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Frank Lloyd Wright: The Latest Architecture and News

Frank Lloyd Wright's Civic Center Captured on Film by Skyler Dahan

Skyler Dahan, an LA-based photographer, has captured Frank Lloyd Wright's Civic Center, in Marin County. Shot on Kodak Portra film with a Contax 645 medium format camera, the series of images highlight Frank Lloyd Wright's latest commission. Serving as a justice hall, the project was actually completed by Wright's protégé Aaron Green after the architect’s death.

Courtesy of Skyler DahanCourtesy of Skyler DahanCourtesy of Skyler DahanCourtesy of Skyler Dahan+ 7

One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unpublished Projects Revealed to the Public: the Arizona State Capitol

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation has uncovered the Arizona State Capitol project, a never seen before unbuilt proposal by Wright. An “oasis of democracy in the Sonoran Desert”, the intervention revealed in the latest issue of The Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, has been digitally remodeled, with photorealistic visualizations by David Romero.

© David Romero© David Romero© David Romero© David Romero+ 8

WEEK Animates Famous Buildings in Series of Playful Gifs

Created between 2016 and 2020, WEEK and Axel de Stampa have put together a series of architecture gifs, Architecture Animée or Animated Architecture, revealing a playful and fictional side of famous buildings such as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Fondation Louis Vuitton by Gehry Partners, and 1111 Lincoln Road by Herzog & de Meuron.

Victoria Tower by Wingårdh Arkitektkontor – GIF Axel de Stampa – Photo Åke Eson Lindman. Image Courtesy of Axel de Stampa, WEEKThe Grove at Grand Bay by BIG – GIF Axel de Stampa – Photo Robin Hill. Image Courtesy of Axel de Stampa, WEEKFondation Louis Vuitton by Gehry Partners – GIF Axel de Stampa – Photo Iwan Baan. Image Courtesy of Axel de Stampa, WEEK1111 Lincoln Road by Herzog & de Meuron – GIF Axel de Stampa – Photo Hufton Crow. Image Courtesy of Axel de Stampa, WEEK+ 9

Take a Virtual Tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Most Iconic Architecture

As cultural venues and museums remain closed, one initiative launched in early April brings Frank Lloyd Wright’s most prominent projects to the public via virtual tours. Shared under the hashtag #WrightVirtualVisits, the series now features twenty-four sites, and more are expected to join as the project unfolds. With new videos published every Thursday until July 15, the project compiles an insightful glimpse into Wright’s extensive body of work.

Modernist San Francisco Map: Guide to Modernist Architecture in Bay Area

Guide map to Modernist architecture across San Francisco and the Bay Area. This two-sided folded map with original photography by Jason Woods is edited by Mitchell Schwarzer, Professor at California College of the Arts, and author of numerous books about architecture. The guide features over fifty influential examples of Modernist and Brutalist architecture from Berkeley and Oakland to Palo Alto and San Mateo. Details for individual buildings are supported by an introduction to Modernism in the Bay Area by Schwarzer. Architects featured include Vernon de Mars, Beverley Thorne, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, Pier Luigi Nervi,

New Petition Aims to Save The School of Architecture at Taliesin

Last month, The School of Architecture at Taliesin announced the closing of the school after 88 years. The school and the Frank Lloyd Wright foundation issued statements on the closure, as well as the students. Now, a new petition started by Simon DeAguero aims to save the school from closing. The news of closure followed the conclusion of a multi-year struggle back in 2017, when the school was approved to maintain its accreditation as an institute of higher learning.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro to Renovate Frank Lloyd Wright's Kalita Humphreys Theater

Diller Scofidio + Renfro have been selected to renovate Frank Lloyd Wright's Kalita Humphreys Theater in Dallas. Home to the Dallas Theater Center since its opening in 1959, the renovation project will include a master plan for the nine-acre Kalita Humphreys site, which will include new theater spaces and a connection to the Katy Trail.

City of the Future Elaborates on Responsive Architecture

City of the Future is a bi-weekly podcast from Sidewalk Labs that explores ideas and innovations that will transform cities.

