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Climate Change: The Latest Architecture and News

GLV Gossamer Merge Resilience and Urbanism in Xi'an, China

07:30 - 16 July, 2019
GLV Gossamer Merge Resilience and Urbanism in Xi'an, China, © GVL Gossamer
© GVL Gossamer

GLV Gossamer has released images of their design for a 19 kilometer stretch of waterfront along the Jing River in Xi’an, China. The proposal, a finalist in an international design competition, celebrates the site’s history at the origin of the Silk Road through strategies that tap into ancient and enduring histories of traditional architecture, merchant trade, and agricultural innovation. These enduring histories are woven with contemporary influences such as responses to major climatic and environmental challenges.

© GVL Gossamer © GVL Gossamer © GVL Gossamer © GVL Gossamer + 14

Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example

07:00 - 5 July, 2019
Why Should We Invest in Mitigation Instead of Reconstruction? Chile's Resiliency is a Good Example, © Carolina Barría Kemp, under license <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt
© Carolina Barría Kemp, under license CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageThe eruption of the Calbuco volcano (2015) seen from Puerto Montt

Chile is a country used to natural disasters as much as to the reconstruction process. However, the frequency of these cycles has increased over the years. According to the Ministry of Interior (Homeland), 43% of all natural disasters recorded in Chile since 1960 happened between 2014 and 2017. In fact, the government is already involved in several reconstruction processes across the country.

Designed by Teodoro Fernández Arquitectos, Kaukari Urban Park turned the channel of the Copiapó River into an accessible urban green space, capable of controling potential floods, just as it happened in 2015. Image © Rodrigo Opazo Designed by Sebastian Irarrázaval, the Constitución Public Library was part of a public-private initiative taken to rebuild the city of Constitución after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Felipe Díaz Contardo Designed by PLAN Arquitectos, Constitución's Consistorial Town Hall was part of the reconstruction of the city after 2010 Chile earthquake. Image © Pablo Blanco Villa Verde Housing / ELEMENTAL. Image © Suyin Chia + 7

The Age of Travel is Over

05:30 - 27 June, 2019
The Age of Travel is Over, Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974 / Paul Andreu © Paul Maurer
Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974 / Paul Andreu © Paul Maurer

Modernism always wanted to have it both ways: on the one hand, modernist architecture was supposed to be, in theory, the same in all places; that's one reason why modernism in architecture was also called the International Style. If all modernist buildings look the same, when you see one you have seen them all: no need for further travel. Yet throughout the 20th century modernist culture and technology enthusiastically endorsed and favored travel. In the 60s we traveled to the Moon, and civil aviation made the world smaller. In modernist culture, travel was good. It made all travelers better, happier humans. It was good to learn foreign languages and to go see distant places. High modernist travel was not only good; it was also cool. The jet setters of the 60s were the coolest citizens of the world. Even later in the 20th century the general expectation was that borderless, seamless travel would keep getting easier and more frequent. Most Europeans of my generation grew up learning two or more foreign languages, and it was not unusual until recently to be born in one country, to study in another, and find one's first job in a third one. That was seen as an opportunity, not as a deprivation.

6 Steps for Designing Healthy Cities

06:05 - 12 June, 2019
6 Steps for Designing Healthy Cities,  “Atelier Stad Breda”, 2015. In the image a series of design strategies touching upon energy, ecology and economy come together.
“Atelier Stad Breda”, 2015. In the image a series of design strategies touching upon energy, ecology and economy come together.

By some estimates, cities consume over two-thirds of the world’s energy, and account for more than 70% of global CO2 emissions: a figure sure to increase as the global migration from rural to urban areas continues. In the pursuit of exploring new models for how healthy cities could more effectively sustain these demands, Dutch design and research studio FABRICations has investigated how cities of the Netherlands can reduce carbon emissions through new design-led approaches.

