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Augmented Reality: The Latest Architecture and News

What Is NFT Architecture and How Is It Different from Regular 3D Models?

Imagine yourself welcoming your colleagues to a business meeting at your home. The table is set next to the infinity pool, under the shadow of a huge curved metal structure reminiscent of Zaha Hadid's most audacious designs except for the complete absence of pillars. Hovering in the air, the roof completes an idyllic setting for this mansion on a rocky hillside. The house was recently acquired as an NFT and is digitally accessed via encrypted code. That's right, this is your virtual home. The physical one is a small 40m2 apartment in the center of one of the busiest and most polluted cities in the global south.

Layering of Realities: VR, AR, and MR as the Future of Environmental Rendering

Working remotely throughout the past year has accelerated the introduction of new approaches to real-time rendering, and with it, a new necessity was born: how can a person feel physically present inside a space, without actually being there? Ultimately, designers resorted to the virtual world, a vast realm of interactive built environments that can be accessed from the comfort of one's home. Even the tools utilized, such as headsets and goggles, have become more accessible to the vast majority of the public and are being sold at a lower price than they initially were. We have become accustomed to build, modify, and navigate between different environments, going back and forth between what is real and what isn't. Truth is, virtual has become the new normal.

© Matthew Daiter© Matthew Daiter© HighRock© Refik Anadol+ 11

How Will Digitalization and Remote Construction Change our Habits as Architects?

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Architects don’t make buildings. Architects make drawings of buildings. But of course, someone has to make the building. The construction industry is one of the largest economic sectors and we all interact with the built environment on a daily basis, but the actual work of getting a building from drawing to structure has barely evolved over the decades. While the rest of the world has moved into Industry 4.0, the construction sector has not kept pace. Architecture has begun to embrace some digitalization. After all, not many of us work with mylar on drafting tables anymore. So with the architecture industry’s everlasting link to the construction industry, will the latter pick up some new technological tricks by association? And when it does, how will that change the role of the architect?

How AR and VR Will Enhance the Future of the Sports Arena Experience

Throughout history, people from all walks of life with little in common have found ways to unite in neighborhood parks and filled stadiums to put those differences aside for the sake of the sports they love. Sports, and sports fandom, is a source of global unity, and perhaps fewer events in the world can generate such a wide range of emotions quite like a live match.

Material of the Future: 4 Architects that Experiment with Cross Laminated Timber

This article was originally published on The Architect's Newspaper as "Architects apply the latest in fabrication, design, and visualization to age-old timber."

Every so often, the field of architecture is presented with what is hailed as the next “miracle building material.” Concrete enabled the expansion of the Roman Empire, steel densified cities to previously unthinkable heights, and plastic reconstituted the architectural interior and the building economy along with it.

But it would be reasonable to question why and how, in the 21st century, timber was accorded a miracle status on the tail-end of a timeline several millennia-long. Though its rough-hewn surface and the puzzle-like assembly it engenders might seem antithetical to the current global demand for exponential building development, it is timber’s durability, renewability, and capacity for sequestering carbon—rather than release it—that inspires the building industry to heavily invest in its future.

A worm’s eye view of NN_House 1 reveals the back and forth between 3D neural network design and the limits of timber construction. Courtesy of Casey RehmThe design of the Meteorite allowed for both a monolithic exterior and an intimate interior and room for secondary spaces for installation and storage. Courtesy of Kivi SotamaaGilles Retsin and Stephan Markus Albrecht’s design for Nuremberg Concert Hall expresses the lightness of timber using 30-foot overhead CLT modules visible from the exterior.. Image© Filippo BologneseThe Wander Wood Pavilion was fabricated and assembled over three days to demonstrate the wide range of forms and applications timber can have when applied to robotic fabrication methods. Courtesy of David Correa+ 5

“We’re Building New Ways of Working”: Morphosis Explores XR and the Future of Design Technologies

Shifts in technology reflect how designers are creating experiences of architecture and cities. New advances engender novel ways of working, and in turn, shape our design process. As a practice defined by pushing boundaries, experimenting with workflows, and embracing new design technologies, Morphosis has a forty-year history of enthusiastically wondering at the future.

Atrium and liner at Kolon One & Only Tower in Seoul, Korea. Image Courtesy of Morphosis ArchitectsKolon One & Only Tower, featuring brise-soleil composed of varying FRC modules. Image Courtesy of Morphosis ArchitectsGFRC facade panel installation at the M-Bridge complex in Sejong City, Korea. Image Courtesy of Morphosis ArchitectsDigital mockup for Dessault Systemes x Morphosis installation at Milan Design Week 2019. Image Courtesy of Morphosis Architects+ 12

Morpholio Brings Iconic Furniture Designs to Life with Augmented Reality

Morpholio has unveiled a suite of new iconic furniture designs brought to life through augmented reality with Morpholio Board. Joining forces with manufacturer Knoll and one of the world’s top AR visualization companies, Theia Interactive, the team is showcasing a range of work from designers like Eero Saarinen and Marcel Breuer to Mies van der Rohe’s iconic Barcelona chair.

