the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Models

Chisel & Mouse Recreates Miniature Architectural Icons Perfect for Your Coffee Table

08:00 - 7 April, 2018
Chisel & Mouse Recreates Miniature Architectural Icons Perfect for Your Coffee Table, via Chisel & Mouse
via Chisel & Mouse

Have you ever wanted a miniature model of the Flatiron BuildingBurnham and Root’s famous Monadnock building, or even a 3D map of Amsterdam? Would you want to have your home transformed into a dollhouse-sized replica? UK-based Chisel & Mouse is reconstructing these architectural icons and custom pieces, and bringing them right to your shelf or mantle.

Show Us Your Best Architectural Model Photos!

06:00 - 5 February, 2018
Show Us Your Best Architectural Model Photos!, A model of Peter Zumthor's Saint Benedict Chapel, built for Kenneth Frampton's "Studies in Tectonic Culture" class at Columbia GSAPP and <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/805658/these-intricate-architectural-models-will-change-how-you-see-their-famous-full-size-counterparts'>photographed by James Ewing for the exhibition "Stagecraft: Models and Photos"</a>. Image © James Ewing, Courtesy Columbia GSAPP
A model of Peter Zumthor's Saint Benedict Chapel, built for Kenneth Frampton's "Studies in Tectonic Culture" class at Columbia GSAPP and photographed by James Ewing for the exhibition "Stagecraft: Models and Photos". Image © James Ewing, Courtesy Columbia GSAPP

For a lot of architects, models hold a special place in our hearts. Whereas a building can take years to construct and usually can't be drastically altered as it nears completion, a model provides architects with the immediacy and flexibility we crave as designers while also allowing us to feel like we're really making something—a feeling that digital modeling software can rarely provide.

Models have even played decisive roles in the careers of many world-famous architects. Peter Zumthor, for example, is known to prefer the tactility of models over other forms of representation, while early in his career Steven Holl gained recognition for his visionary "Bridge of Houses" proposal for the Highline in New York, presented through a series of provocative models. And, physical models have even been key in some of the great advancements of the profession: In the 1990s, Frank Gehry's pioneering work in digital design involved tracing the forms of his digital models into CATIA software, whereas Frei Otto's models using soap films from the 1960s were key in his research into tensile structures.

Bring Chicago's Downtown to your Home or Office with this Kickstarter Campaign

14:00 - 6 January, 2018
Courtesy of Microscape
Courtesy of Microscape

Site models: they are intriguing and playful things by nature, making you feel like a giant looking down on a city. These miniature neighborhoods, however, are often large and bulky and only suited for architecture schools or offices. Imagine being able to have a site model in your home or office. Microscape has launched a Kickstarter to produce 1:5000 scale models of America’s Windy City, Chicago.

Hyper-Realistic Buildings That Can Fit on Your Desk

08:00 - 5 December, 2017
© Ben Neale for Joshua Smith
© Ben Neale for Joshua Smith

South Australian artist, Joshua Smith has created yet another true-to-life miniature, a locksmith shop in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The miniature was created for an exhibition at the Arcade Art Gallery in Kaohsiung called, ‘When the Sun Goes Down’ as part of the Streets of Taiwan festival. Miniaturist Joshua Smith selected the shop by using google maps, with supplemental reference photos taken by the gallery -- Joshua has not been to Taiwan, let alone the shop itself.

© Ben Neale for Joshua Smith © Ben Neale for Joshua Smith © Ben Neale for Joshua Smith © Ben Neale for Joshua Smith + 11

SOM Exhibits 30 Structural Skeleton Models Showing Evolution of Tall Building Design

14:00 - 17 September, 2017
SOM Exhibits 30 Structural Skeleton Models Showing Evolution of Tall Building Design, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

When it comes to tall building design, it’s often the structural system where the most groundbreaking innovations are made. Premiering this week in partnership with the Chicago Architecture Biennial is a new exhibition highlighting the innovative structural systems of an architecture firm that has completed their fair share of tall buildings: SOM.

