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Virtual Reality: The Latest Architecture and News

How To Create a 360 R​ender (And How to Improve your Presentation with Virtual Reality)

04:00 - 30 January, 2019
How To Create a 360 R​ender (And How to Improve your Presentation with Virtual Reality), Screenshot, edited, video <a href='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpdmGJF_CrQ&feature=youtu.be'>Tutorial: Create 360 panoramic renders using Vray for Sketchup for VR presentations.</a>. Image
Screenshot, edited, video Tutorial: Create 360 panoramic renders using Vray for Sketchup for VR presentations.. Image

If you're looking to upgrade your standard architecture presentation, SENTIO VR's tutorials can be very useful. They allow you to accurately use Revit, SketchUp, V-ray, 3Ds Max, Lumion and Cinema4D to create 360 renders and perform virtual reality experiences, with both technical and visual advice.

Below, we've compiled a list of useful videos. 

Rios Clementi Hale Studios x Cal Poly Tech: VR in Architecture

03:30 - 28 January, 2019
Rios Clementi Hale Studios x Cal Poly Tech: VR in Architecture , Rios Clementi Hale Studios.
Rios Clementi Hale Studios.

Join Rios Clementi Hale Studios and Cal Poly Tech for an investigation of virtual reality in architecture on Sunday, December 9 at the Rios Clementi Hale Studios offices.

A jury will judge final presentations from architecture students taught by Frank Clementi and other RCHS team members. The virtual reality projects all aim to evaluate the essential conventions of architectural spaces and adapt them to the reduced conditions of simulated environments. Attendees are invited to experience the students' plans firsthand followed by a roundtable discussion investigating the evolution of architecture and how it behaves.

This event is open to the public.

This is How a Complex Brick Wall is Built Using Augmented Reality

05:00 - 25 January, 2019
This is How a Complex Brick Wall is Built Using Augmented Reality, Cortesía de Fologram
Cortesía de Fologram

Fusing augmented reality with the physical space, Fologram seeks to facilitate the construction of complex designs (for example, parametric designs that require a series of measurements, verification, and specific care) through digital instructions that are virtually superimposed into the workspace, directing a step-by-step guide for bricklayers during the construction process.

'Research institutions and large companies are working with industrial robots to automate these challenging construction tasks. However, robots aren’t well-suited for unpredictable construction environments, and even the most sophisticated computer vision algorithms cannot match the intuition and skill of a trained bricklayer,' stated their creators.

Cortesía de Fologram Cortesía de Fologram Cortesía de Fologram Cortesía de Fologram + 9

Exploring Your Project in Virtual Reality: 7 Tips from the Experts Who Make It

05:00 - 14 January, 2019
Exploring Your Project in Virtual Reality: 7 Tips from the Experts Who Make It, Courtesy of Enscape
Courtesy of Enscape

Virtual reality offers benefits that, just years ago, were hardly even imaginable. Projects can be walked through before being built; the interiors fully visualized before all the details are decided. It allows architects and clients the ability to work as true collaborators in the design of a project.

Zaha Hadid’s “Project Correl” Exhibition Allows Visitors to Build a Virtual Structure Over Time

09:00 - 12 December, 2018
Zaha Hadid’s “Project Correl” Exhibition Allows Visitors to Build a Virtual Structure Over Time, © Zaha Hadid Architects
© Zaha Hadid Architects

The Zaha Hadid Virtual Reality Group has published details of Project Correl, a collaborative experiment to test the potential of virtual reality as a tool for design. The experiment is currently on display in the University Contemporary Art Museum (MUAC) in Mexico City, where it forms part of Zaha Hadid Architects’ “Design As Second Nature” exhibition.

In the exhibition, visitors have the chance to engage with Project Correl in real time, transported to a virtual environment to collaborate with each other on an ever-evolving structure. The design will be periodically captured and exhibited in the gallery as scaled 3D printed models to further demonstrate the design process encouraged by Correl.

© Zaha Hadid Architects © Zaha Hadid Architects © Zaha Hadid Architects © Zaha Hadid Architects + 8

Making Real-Time Rendering Less Daunting: Unreal Engine Online Learning

Sponsored Article
Making Real-Time Rendering Less Daunting: Unreal Engine Online Learning

When you see new software that can speed up your workflow, it’s fun to imagine what you can do with it. But in reality, many of us don’t want to be among the first to try it out, especially if documentation is lacking. No one wants to spend countless hours fighting with mysterious features only to go back to the old workflow because you just need to get things done.