Opinion: Manit Rastogi of Morphogenesis on Environment Sensitive Urbanism

06:30 - 5 June, 2019
Pearl Academy. Image by Morphogenesis © Edmund Sumner
Pearl Academy. Image by Morphogenesis © Edmund Sumner

Campus for Infosys. Image © Morphogenesis Pearl Academy. Image by Morphogenesis © Edmund Sumner Pearl Academy. Image © Andre Fanthome, by Morphogenesis Pearl Academy. Image © Andre Fanthome, by Morphogenesis + 14

A recent report by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) report reveals that the health of our ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health, and quality of life worldwide. At this point, scientists believe that ecosystems untouched by human interventions no longer exist. Human civilization and technology have permanently altered our planet and some of the most tangible impacts include imploding population numbers, deforestation, pollution (air, water, soil, and industrial), ocean acidification, climate change, and invasive alien species.

New York City's Mayor is Planning to Ban New Glass Skyscrapers

11:00 - 23 April, 2019
New York City's Mayor is Planning to Ban New Glass Skyscrapers, © Bizzi & Partners
© Bizzi & Partners

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans to introduce a bill banning the construction of glass skyscrapers, forming part of efforts to reduce citywide greenhouse emissions by 30 percent. Unveiling the plans, he described all-glass façade skyscrapers as “incredibly inefficient” because of heat loss, according to NBC New York.

Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation will use Taliesin West to Educate about Living with Nature

11:00 - 22 April, 2019
Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation will use Taliesin West to Educate about Living with Nature , © Andrew Pielage
© Andrew Pielage

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation has used Earth Day, April 22nd, 2019, to launch a new initiative focused on educating the public about how sustainable practices are used in the conservation of National Historic Landmark sites, including the renowned architect’s Taliesin (Wisconsin) and Taliesin West (Arizona) residences. Taking place throughout the year, the Foundation’s efforts will aim to show how these practices can serve as examples for other facets of society.

How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change

09:00 - 22 April, 2019
How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change, © SCAPE/City of Boston
© SCAPE/City of Boston

As the world recognizes Earth Day 2019, the public discourse is increasingly dominated by citizen action across the world manifesting a widespread fear and frustration at a perceived lack of action by governments and officials to confront the issue forthrightly. From the Extinction Rebellion protests that have gripped London, to school student strikes across 125 countries, global cities are increasingly finding themselves on the front line of a battle to limit the effects of global warming.

New York City to Combat Rising Sea Levels by Extending the Manhattan Coastline

09:00 - 22 March, 2019
New York City to Combat Rising Sea Levels by Extending the Manhattan Coastline, via NYCEDC
via NYCEDC

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans for a $10 billion coastal resilience project, designed to protect Lower Manhattan from flooding. In an editorial piece in New York Magazine, Mayor de Blasio outlined the ambitious plans to alter the waterfront of the Financial District, constructing a major infrastructural element up to 500 feet into the East River.

Part of the Lower Manhattan Climate Resilience Study, and designed in collaboration with climate scientists and local offices, the Mayor describes the scheme as “one of the most complex environmental and engineering challenges [New York] has ever undertaken and will, literally, alter the shape of the island of Manhattan.” The multi-billion dollar project is designed to protect Manhattan through the year 2100.

From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles

05:30 - 14 March, 2019
From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles, Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban
Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban

Back in 2008, ArchDaily embarked on a challenging mission: to provide inspiration, knowledge, and tools to the architects tasked with designing cities. In an effort to further align our strategy with these challenges, we recently introduced monthly themes in order to dig deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse. From architects who don't design to reframing climate change as a global issue, we are celebrating our 11th birthday by asking 11 editors and curators to choose ArchDaily's most inspiring articles.

Request for Qualifications: Climate-Adaptive Design for Jose Marti Park in Little Havana, Fl

09:00 - 8 February, 2019
Request for Qualifications: Climate-Adaptive Design for Jose Marti Park in Little Havana, Fl

About the Jose Marti Park Redesign RFQ:
Through this RFQ, Van Alen and the City of Miami seek to commission a multi-disciplinary design team for the project that offers the full range of professional urban design, landscape architecture, and engineering services and includes at least one Florida-licensed firm. The design team will work with Van Alen Institute and the City to ensure that this treasured public space serves the present and future needs of the Little Havana community. Innovative and thoughtful design should allow the park to minimize flood impacts to the neighborhood, adapt to sea level rise over time, and enhance waterfront access for residents. Ideally this project results in a solution that can be replicated in other places experiencing similar conditions.