Titled SOM: Engineering x [Art + Architecture], the exhibition uncovers the concepts and forms of the firm’s greatest achievements, including revolutionary tall buildings such as the John Hancock Building, the Willis Tower and the current world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. The exhibition reveals the research and thought processes through a range of media: hand-drawn sketches, interactive sculpture, immersive video, and most notably, a lineup of models at 1:500 showing the structural skeletons of 30 significant projects.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 25

Exhibition: Making Models

18:28 - 14 August, 2017
Exhibition: Making Models

Nine Toronto architecture studios and artist groups have been invited to propose ideas and prototypes in model form that foster analytical, conceptual, physical and tectonic frameworks for inhabiting and constructing urban space and the public sphere. They are: CN Tower Liquidation; LAMAS; Lateral Office; Nestor Kruger and Yam Lau; Mitchell Akiyama and Brady Peters; Public Studio; studio junction; Terrarea; and UUfie.

Produced in various scales that involve speculative, functional, representational and/or relational approaches, these architectural models, in response to the theme “Meet Me There”, take as their point of departure an exemplary public space – the Sir Daniel Wilson quad, an

Model-Making in Miniature: Ali Alamedy's Nostalgic and Painstakingly Precise Tiny Worlds

04:00 - 14 July, 2017
Model-Making in Miniature: Ali Alamedy's Nostalgic and Painstakingly Precise Tiny Worlds, Ali Alamedy's miniature worlds. Image via The New York Times
Ali Alamedy's miniature worlds. Image via The New York Times

Although trained as a Control and Computer Engineer, Ali Alamedy has since turned his hand to manufacturing scaled, miniature dioramas. After being forced to leave his home in Iraq, he and his family are now based in Turkey – and it is here that he has honed a skill in constructing these tiny, intricate worlds from a broad range of ordinary materials. All scaled at 1:12, these complex and often hyper-realistic models are inspired by the environments around him, complemented by his experiences and, of course, his imagination. In this study of Alamedy's work, ArchDaily asks: how do you do it?

"Italian Façade". Image © Ali Alamedy "New York City". Image © Ali Alamedy "Kid's Room". Image © Ali Alamedy "Pipes Warehouse". Image © Ali Alamedy + 24

9 Ideas for Presenting Your Project With Concrete Models

08:00 - 29 May, 2017
9 Ideas for Presenting Your Project With Concrete Models, Courtesy of David Rodriguez Arquitectos + Combeau & De Iruarrizaga Arquitectos
Courtesy of David Rodriguez Arquitectos + Combeau & De Iruarrizaga Arquitectos

Physical models have, for centuries, been a highly-effective way of explaining an architectural idea, allowing the audience to experience a concept in a plan, section, elevation and perspective all at once. However, a model can communicate so much more if you deviate from traditional cardboard materiality. If you want to express the monolithic massing of your latest scheme, or its expressive texture, then a model of plaster or cement may capture so much more than a digital rendering ever could. 

Creating a concrete model is profoundly engaging, as it forces us to follow a methodology similar to that of large-scale construction: make a mold / formwork, mix the cement or plaster with water, and then pour. When done correctly, the resulting model could stand as an architectural sculpture in its own right. 

Below, we have rounded up concrete models from the ArchDaily archives, giving you the inspiration to set your concrete model ideas in stone. 

Courtesy of ETB Studio Courtesy of Pezo von Ellrichshausen Courtesy of ELEMENTAL Courtesy of Enrique Morales Puente + 11

Bring New York's Never-Built Projects to Life With This Kickstarter

10:30 - 22 May, 2017
Bring New York's Never-Built Projects to Life With This Kickstarter, Buckminster Fuller Dome, 1961. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books
Buckminster Fuller Dome, 1961. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books

The “Never Built” world so far includes Never Built Los Angeles, a book and exhibit, and the book, Never Built New York. Now, the Queens Museum hopes to continue the exploration into the New York that might have been with a Never Built New York exhibition and has launched a Kickstarter campaign with a goal of $35,000 to make it happen. The exhibition, curated by Sam Lubell and Greg Goldin and designed by Christian Wassmann, will explore 200 years of wild schemes and unbuilt projects that had the potential to vastly alter the New York we know today.

