All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Rendering

Rendering: The Latest Architecture and News

How to Render Parametric Designs & Animations Using V-Ray for Rhino & Grasshopper

 |  Sponsored Article

Everybody’s talking about Grasshopper. It’s an exciting way to explore parametric and generative designs in architecture — and the ability to create and render those concepts and animations to present to clients is considerably even more impressive.

V-Ray is a trusted 3D renderer that gives Rhino users the power to render everything, from quick concepts to finished designs. It also allows designers to deliver professional-quality renders every step of the way. V-Ray for Grasshopper comes with V-Ray for Rhino, which makes it quick and easy to animate and render your parametric designs.

Sneak a Peek at the New Features in Twinmotion 2020

 |  Sponsored Article

Real-time architectural visualization provides a compelling immediacy that helps stakeholders in architectural projects better understand unbuilt buildings. With the interactive architectural visualization tool Twinmotion, it’s now possible to transform BIM and CAD models into these convincing real-time experiences quickly and easily. Architectural designers benefit enormously from tools that are easy to learn and use, but they also want to create visualizations that provide a genuine sense of presence. Realism is the key to achieving this, a focus of the upcoming release of Twinmotion 2020.

In this article, we’ll provide a sneak peek at some of the new Twinmotion features.

Courtesy of Epic Games Courtesy of Epic Games Courtesy of Epic Games Courtesy of Epic Games + 5

Supercharging Workflows with Real-Time Visualization Tool Twinmotion

 |  Sponsored Article

Forward-thinking architectural firms, infrastructure consultancies, and interior design businesses are increasingly leaning on real-time architectural visualization to explore, evaluate, and present designs. By affording clients and project stakeholders the opportunity to experience future spaces in interactive and immersive environments, real-time technology provides a compelling immediacy that 2D drawings cannot. 

6 Easy Tutorials for Better SketchUp Renders

 |  Sponsored Article

V-Ray is an incredibly powerful renderer — but it’s also remarkably easy to use. The number-one* 3D renderer used in architectural visualization is battle-tested and industry-proven, used daily to realize world-class products, buildings and much more. And if you like to spend the majority of your time being creative but still crave the highest quality images possible, V-Ray can help you easily and speedily render everything from your quickest concepts to your largest and most detailed 3D models.

What’s more, it works seamlessly with SketchUp’s versatile 3D modeling tools while also being built with a full set of creative tools for lights and materials. The best part, perhaps, is that you don’t need to be a rendering expert to get great results with V-Ray. This collection of six, simple, quick-start tutorials will help you learn how to use V-Ray Next for SketchUp — and give your renders a boost in no time at all.

Let’s get started!

Courtesy of Chaos Group Courtesy of Chaos Group Courtesy of Chaos Group Courtesy of Chaos Group + 7

Répliques

To celebrate in its own way the 100 years of the Bauhaus,
the team of illustrators in architecture “sauvarjon”
has produced 100 illustrations for which an exhibition is still in preparation.

To celebrate in its own way the 10th anniversary of the opening of the Nantes School of Architecture on the banks of the “Ile de Nantes”,
the collective offers a great illustration contest, free, open to all
around the main theme of "Replica!"
and hopes to collect 100 illustrations from different authors, which will also be the subject of an exhibition and auction during the National Days of Architecture in October 2019.

The main and only

Real-Time Rendering for All of Us

By now, you’ve likely heard about real-time rendering for architectural visualization and how it’s changing the way designs are presented. With real-time rendering, you can edit your design and see the changes updated instantly, at full quality, and you can produce animations and panoramas in minutes instead of days. Real-time rendering also opens the door to immersive experiences like 360° videos and virtual reality.

Debunking 3 Myths about 3D Visualization and VR in Architectural Projects

 |  Sponsored Article

There’s a lot of buzz going on in terms of technology-driven innovation in the AEC industry. Especially the increasing use of 3D renderings and virtual reality for architectural projects is hitting every architect’s newsfeed. Photorealistic images and virtual reality walk-throughs seem to be turning into the new industry standard. That being said, for many architectural firms it seems to be hard to keep up with quickly developing new tech and thereby find ways to differentiate themselves from the competition.

An (ab)Normal Take on Architectural Representations

Contemporary visualization tools have rendered exceptional illustrations, proving to be crucial in architectural representations today. However, some choose to explore objects in unprecedented manners instead of diving into "digital post-collage", unleashing different realms of design.

Created as an experimentation of visual narratives, (ab)Normal is a graphic patchwork that expresses design, scenography, illustration, architectures, and social utopias of a culture that revolves heavily around Internet, gaming, and religion. The iconographic images, which particularly focus on architectural representation, explore all the potentials of rendering, deconstructing, and reassembling photo-realism with a different hierarchies.

Jesus. Image © (ab)Normal Omotesando. Image © (ab)Normal The Ten Reincarnations of the Self. Image © (ab)Normal Unleashed. Image © (ab)Normal + 11

The Complete City: Imagined - A Design Competition to Celebrate Portland, Maine

In 2017, the Portland Society for Architecture (PSA) asked citizens and visitors to provide their vision of Portland on blank maps of the city. PSA distributed these maps as a tool to encourage civic engagement in defining Portland. The completed maps offer unique perspectives and insight into how the city might grow and flourish.