Maybe you’ve been thinking about trying out photoreal real-time rendering for your workflow, but you’re concerned that that on-ramp is too steep. Real-time rendering requires you to import your CAD scene into a game engine, and anytime you import to a new piece of software, there are going to be issues to solve. If you have to figure it out on your own, it’s going to be a long, hard road.

Learning New Design Viz Methods—Is It Worth It?

Sponsored Article
Learning New Design Viz Methods—Is It Worth It?, Tower Studio by Pawel Mielnik, rendered in real time with Unreal Engine
Tower Studio by Pawel Mielnik, rendered in real time with Unreal Engine

Design visualization just keeps reaching new heights. While renderings remain a common part of design presentation, advances in technology have made new types of media not only possible but within the reach of even small teams and firms. These newer types of media require a change in workflow. Is it worth it?

Step Inside Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion with This 360° Virtual Tour

12:00 - 25 June, 2018
Step Inside Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion with This 360° Virtual Tour, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

For readers around the world who monitored with enthusiasm the opening of Frida Escobedo’s Serpentine Pavilion, but were unable to reach London to experience it in real life, Photographer Nikhilesh Haval of nikreations is here to help.

Similar to previous productions of BIG’s 2016 Pavilion, and SelgasCano’s 2015 Pavilion, Haval 360-degree virtual tour explores Escobedo’s pavilion to capture aesthetic delights such as the Mexican celosias façade, shallow water pool, and curving, mirrored roof element. When inside the courtyard, don’t forget to look up!

Ditch the Wait with Real-Time Rendering

01:30 - 18 June, 2018
Ditch the Wait with Real-Time Rendering, Courtesy of TCIMAGE Design Studio
Courtesy of TCIMAGE Design Studio

A recent independent survey of more than 2000 architectural visualization professionals revealed an intriguing trend. More than 20% of these designers and architects are using real-time rendering as part of their presentation workflows right now, with another 40% trying it out for adoption.

The World's First Pavilion-Scale Structure Built Using Augmented Reality

08:00 - 8 June, 2018

Fologram has recently built the world’s first pavilion-scale steel structure using the HoloLens, displaying the possibilities of integrating standard CAD workflow with augmented reality. By displaying the generative design model through holographic instructions rather than traditional 2D drawings, it explores the potential of revolutionizing the bridge between design and construction.

Courtesy of Fologram Courtesy of Fologram Courtesy of Fologram Courtesy of Fologram + 11

This Simple VR Tool Instantly Communicates Your Design Intent in 1:1 Scale

01:00 - 15 May, 2018
This Simple VR Tool Instantly Communicates Your Design Intent in 1:1 Scale

Communicating design intent and conveying space to non-technical clients has always been a challenge for architects. Fortunately, advancements such as virtual reality (VR) are starting to pave the way for new tools to address this challenge. The most immersive and effective solutions are ones that empower you to fully navigate 3D models, like Prospect by IrisVR. Created by architects, Prospect enables designers to easily jump into a 1:1, true to scale VR version of their 3D model.

Virtual Reality Opens Up New Possibilities for Historic Preservation

08:00 - 27 April, 2018
Virtual Reality Opens Up New Possibilities for Historic Preservation, via Google
via Google

In partnership with a 3D laser-scanning nonprofit called CyArk, Google Arts & Culture began the Open Heritage Project, a new chapter for historic preservation in the form of virtual reality. By using advanced 3D laser scanning technology, high-res drone photography, and DSLR cameras, CyArk can virtually recreate historic architecture to be more easily explored and restored.

3 Ways Multi-User VR Will Enhance the Design Work of the Future

09:30 - 7 February, 2018
3 Ways Multi-User VR Will Enhance the Design Work of the Future, © <a href='https://unsplash.com/photos/mlZzMow-CQw'>Unsplash user Neonbrand</a>
© Unsplash user Neonbrand

2018 should prove to be a pivotal moment in how the design community uses virtual reality to deliver work. With leading firms exploring the introduction of mult capabilities, the technology will experience a breakthrough shift from purely enabling new modes of consumption to one that empowers design.

Today, VR essentially allows designers, clients, and stakeholders to consume models in dynamic new virtual environments. One by one, individuals can put on VR goggles and experience spaces that only exist digitally as others watch, listen to their reactions, and wait their turn. This implementation of VR technology has already strengthened design outcomes by enhancing strong communication throughout the design process, translating to less risk and stronger confidence in the eventual built product for clients.