Howe and Lescaze MoMA. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books Rufus Henry Gilbert's Elevated Railway. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Museum, 2000. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books SHoP, Flushing Stadium, 2013. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books + 7

45 Years of Architecture Model Photography in Spain

12:00 - 16 April, 2017
45 Years of Architecture Model Photography in Spain, International Design Competition for the José Batlle y Ordóñez Monument in Montevideo (Uruguay), 1959. Architect: Roberto Puig Álvarez. Sculptor: Jorge Oteiza. Image © Photographic Library of the Spanish Cultural Heritage Institute, Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. Oteiza Museum Archives
International Design Competition for the José Batlle y Ordóñez Monument in Montevideo (Uruguay), 1959. Architect: Roberto Puig Álvarez. Sculptor: Jorge Oteiza. Image © Photographic Library of the Spanish Cultural Heritage Institute, Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. Oteiza Museum Archives

138 images, 14 albums, 20 magazines, 13 original models and one projection are part of Modeling for the Camera: Photography of architectural models in Spain, 1925-1970, the current exhibition of the ICO Museum in Madrid, curated by Iñaki Bergera, PhD of Architecture from the University of Navarra.

The exhibition is tied to the book of the same name that was published in 2016, edited by La Fábrica and the Ministry of Public Works (Spain). In times when 3D visualization software has popularized, accelerated and perfected the rendering industry, both materials choose to value the legacy of architectural model photography in the 20th century.

Club Táchira, Caracas (Venezuela), 1956. Architects: Eduardo Torroja Miret and José Fructoso Vivas Vivas. Image © Modern construction archives- Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Alberto Sartoris. © García Moya Preliminary design outdoor gazebo for music band. National Prize of Architecture, 1962. Architect: Juan Daniel Fullaondo Errazu. Image © Paco Gómez Archive / Foto Colectania Foundation Headquarters of JORBA Laboratories, Madrid, 1965. Architect: Miguel Fisac ​​Serna. Image © C. Jiménez. Fisac ​​Foundation Torres Blancas, Madrid, 1969. Architect: Francisco Javier Sáenz de Oiza. Image © Collection Architectural College of Catalonia Historical Archives. Photography: L. Jiménez + 15

Micro-Scale Modeling: How to Construct Tiny, Intricate Worlds From Ordinary Materials

04:00 - 13 March, 2017
Micro-Scale Modeling: How to Construct Tiny, Intricate Worlds From Ordinary Materials, © Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram

Joshua Smith, a miniaturist and former stencil artist based in South Australia, constructs tiny, intricate worlds for a living. His work, which exhibits astonishing observational and representational skills, focuses on the "overlooked aspects of the urban environment – such as grime, rust and decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti," all recreated at a scale of 1:20. Smith, who has been making model kits for around a decade, only recently chose to move away from a 16-year-long career creating stencil art. With his creative talents now focused on model-making, and all those skills which accompany the craft, ArchDaily asks: how do you do it?

© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram © Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram © Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram © Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram + 19

These Intricate Architectural Models Will Change How You See Their Famous Full-Size Counterparts

09:30 - 19 February, 2017
These Intricate Architectural Models Will Change How You See Their Famous Full-Size Counterparts, © James Ewing, Courtesy Columbia GSAPP
© James Ewing, Courtesy Columbia GSAPP

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Kenneth Frampton on the Art & Artifice of Architectural Models."

For decades, students at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, & Preservation signed up for Kenneth Frampton’s legendary class, Studies in Tectonic Culture. The course tasked students with creating realistic representations of buildings “as a pedagogical exploration of the history of architectural tectonics”—and the models long spilled into the hallways of the architecture school before being hidden away in the archives.

