washington DC as Ideal Host City, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/joebehr/37039556922/'>Flickr user joebehr</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
© Flickr user joebehr licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Amazon’s open call for bids for its new headquarters, HQ2, closed last month, but in the months leading up to the final decision in 2018, analysts will continue to flood the internet with detailed studies evaluating who they believe should be the winner. In other words, the mirror-mirror-on-the-wall game for cities is just starting to warm up.

Earlier, ArchDaily reported on the data-driven approach adopted by Moody’s Analytics which projected Austin, TX as the winner. But another study by IT education company Thinkful now points towards Washington DC as the city most likely to make the cut. So what makes Washington DC the fairest of them all? Read on to see how data science techniques helped analysts at Thinkful with this prediction, what kind of approach they adopted, and how it differed from that of Moody’s Analytics.

Construction Begins on Frank Gehry's Eisenhower Memorial in Washington DC

15:06 - 3 November, 2017
Construction Begins on Frank Gehry's Eisenhower Memorial in Washington DC, © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission
© Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission

The Frank Gehry-designed Eisenhower Memorial has finally broken ground in Washington DC following a tumultuous years-long approval process.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held yesterday at the National Mall site, located at the intersection of Maryland and Independence Avenues and across from the National Air and Space Museum.

© Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission © Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission + 4

Washington D.C. Unveils Its Largest Ever Construction Project: $441 Million Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge Replacement

14:15 - 16 August, 2017
Washington D.C. Unveils Its Largest Ever Construction Project: $441 Million Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge Replacement, Courtesy of DDOT
Courtesy of DDOT

Washington, D.C. has unveiled the design of the city’s largest ever construction project: a $411 million bridge spanning the Anacostia River that will replace the 68-year-old Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge. The project will be carried out by the team known as “South Capitol Bridge Builders,” consisting of lead designer AECOM, Archer Western Construction and Granite Construction, after their submission was selected as the winner of a competition for the bridge announced in 2014.

Courtesy of DDOT Courtesy of DDOT Courtesy of DDOT Courtesy of DDOT + 4

The Real Reason For the Resurgence of Streetcars in America (Spoiler: It's Not for Transport)

09:30 - 12 August, 2017

In this six-minute-long video, Vox makes the argument that the primary reason behind the recent resurgence of streetcar systems—or proposals for streetcars, at least—in the USA is not because of their contributions to urban mobility, but instead because of the fact that they drive and sustain economic development. As it uncovers the causes for the popular failure of the streetcar systems in cities such as Washington DC, Atlanta, and Salt Lake City (low speed and limited connectivity, mostly) it asks why an increasing number of American city governments are pushing for streetcars in spite of their dismal record at improving transit. Is it solely due to their positively modern aesthetic? Are streetcars destined to function as mere “attractions” in a city’s urban landscape? Or is the real objective something more complex?