A Virtual Look Inside Case Study House #10 by Kemper Nomland & Kemper Nomland Jr

09:30 - 6 February, 2018

The tenth Case Study House wasn’t actually intended for the Arts & Architecture programme. It was added on its completion in 1947, to fill out the roster, as many houses remained unbuilt. Clearly, the Nomland design earned its place on the list, having many features in common with other Case Study homes and, most importantly, meeting the stated aims of economy, simplicity, new materials and techniques, and indoor/outdoor integration. The different departure point, however, can be seen in the layout. Whereas Case Study homes were designed primarily for families, this plan is for “a family of adults”—which is to say, a childless couple.

5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond

09:30 - 4 January, 2018
5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond, Composite based on images by Pixabay users <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/building-reflection-window-glass-922529/'>LenaSevcikova</a> and <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/man-virtual-reality-samsung-gear-vr-1416140/'>HammerandTusk</a>
Composite based on images by Pixabay users LenaSevcikova and HammerandTusk

Even with tech like virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D printing, computational design and robotics already reshaping architecture practice, the design community is just scratching the surface of the potential of new technologies. Designers who recognize this and invest in building skills and expertise to maximize the use of these tools in the future will inherently become better architects, and position themselves for entirely new career paths as our profession evolves. It is a uniquely exciting moment for architecture to advance through innovative use of technology. Even just a decade ago, designers with interests in both architecture and technology were essentially required to pursue one or the other. Now, with architecture beginning to harness the power of cutting-edge technologies, these fields are no longer mutually exclusive. Rather than choose a preferred path, today’s architects are encouraged to embrace technology to become sought-out talent.

With much written about how technology is changing the way architects work and the products we can deliver to clients during a project’s lifecycle, there has been less focus on how technology is changing career opportunities in the profession. Architecture companies are now hiring roles that didn’t exist even three years ago. Here’s a look at five emerging career paths design technology will make possible in 2018 and the immediate future.

The New York Times Takes Us to the New 7 Wonders of the World with 360 Videos

09:31 - 9 December, 2017
via The New York Times
via The New York Times

As part of their "Daily 360," The New York Times has released a series of immersive videos exploring the New Seven Wonders of the World, offering viewers the experience of visiting the architectural marvels themselves without having to fly 5000 miles. Back in 2007, the seven monuments were announced after a seven-year poll that included votes by 100 million people who recognized the structural and innovative significance of these masterpieces across the planet.

The Daily 360 is a collection of videos by The New York Times; rather than a 2d moving image, they give a real understanding of space, transporting you to the place. Over the last year, their videos have included the Guggenheim, Art Deco masterpieces and memorial architecture from different cultures. Experience the New Seven Wonders of the World for yourself below:

From Smartphones to Smart Cities: What Happens When We Try to Solve Every Problem With Technology?

09:30 - 30 November, 2017
From Smartphones to Smart Cities: What Happens When We Try to Solve Every Problem With Technology?, Songdo in South Korea is perhaps the most complete realization yet of the smart city concept. Image Courtesy of Cisco
Songdo in South Korea is perhaps the most complete realization yet of the smart city concept. Image Courtesy of Cisco

In order to be successful in any field, professionals must stay ahead of the curve—though in architecture nowadays, technology progresses so quickly that it’s difficult to be on the front lines. Virtual Reality can transport architects and their clients into unbuilt designs and foreign lands. Smart Cities implement a network of information and communication technologies to conserve resources and simplify everyday life. Responsive Design will give buildings the ability to be an extension of the human body by sensing occupants' needs and responding to them.

With the technology boom, if architects want to stay in the game they will inevitably have to work alongside not only techies but scientists too. Neuroscientist Colin Ellard works “at the intersection of psychology and architectural and urban design.” In his book, Places of the Heart: The Psychogeography of Everyday Life, Ellard examines how our technology-based world impacts our emotions and behavior to try to figure out what kind of world we should strive to create.

Architecture Is Moving Into a Realm Where History Plays as Much a Part as Medium

05:30 - 13 November, 2017
Architecture Is Moving Into a Realm Where History Plays as Much a Part as Medium, Detail: Träbågen (unrealized). Image © Space Popular
Detail: Träbågen (unrealized). Image © Space Popular

In this essay British architect and academic Dr. Timothy Brittain-Catlin presents the work of Space Popular, an emerging practice exploring the meaning of and methods behind deploying virtual reality techniques in the architectural design process.

Architectural practice, especially in the UK, is moving fast into a realm where history plays as much a part as medium. But the ways in which architects work have been transformed entirely from those of the past, generating a fundamental conflict: how in practice does design through virtual reality use history? In the earliest days of fly-throughs we all realised that we could show our work to clients in a way that even the least plan-literate could understand. We could develop details three-dimensionally and from different angles, even representing different times of day. But what next? How do we engage historical knowledge and experience of buildings?