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Virtual Reality: The Latest Architecture and News

What Is NFT Architecture and How Is It Different from Regular 3D Models?

Imagine yourself welcoming your colleagues to a business meeting at your home. The table is set next to the infinity pool, under the shadow of a huge curved metal structure reminiscent of Zaha Hadid's most audacious designs except for the complete absence of pillars. Hovering in the air, the roof completes an idyllic setting for this mansion on a rocky hillside. The house was recently acquired as an NFT and is digitally accessed via encrypted code. That's right, this is your virtual home. The physical one is a small 40m2 apartment in the center of one of the busiest and most polluted cities in the global south.

Layering of Realities: VR, AR, and MR as the Future of Environmental Rendering

Working remotely throughout the past year has accelerated the introduction of new approaches to real-time rendering, and with it, a new necessity was born: how can a person feel physically present inside a space, without actually being there? Ultimately, designers resorted to the virtual world, a vast realm of interactive built environments that can be accessed from the comfort of one's home. Even the tools utilized, such as headsets and goggles, have become more accessible to the vast majority of the public and are being sold at a lower price than they initially were. We have become accustomed to build, modify, and navigate between different environments, going back and forth between what is real and what isn't. Truth is, virtual has become the new normal.

© Matthew Daiter© Matthew Daiter© HighRock© Refik Anadol+ 11

Rendering as a Tool to Restore the Glory of Ancient Chinese Architecture

Heritage buildings are precious treasures passed down to us by our ancestors. They are also intangible cultural gifts for all mankind, a discovery of the past. Nevertheless, as time changes, ancient Chinese architecture, either destroyed by the forces of wars or nature, is gradually losing its original glory, making the protection and restoration of ancient buildings an urgent matter in this contemporary world.

Mars House, First Digital Home to be Sold on the NFT Marketplace

Mars House designed in May 2020 by Artist Krista Kim, has become the first sold digital NFT home in the world. The 3D digital file that can be experienced in virtual reality, was just acquired. Rendered using Unreal Engine, a software used to create video games, the house can be experienced in VR, but could also be experienced through augmented reality (AR) environment in apps. A structure comprised of light, Mars House generates a healing atmosphere, with a musical accompaniment by Jeff Schroeder of The Smashing Pumpkins.

The Evolution of Visual Representation in Architecture (and How It Will Continue to Change)

According to Howard Gardner, human intelligence can be classified into 8 different categories. One of these is spatial intelligence, which describes the ability to mentally create and imagine three-dimensional spaces. Architecture is one of many disciplines that benefits from this ability and in this article we will explore just how visual representation in architecture has evolved throughout history--from displaying the most brilliant of ideas to capturing the wildest of dreams.

How Will Digitalization and Remote Construction Change our Habits as Architects?

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Architects don’t make buildings. Architects make drawings of buildings. But of course, someone has to make the building. The construction industry is one of the largest economic sectors and we all interact with the built environment on a daily basis, but the actual work of getting a building from drawing to structure has barely evolved over the decades. While the rest of the world has moved into Industry 4.0, the construction sector has not kept pace. Architecture has begun to embrace some digitalization. After all, not many of us work with mylar on drafting tables anymore. So with the architecture industry’s everlasting link to the construction industry, will the latter pick up some new technological tricks by association? And when it does, how will that change the role of the architect?

Communicating Ideas by Previewing Reality

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The exchange of ideas and concepts is a major part of any large modern building project. Architects, investors, general contractors and sub-contractors all use different tools to form both mental and modeled images of what the end result will look like. When some parties rely on renders or fly-throughs and others use 2D drawings, it can lead to communication difficulties. Reynaers discovered that by bringing together collaborators from different disciplines in its Avalon, the fog of misunderstandings evaporates and difficult decisions can be made on the spot.

From Backdrop to Spotlight: The Significance of Architecture in Video Game Design

We’ve asked our ArchDaily readers about which video game has impressed them most in terms of architectural visualization, and why. Hundreds of various answers later, it became evident that there isn’t one element that makes a video game stand out, but the virtually-built environment is almost always a key factor in how the game is experienced.

In video games, architecture plays a much bigger role than just being a backdrop of a virtual city or an authentic render of an existing one, it is, in fact, a fundamental component of transcending gamers into a virtual world that feels just as authentic as the real world does, but with extra adrenaline.

(WARNING: the videos and images featured in this article may potentially trigger seizures for people with photosensitive epilepsy)

How AR and VR Will Enhance the Future of the Sports Arena Experience

Throughout history, people from all walks of life with little in common have found ways to unite in neighborhood parks and filled stadiums to put those differences aside for the sake of the sports they love. Sports, and sports fandom, is a source of global unity, and perhaps fewer events in the world can generate such a wide range of emotions quite like a live match.

Blizzard Entertainment's Philip Klevestav on Designing Built Environments in Video Games

Realistic images and walk-throughs have become an integral part of project presentations. Designers are using cutting-edge softwares and constructing precise 3D models to showcase their work as authentically as possible. As for the world of video games, it is not just about the quality of the graphics or how accurate these graphics are, but rather the immersive experience of visual designs and how the players are communicating with the virtually-built environment.