The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019

08:30 - 4 February, 2019
The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019, © Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction
© Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction

It is, once again, the time of year where we look towards the future to define the goals and approaches that we will take for our careers throughout the upcoming year. To help the millions of architects who visit ArchDaily every day from all over the world, we compiled a list of the most popular ideas of 2018, which will continue to be developed and consolidated throughout 2019.

Over 130 million users discovered new references, materials, and tools in 2018 alone, infusing their practice of architecture with the means to improve the quality of life for our cities and built spaces. As users demonstrated certain affinities and/or demonstrated greater interest in particular topics, these emerged as trends. 

Reframing Climate Change as a Local Problem of Global Proportion: 4 Ways Architects can Deliver Change

07:00 - 28 January, 2019
Bankside 123 in London creates new routes, public spaces and retail, with three simple rectilinear buildings set within a permeable public realm designed to reconnect the site with its surroundings. Image Courtesy of Allies & Morrison
Bankside 123 in London creates new routes, public spaces and retail, with three simple rectilinear buildings set within a permeable public realm designed to reconnect the site with its surroundings. Image Courtesy of Allies & Morrison

The latest UN special report on climate change, released in October 2018, was bleak - perhaps unsurprisingly after a year of recording breaking temperatures, wildfires, floods, and storms. The report, released by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), reiterated the magnitude of climate change’s global impact, but shed new light on the problem’s depth and urgency. Climate change is a catastrophe for the world as we know it and will transform it into something that we don’t. And we have just 12 years to prevent it.

How Urban Planning Can Help Us Cope With Climate Change

07:00 - 17 January, 2019
How Urban Planning Can Help Us Cope With Climate Change, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. Image via Shutterstock
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. Image via Shutterstock

Cities are hotter than surrounding areas because of a climate phenomena that is known as the urban heat island (UHI). While scientists have studied this effect for decades, new information has recently come to light that points to the way we arrange our cities as a key contributor to raised temperatures. The results could help city planners build our future cities better.

The Environmental Cost of Cement, and What to Do About It

11:30 - 9 January, 2019
The Environmental Cost of Cement, and What to Do About It, Sesc Pompeia / Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Fernando Pires
Sesc Pompeia / Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Fernando Pires

For thousands of years, concrete has been a foundation of the built environment: the most widely used man-made material on the planet. However, as architects, and the public alike, sharpen their focus on the causes and effects of climate change, the environmental damage caused by cement has become a subject of unease.

As exhibited in a recent in-depth article by Lucy Rodgers for BBC News, cement is the source of about 8% of global CO2 emissions. The piece was written off the back of the UN’s COP24 climate change conference in Poland and found that in order to meet the requirements of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, annual cement emissions must fall by 16% by 2030.

The AIA Toolkit for Architects in the Era of Climate Change

07:45 - 23 December, 2018
The AIA Toolkit for Architects in the Era of Climate Change, Mundo Verde at Cook Campus / Studio Twenty Seven Architecture
Mundo Verde at Cook Campus / Studio Twenty Seven Architecture

A misconception often surfaces in design circles that architectural beauty and evidence-based environmental performance are mutually exclusive. To address this, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment (COTE) is releasing a new tool that can assist architecture firms in designing high-performance energy-efficient buildings.

Despite the federal stance on paramount environmental issues, the AIA upholds and advocates for the responsibility of architects to mitigate against the effects of climate change. Aware that the construction industry consumes nearly 40% of the energy supply nationwide, the AIA COTE® Top Ten Toolkit presents a series of strategies to promote sustainability without compromising the design.

Albion District Library / Perkins + Will Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture / LMS Architects Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery / DLR Group Family House / LMS Architects + 6