1. ArchDaily
  2. Global South

Global South: The Latest Architecture and News

The Use of Indigenous and Locally Sourced Materials in Philippines Architecture

The Philippines' history and cultural background are continually reflected in the architectural landscape throughout the country, with its structures and dwellings harboring a handful of influences from the nations that once purveyed the island.

When we talk about the topic of Filipino architecture and dwellings, more often than not, we may think of the first known Filipino home: Bahay Kubo. The Bahay Kubo is a small hut comprising nipa, bamboo, and other indigenous materials. It is often times that many citizens still choose to adopt this style of habitation, however, over time, the concept of the nipa hut has evolved into a more modern structure.

The Use of Indigenous and Locally Sourced Materials in Philippines Architecture - Image 1 of 4The Use of Indigenous and Locally Sourced Materials in Philippines Architecture - Image 2 of 4The Use of Indigenous and Locally Sourced Materials in Philippines Architecture - Image 3 of 4The Use of Indigenous and Locally Sourced Materials in Philippines Architecture - Image 4 of 4The Use of Indigenous and Locally Sourced Materials in Philippines Architecture - More Images+ 8

What Role Should Architectural Prototypes Play in the Global South?

It’s an essential component of the design process, where spatial ideations are translated into built form – the design of the prototype. Architectural projects, throughout history and in contemporary practice, have been prototyped to carry out both technical and aesthetic tests, where further insight is gained into the integrity of the design. It’s the blurred line between the experimental and the practical.

What Role Should Architectural Prototypes Play in the Global South? - Imagen 1 de 4What Role Should Architectural Prototypes Play in the Global South? - Imagen 2 de 4What Role Should Architectural Prototypes Play in the Global South? - Imagen 3 de 4What Role Should Architectural Prototypes Play in the Global South? - Imagen 4 de 4What Role Should Architectural Prototypes Play in the Global South? - More Images+ 6

How Will We Live With Livestock?

As populations continue to migrate from rural to urban areas, space is at a premium. Many settlements are becoming ever-more congested – with adequate, affordable housing in short supply and transport systems struggling to serve their respective residents. But as much the conversation about urbanization is about people, it is sometimes also about the animals that come with those people – urban livestock that play a key role at providing sustenance on an individual level, in addition to becoming an avenue for communal trade.

How Will We Live With Livestock? - Image 1 of 4How Will We Live With Livestock? - Image 2 of 4How Will We Live With Livestock? - Image 3 of 4How Will We Live With Livestock? - Image 4 of 4How Will We Live With Livestock? - More Images+ 4

The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India

An ancient Indian folktale narrates the story of a demigod, Hiranyakashipu, who was granted a boon of indestructibility. He wished for his death to never be brought about by any weapon, human or animal, not at day or night, and neither inside nor outside his residence. To cease his wrathful ways, Lord Vishnu took the form of a half-human-half-animal to slay the demigod at twilight at the threshold of his house.

Threshold architectural spaces have always held deep cultural meaning to the people of India. In-between spaces are found in the midst of daily activities as courtyards, stairways, and verandas. The entrance to the house is revered by Indians of all social backgrounds. Throughout the country’s varied landscape, transitional entry spaces are flanked by distinctive front verandas that merge the street with the house.

The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India  - Image 1 of 4The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India  - Image 2 of 4The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India  - Image 3 of 4The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India  - Image 4 of 4The Veranda: A Disappearing Threshold Space in India  - More Images+ 1

A Remarkably Comprehensive New Guide to the Architecture of Sub-Saharan Africa

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Compared to that of the West and East, awareness and knowledge of the architecture of sub-Saharan Africa—Africa south of the Sahara Desert—is scant. A new book intends to mitigate this oversight, and it’s a significant accomplishment. Architectural Guide Sub-Saharan Africa (DOM publishers, 2021), edited by Philipp Meuser, Adil Dalbai, and Livingstone Mukasa, was more than six years in the making. The seven-volume guide presents architecture in the continent’s 49 sub-Saharan nation-states, includes contributions by nearly 340 authors, 5,000 photos, more than 850 buildings, and 49 articles expressly devoted to theorizing African architecture in its social, economic, historical, and cultural context. I interviewed two of the editors—Adil Dalbai, an architectural researcher and practitioner specializing in sub-Saharan Africa, and Livingstone Mukasa, a native Ugandan architect interested in the intersections of architectural history and cultural anthropology—about the challenges of creating the guide, some of its revelations about the architecture of Africa, and its potential impact.

Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize?

Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize? - Image 1 of 4
Francis Kéré, 2022 Pritzker Prize Laureate . Image © Lars Borges

Last Tuesday, March 15, Francis Kéré became the first African architect to win the Pritzker Prize, the most important award in the architecture discipline.

The election of Kéré is not only symbolic in a time of identity demands, where the institutions that make up the mainstream are required to more faithfully represent the social, cultural, and sexual realities that make up our societies, but it also confirms the recent approach of the Pritzker Prize jury.

Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize? - Image 2 of 4Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize? - Image 3 of 4Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize? - Image 5 of 4Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize? - Image 6 of 4Why Francis Kéré Won the Pritzker Prize? - More Images+ 3

Social Urbanism: From the Medellín Model to a New Global Movement

Social Urbanism: Reframing Spatial Design – Discourses from Latin America, a new book by Maria Bellalta, ASLA, dean of the School of Landscape Architecture at the Boston Architectural College, is a welcome addition to the growing number of publications on the social justice-oriented form of urbanism, architecture, and public space emanating from Medellín and Colombia. The achievements of social urbanism have rightfully become synonymous with Medellín in the world of landscape architecture, urban planning and design, and architecture.

Putucos: What A Indigenous Technique Can Tell Us About Sustainability

As a part of the XV Taller Social Latinoamericano architectural conference that took place in Puno, Peru, we visited the Iruito Tupi zone in Huancané province alongside Francisco Mariscal, Director of the Puno Cultural Center. For the conference, Mariscal gave a presentation on the history of putucos, pre-Columbian houses made with a mixture of earth and grass.

History has the habit of repeating itself; using the same script, just with different names, figures, and places. Some 10,000 years ago, the Altiplano and the Titicaca lake basin, wedged between modern day Peru and Bolivia, became home to hunters and gatherers who subsisted on the herds of llamas and vicuñas as well as the bounty of birds and fish.

Putucos: What A Indigenous Technique Can Tell Us About Sustainability - Image 6 of 4Putucos: What A Indigenous Technique Can Tell Us About Sustainability - Image 10 of 4Putucos: What A Indigenous Technique Can Tell Us About Sustainability - Image 14 of 4Putucos: What A Indigenous Technique Can Tell Us About Sustainability - Image 16 of 4Putucos: What A Indigenous Technique Can Tell Us About Sustainability - More Images+ 12

Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky

Across the world, urban clusters have —to a greater or lesser extent— social and economic differences. Reflected in space, these imbalances of income and access to education, health, sanitation, and infrastructure generate ruptures more or less visible —although drastically felt.

Although a daily reality for some, socio-spatial inequalities can often go unnoticed. Photographer Johnny Miller states, "Discrepancies in how people live are sometimes hard to see from the ground... Oftentimes, communities of extreme wealth and privilege will exist just meters from squalid conditions and shack dwellings." Miller's photo series 'Unequal Scenes' seeks "to portray the most 'Unequal Scenes' in [the world] as objectively as possible."

Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky - Image 2 of 4Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky - Image 3 of 4Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky - Image 4 of 4Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky - Image 5 of 4Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky - More Images+ 11

Free Online Course on Urban Challenges in the Global South Offers one Scholarship for a Summer School in TU Delft, the Netherlands

"Rethink the City; New Approaches to Global and Local Urban Challenges" is a free online course given by Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. After two successful versions with more than 17.000 participants, a new version will start on February 19, 2020. The course received the Excellence in Teaching Award 2017 bestowed by AESOP (Association of European Schools of Planning).

In the Rethink the City MOOC you will learn about today's urban challenges focusing on the Global South. We will debate on three different topics, going beyond traditional urban strategies and policies: spatial justice, housing provision and management, and

36 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know

36 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know - Image 5 of 4
© Zhou Ruogu/Savoye Photographe

Countries that are part of the so-called “global south” have undergone many transformations in their cities and urban contexts in recent years due to the economic and social challenges they face. Urban growth, sustainable development, quality of life and health in emerging cities, and the development of their own cultural identity have been some of the issues that local architecture had to incorporate.

Young architects have understood the importance of making an architecture that is deeply rooted in their own territory while giving this architecture a clear local identity. By generating new typologies and using their own resources and materials, they have presented innovative, site-specific, and, above all, solutions with a new fresh focus towards what represents them as creators of this architecture.

36 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know - Image 1 of 436 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know - Image 2 of 436 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know - Image 3 of 436 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know - Image 4 of 436 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know - More Images+ 33

Sharjah Architecture Triennial Announces Global South-based Participants and Projects for Its Inaugural Edition

Curated by Adrian Lahoud, The Sharjah Architecture Triennial opens this November, self-proclaiming as "the first international platform on architecture and urbanism of the Global South."

Lahoud, who is also Dean of the School of Architecture at the Royal College of Art, has defined the theme for the inaugural edition —Rights of Future Generations— as an instance to "question how inheritance, legacy, and the state of the environment are passed from one generation to the next, how present decisions have long-term intergenerational consequences, and how other expressions of co-existence, including indigenous ones, might challenge dominant western perspectives."

From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles

Back in 2008, ArchDaily embarked on a challenging mission: to provide inspiration, knowledge, and tools to the architects tasked with designing cities. In an effort to further align our strategy with these challenges, we recently introduced monthly themes in order to dig deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse. From architects who don't design to reframing climate change as a global issue, we are celebrating our 11th birthday by asking 11 editors and curators to choose ArchDaily's most inspiring articles.

Free Online Course on Urban Challenges in the Global South Offers Two Scholarships for a Summer School in the Netherlands

The Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) Rethink the City. New Approaches to Global and Local Urban Challenges, is a free online course taught by the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment of Delft University of Technology. The course starts on May, 2nd, 2018. The first version of the course received the Excellence in Teaching Award 2017 bestowed by AESOP (Association of European Schools of Planning).

What It’s Like to Be an Architect Who Doesn’t Design Buildings

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now.