Now, the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery has decided to pull some of these models out from obscurity and display them in a whole new light for the show Stagecraft: Models and Photos, which opened February 9th. Produced during the 1990s and early 2000s, the models are of significant 20th-century buildings around the world, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Samuel Freeman House to Peter Zumthor’s St. Benedict Chapel.

Parks and Rec, Suits, and Silicon Valley: See 7 Offices From Hit TV Shows in Detailed 3D Models

09:30 - 5 February, 2017
Parks and Rec, Suits, and Silicon Valley: See 7 Offices From Hit TV Shows in Detailed 3D Models

You've seen the floor plans of famous TV homes, but this fun new endeavor from Drawbotics is something a little different. With detailed 3D models of offices from Parks and Recreation, Suits, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Mad Men, The IT Crowd, Silicon Valley, and, yes, The Officethe marketing agency provides a new level of familiarity with the sets of these cult workplace TV shows. Take a break from your own office and check out each model after the break.

Video: Jan Gehl on Modernism and the Social Sciences

08:00 - 6 November, 2016

The Danish Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, curated by Boris Brorman Jensen and Kristoffer Lindhardt Weiss, is dense with models – "a wunderkammer of architectural prototypes." The exhibition, which attempts to present new insights into how contemporary Danish architecture has been influenced by critics of Modernism (the "Modern approach"), features Jan Gehl—a famed Danish architect and urbanist renowned for his focus on improving the quality of urban life—as its standard bearer. In this exclusive film, shared by the curators, Gehl puts forward his position.

12 Dollhouses That Trace 300 Years of British Domesticity

03:45 - 17 October, 2016
12 Dollhouses That Trace 300 Years of British Domesticity, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

As part of a new exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., twelve dollhouses tracing the history of British domesticity have been lent by London's Victoria & Albert Museum of Childhood. The show—Small Stories: At Home in a Dollhouse—spans 300 years and presents a miniature-sized, up-close-and-personal view of developments in architecture and design – from lavish country mansions, to an urban high-rise.

Whiteladies House (Moray Thomas, England, 1935). Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London Whiteladies House (Moray Thomas, England, 1935). Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London Jennys Home (Tri-ang, Northern Ireland, 1960s). Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London Betty Pinney’s House, set in 1910s (England, 1870). Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London + 63

Small Stories: 24 Architects, Artists and Designs Model Their Dream Houses in Miniature

06:30 - 13 October, 2016
Small Stories: 24 Architects, Artists and Designs Model Their Dream Houses in Miniature, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

As part of a new exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., a group of 24 American architects, designers and architects have been commissioned to create "dream homes" in the format of the contemporary dollhouse. Part of Small Stories: At Home in a Dollhouse, in which twelve historical dollhouses spanning the past 300 years from London's Victoria & Albert Museum of Childhood are being presented in the United States for the first time, these 21st Century interpretations intend to showcase a "diverse array of perspectives, demonstrating the limitless creativity of building in miniature."

Design Meditation Room / Marshall Moya Designs. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London The Cupboard Under the Stairs / Louise Krasniewicz. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London PEEPS Playing Poker / Rebecca Heaton and Suzan Maher. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London The Paper Trail / Patrick J. Baglino, Jr.. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London + 25

This is How Urban Agency Made a 150kg Concrete Model

10:00 - 9 August, 2016

As part of the Danish contribution to the 2016 Venice Biennale Urban Agency embarked on a challenging feat: the construction a 1:50 concrete model. The firm—based in Dublin, Copenhagen and Lyon—contributed three projects to the "Human Architectures" exhibition at this year's Danish Pavilion.

The video shows the careful, painstaking process of molding, setting and assembling the 150kg model. Urban Agency told ArchDaily,

Landscape as architecture / João Gomes da Silva and Paulo David

02:00 - 31 July, 2016
Landscape as architecture / João Gomes da Silva and Paulo David, © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Diogo Nunes © Stefano Serventi + 37

  • Architects

    João Gomes da Silva and Paulo David
  • Location

    Centro Cultural de Belém, Portugal
  • Exhibition

    Landscape as architecture - João Gomes da Silva and Paulo David
  • Área

    2124.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photography