In an exclusive interview with ArchDaily, Philip Klevestav, principle artist at Blizzard Entertainment, the gaming development company known for Warcraft, Overwatch, and Diablo, shares his insights on video game designs and the influence of architecture on the designing process.

© Philip Klevestav© Philip Klevestav© Philip Klevestav© Philip Klevestav+ 11

Material of the Future: 4 Architects that Experiment with Cross Laminated Timber

This article was originally published on The Architect's Newspaper as "Architects apply the latest in fabrication, design, and visualization to age-old timber."

Every so often, the field of architecture is presented with what is hailed as the next “miracle building material.” Concrete enabled the expansion of the Roman Empire, steel densified cities to previously unthinkable heights, and plastic reconstituted the architectural interior and the building economy along with it.

But it would be reasonable to question why and how, in the 21st century, timber was accorded a miracle status on the tail-end of a timeline several millennia-long. Though its rough-hewn surface and the puzzle-like assembly it engenders might seem antithetical to the current global demand for exponential building development, it is timber’s durability, renewability, and capacity for sequestering carbon—rather than release it—that inspires the building industry to heavily invest in its future.

A worm’s eye view of NN_House 1 reveals the back and forth between 3D neural network design and the limits of timber construction. Courtesy of Casey RehmThe design of the Meteorite allowed for both a monolithic exterior and an intimate interior and room for secondary spaces for installation and storage. Courtesy of Kivi SotamaaGilles Retsin and Stephan Markus Albrecht’s design for Nuremberg Concert Hall expresses the lightness of timber using 30-foot overhead CLT modules visible from the exterior.. Image© Filippo BologneseThe Wander Wood Pavilion was fabricated and assembled over three days to demonstrate the wide range of forms and applications timber can have when applied to robotic fabrication methods. Courtesy of David Correa+ 5

Freestyle - Architectural Adventures in Mass Media

RIBA presents its first virtual reality (VR) exhibition, exploring moments across 500 years of aesthetics in architecture.

What makes a style? How is a style collectively agreed upon and shared? Drawing on RIBA’s world-class collections, Space Popular uses virtual reality to examine styles of the past and to consider the technology’s impact on contemporary spaces and buildings. Historic artefacts will be displayed alongside newly commissioned content, inviting you to enter a beguiling virtual universe to experience how popular cultures and technologies impact architecture and its style evolution.

Making connections across mass media and style, Freestyle takes the visitor on a journey through

Supercharging Workflows with Real-Time Visualization Tool Twinmotion

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Forward-thinking architectural firms, infrastructure consultancies, and interior design businesses are increasingly leaning on real-time architectural visualization to explore, evaluate, and present designs. By affording clients and project stakeholders the opportunity to experience future spaces in interactive and immersive environments, real-time technology provides a compelling immediacy that 2D drawings cannot. 

“We’re Building New Ways of Working”: Morphosis Explores XR and the Future of Design Technologies

Shifts in technology reflect how designers are creating experiences of architecture and cities. New advances engender novel ways of working, and in turn, shape our design process. As a practice defined by pushing boundaries, experimenting with workflows, and embracing new design technologies, Morphosis has a forty-year history of enthusiastically wondering at the future.

Atrium and liner at Kolon One & Only Tower in Seoul, Korea. Image Courtesy of Morphosis ArchitectsKolon One & Only Tower, featuring brise-soleil composed of varying FRC modules. Image Courtesy of Morphosis ArchitectsGFRC facade panel installation at the M-Bridge complex in Sejong City, Korea. Image Courtesy of Morphosis ArchitectsDigital mockup for Dessault Systemes x Morphosis installation at Milan Design Week 2019. Image Courtesy of Morphosis Architects+ 12

A New Application Offers a VR Experience of The Palace of Versailles

A new application takes visitors into the virtual world of the Palace of Versailles. A first in the cultural scene, the VR application offers a detailed tour of the Royal Grand Apartments, the Chapel and the Opera amongst others. With photogrammetry, a 3-dimensional universe is reconstructed from 2D images of the 24 emblematic rooms of the palace.

Debunking 3 Myths about 3D Visualization and VR in Architectural Projects

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There’s a lot of buzz going on in terms of technology-driven innovation in the AEC industry. Especially the increasing use of 3D renderings and virtual reality for architectural projects is hitting every architect’s newsfeed. Photorealistic images and virtual reality walk-throughs seem to be turning into the new industry standard. That being said, for many architectural firms it seems to be hard to keep up with quickly developing new tech and thereby find ways to differentiate themselves from the competition.

Kilograph Turns Unbuilt Michael Graves Design into VR Watercolor Experience

Design company Kilograph has announced the release of “Imagined Landscapes,” a new virtual reality experience exploring the unbuilt work of architect Michael Graves. Based on Graves’ personal paintings, “Imagined Landscapes” offers the first chance to add VR watercolors to an architectural project, turning a conceptual resort into an interactive experience for visitors.

Courtesy of KilographCourtesy of KilographCourtesy of KilographCourtesy of Kilograph+ 14

Aesthetics of Prosthetics

The Aesthetics of Prosthetics exhibition is within the framework of Pratt Institute School of Architecture’s 2019 Dean’s Lecture Series and will take place between September 19th and October 17th.