5 Ways to Discuss Building Performance for Your Next Project Pursuit

 |  Sponsored Article

Today in the United States, buildings account for nearly 40% of carbon emissions (EESI) and 78% of electricity usage. The most sustainability-focused firms run energy simulations for less than 50% of their projects (10% for a typical firm) and only doing so late in the process when design changes are limited and insufficient to combat red flags found in the performance report (AIA 2030 report). We can make building performance widespread once we help the entire community discuss the subject in terms of investment and return. Especially during a project pursuit, since having the buy in from the whole team helps ensure the key project metrics are met. Owners are seeking out teams who are using actual metrics and data driven processes that affect their bottom line. This new approach to practice is what makes the younger teams’ standout and will benefit both the climate and the bottom-line. Here are 5 ways to talk about building performance in your project pursuits: 

A Library of 1000 High-Res Cutouts, Discounted for ArchDaily Readers

Swedish creative firm Studio Esinam has launched a new package from their cutout shop, offering an aid to architects and designers seeking to enliven renders and visualizations. The studio’s products, including these print elevations of iconic landmarks, are made in Sweden with an emphasis on eco-friendly materials.

The digital package, containing a diverse mix of 1000 cutouts, was created to cover a range of scenarios in daily life, including people biking, families, kids, business people as well as people dressed for all seasons. This week, ArchDaily readers are being offered a discount of £400 on the package that costs £695 by using the discount code ARCHDAILYSPECIAL at checkout here.

© Studio Esinam © Studio Esinam © Studio Esinam © Studio Esinam + 11

Trends in Architectural Visualization 2019: Storytelling with New Media

 |  Sponsored Article

Every year we see new tools and techniques for better, faster architectural visualization. The last few years have been a particularly exciting time because of advances in real-time rendering applications. When coupled with supporting technology like virtual reality headsets, projectors, and graphics cards, real-time photoreal rendering is putting stunning, dynamic visualization media within reach—mixed and augmented reality worlds, interactive configurators, game-like presentations—so architects and designers can truly tell their stories.

In Praise of Drawing: A Case for the Underrated Craft

© Jim Keen
© Jim Keen

I was part of the last generation of architectural students who didn't use computers (we’re only talking the early 1990’s here; there was electricity, color TV’s, rockets, just no renderings.) In my final year at college I miscalculated how long it would take me to finish my thesis project. As the deadline approached, I realized it was too late for me to match my fellow students’ presentations. At the time Zaha Hadid, and her deconstructivist paintings, set the style for architectural illustration. That meant many student projects being rendered in oil paints on large canvases.

Exploring Your Project in Virtual Reality: 7 Tips from the Experts Who Make It

Virtual reality offers benefits that, just years ago, were hardly even imaginable. Projects can be walked through before being built; the interiors fully visualized before all the details are decided. It allows architects and clients the ability to work as true collaborators in the design of a project.

How an Optimized Workstation Accelerates Your Design

Courtesy of BOXX
Courtesy of BOXX

Which processor? How many graphics cards? How much RAM? For architects, engineers, civil engineers, BIM managers, and other CAD pros, navigating the computer workstation marketplace can be an arduous task, hindered by unknowledgeable sales reps, inaccurate information, and other pitfalls.

From Romantic Ruins to the Ultra-Real: A History of the Architectural Render

Throughout history, architects have used sketches and paintings to display to their clients the potential outcomes of the projects rattling around their minds. Since Brunelleschi’s adoption of drawn perspective in 1415, architectural visualizations have painted hyper-realistic imaginings of an ideal, where the walls are always clean, the light always shines in the most perfect way, and the inhabitants are always happy.

With technological advances in 3D modeling and digital rendering, this ability to sell an idea through a snapshot of the perfect architectural experience has become almost unrestricted. Many have criticized the dangers of unrealistic renderings that exceed reality and how they can create the illusion of a perfect project when, in fact, it is far from being resolved. However, this is only the natural next step in a history of fantastical representations, where the render becomes a piece of art itself.

Below is a brief history of the interesting ways architects have chosen to depict their projectsfrom imagined time travel to the diagrammatic.

Ledoux, Theatre of Besançon Archigram's Walking City proposal. Image courtesy of Deutsches Architekturmuseum Gandy's Drawing of John Soane's Bank of England The Peak - 1983. Image © Zaha Hadid + 10

How 3D Renders Helped Trigger Life-Changing Development for an Indigenous Surinamese Community

Since 2015, the tribal community of Apetina in the south Suriname jungle have added a women’s center and seven chicken coops to their village, and there are plans underway to realize a high school, elevated treehouses for ecotourism, a visitor center, housing projects, chicken coops, and more.

Paul Spaltman is the one-man operation behind the designs of these structures, but “everything started with these nice renders made in Lumion," he explains. "It wasn’t enough to show 2D drawings or simply tell them what the project was going to be. When they saw the actual 3D renders, it helped them believe the project was possible. They already had the design. They could see the construction and that the entire project was, more or less, thought out. They could see that the project wasn’t just a dream, but one step further.”