In the final episode of season 2, hosts Eric Jaffe and Vanessa Quirk discuss the past, present, and future of responsive architecture with Sidewalk Labs’ director of public realm Jesse Shapins, engineer and microclimate expert Goncalo Pedro, Bubbletecture author Sharon Francis, and renowned architect Liz Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

Paul Hendrickson on the Dreams and Furies of Frank Lloyd Wright

Fallingwater House © Flickr user Pablo Sanchez Martin (CC BY 2.0)
Fallingwater House © Flickr user Pablo Sanchez Martin (CC BY 2.0)

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Frank Lloyd Wright might be the most chronicled architect of the past 150 years. Scores of books, both mainstream and academic, have been written about him. “Wright scholars” are common in the academy. Dissertations are still being penned about the great man, six decades after his death. Philip Johnson called Wright “my favorite 19th-century architect.” (It was not meant as a compliment.) And yet every half-decade or so, Johnson’s mothership, MoMA, mounts yet another Wright exhibition, and thousands flock to see the now-familiar models, drawings, and photographs. Wright has even received the Ken Burns treatment, a full-length PBS documentary, surely a sign of his Mount Rushmore–like cultural status. Into this very crowded room now steps author Paul Hendrickson, whose new book, Plagued by Fire: The Dreams and Furies of Frank Lloyd Wright (Knopf), attempts to shed new light on the architect.

23 Buildings You Shouldn’t Miss in Chicago

On August 12, 1833, the Town of Chicago had roughly 200 inhabitants. Four years later, in 1837, it was upgraded to The City of Chicago – an interesting fact given that there are still 19 incorporated towns in Illinois. The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 killed 300 people, destroyed about 3.3 square miles (9 km2), and left more than 100,000 residents homeless. However, by that time Chicago had become the world’s fastest-growing city and its population had risen over 300,000 inhabitants. The fire meant these ambitious citizens had to start again.

© BallPark via Wikimedia Commons© Virginia Duran© Daniel Schwen via Wikimedia Commons© Will Taubert via Wikimedia Commons+ 25

With admirable strength, the city was reborn from the ashes and some of Chicago’s best architecture was constructed immediately after. Structures like the Rookery Building (1888, Frank Lloyd Wright), the Auditorium Building (1889, Louis Sullivan) and the Monadnock Building (1893, Burnham & Root, Holabird & Roche) are a few examples of the high standards the city was aiming for.

Since then, Chicago has only continued adding value to its urban grid and new buildings have been progressively enhancing the city’s beautiful skyline. This year Chicago celebrates the 2019-2020 Biennial and the city has plenty to offer. But, where to start?

If you love architecture, here is a list of buildings – old and new – that will help you understand, internalize and love Chicago’s built environment.

Shall we begin?

What Would 6 Cities of the United States be like if Frank Lloyd Wright or Robert Moses had Designed Them?

New York Pedrestian View. Image © NetCreditChicago Aereal View. Image © NetCreditLos Ángeles Aereal View. Image © NetCreditHouston Aereal View. Image © NetCredit+ 18

The United States of America has provided enormous opportunities to develop some of the most iconic buildings in the history of architecture, leaving the mark of important architects in urban, suburban, and rural areas around the country. However, ambitious ideas often come with a high price that cannot always be paid,  causing some of the most exciting building, bridge, and tower designs to never evolve past archived plans.

8 Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings Given UNESCO World Heritage Status

Eight buildings by acclaimed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright have been inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Titled “The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright,” the list of eight major works is a revision of a previous application lodged in February 2015. Submitted by the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy, the list spans Wright’s 70-year career with schemes such as Unity Temple, Taliesin West, Fallingwater, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

S.C. Johnson and Son Administration Building. Image © Jeff DeanUnity Temple. Image © Sean MarshallSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/57537089@N00/198494302/'>Flickr user gomattolson</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a>+ 25

Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation will use Taliesin West to Educate about Living with Nature

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation has used Earth Day, April 22nd, 2019, to launch a new initiative focused on educating the public about how sustainable practices are used in the conservation of National Historic Landmark sites, including the renowned architect’s Taliesin (Wisconsin) and Taliesin West (Arizona) residences. Taking place throughout the year, the Foundation’s efforts will aim to show how these practices can serve as examples for other facets of society.

Federico Babina's "Archivoids" Depicts the Invisible Masses left by Famous Architects

Italian artist Federico Babina has published the latest in his impressive portfolio of architectural illustrations. “Archivoid” seeks to “sculpt invisible masses of space” through the reading of negatives – using the architectural language of famous designers past and present, from Frank Lloyd Wright to Bjarke Ingels.

Babina’s images create an inverse point of view, a reversal of perception for an alternative reading of space, and reality itself. Making negative space his protagonist, Babina traces the “Architectural footprints” of famous architects, coupling mysterious geometries with a vibrant color scheme.

© Federico Babina© Federico Babina© Federico Babina© Federico Babina+ 9