Courtesy of Morpholio, Theia Interactive and KnollCourtesy of Morpholio, Theia Interactive and KnollCourtesy of Morpholio, Theia Interactive and KnollCourtesy of Morpholio, Theia Interactive and Knoll+ 14

9 Augmented Reality Technologies for Architecture and Construction

A technological innovation is revolutionizing one of the oldest professions in the world. Augmented reality has just broken onto the scene and has already been transforming civil construction. The changes are seen not only in designing and modeling, but also in building. Augmented reality benefits the entire construction team: engineers, designers, architects, project managers and service providers.

Unlike virtual reality, which creates a totally new and independent environment of the real world, augmented reality includes virtual elements that interact with what already exists. It is thus possible to combine virtual architectural designs with the reality of the construction site, increasing efficiency and accuracy, reducing the occurrence of errors and saving time, money and resources.

Morpholio Unveils AR Sketchwalk, an Augmented Reality Tool to Immerse Users in Design

Morpholio has unveiled AR Sketchwalk, a new augmented reality tool geared towards helping architects bridge the gap between model and reality. Released today, AR Sketchwalk allows designers to use augmented reality to dive into their sketches to give both their clients and themselves a truer sense of the space.

David Adjaye and Serpentine Galleries Release Call for Augmented Reality Installation

The Serpentine Galleries, Google Arts & Culture and trustee David Adjaye have released a call for augmented reality (AR) architecture proposals to run alongside the 2019 Serpentine Pavilion this summer. Applicants are asked to propose "imaginary city spaces and speculations on the built environment to be developed and experienced” in AR onsite at the galleries. The call invites applicants to consider AR as a digital layer that offers new opportunities to design, visualize and experience.

Exploring Your Project in Virtual Reality: 7 Tips from the Experts Who Make It

Virtual reality offers benefits that, just years ago, were hardly even imaginable. Projects can be walked through before being built; the interiors fully visualized before all the details are decided. It allows architects and clients the ability to work as true collaborators in the design of a project.

The World's First Pavilion-Scale Structure Built Using Augmented Reality

Fologram has recently built the world’s first pavilion-scale steel structure using the HoloLens, displaying the possibilities of integrating standard CAD workflow with augmented reality. By displaying the generative design model through holographic instructions rather than traditional 2D drawings, it explores the potential of revolutionizing the bridge between design and construction.

Courtesy of FologramCourtesy of FologramCourtesy of FologramCourtesy of Fologram+ 11

5 Tech Innovations to Help Manage Project Data and Create New Ways of Designing

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication under the title "5 Technology Innovations Can Help Your Architecture Practice Work Smarter."

Before airplanes, it took mail carriers on horseback months to transport letters across the country. Before washing machines, it took a full day of physical exercise to wash and dry a family’s laundry. And before cranes, it took decades—sometimes centuries—to build large structures such as castles and cathedrals.

The point being: Whatever you do, technology probably gives you a better way to do it.

5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond

Even with tech like virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D printing, computational design and robotics already reshaping architecture practice, the design community is just scratching the surface of the potential of new technologies. Designers who recognize this and invest in building skills and expertise to maximize the use of these tools in the future will inherently become better architects, and position themselves for entirely new career paths as our profession evolves. It is a uniquely exciting moment for architecture to advance through innovative use of technology. Even just a decade ago, designers with interests in both architecture and technology were essentially required to pursue one or the other. Now, with architecture beginning to harness the power of cutting-edge technologies, these fields are no longer mutually exclusive. Rather than choose a preferred path, today’s architects are encouraged to embrace technology to become sought-out talent.

With much written about how technology is changing the way architects work and the products we can deliver to clients during a project’s lifecycle, there has been less focus on how technology is changing career opportunities in the profession. Architecture companies are now hiring roles that didn’t exist even three years ago. Here’s a look at five emerging career paths design technology will make possible in 2018 and the immediate future.

Morpholio's New AR Feature Makes Perspective Sketching Easier—And More Accurate—Than Ever Before

With the launch today of Apple's iOS 11—and with it, the release of the company's powerful system for augmented reality apps, ARKit—Morpholio has released a new update to their popular Trace app that allows users to sketch over photographs with perfect accuracy. While it has always been an option to sketch over photographs in Trace, the new "Perspective Finder" tool superimposes a scaled grid over the photograph that helps designers follow the perspective of the image and measure their drawings accurately.

© Morpholio© Morpholio© Morpholio© Morpholio+ 27

A New Generation of Tools: The 3D Visualization Multiplex

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A 3D visualization multiplex is a system to instantly visualize 3D models on multiple devices: desktop computers, smartphones, tablets, augmented reality gear, and virtual reality glasses.

It's an everyday tool to streamline conversations between architects, engineers, contractors, their clients, and the rest of the world.

With the formidable combination of CAD software programs - e.g. SketchUp or Revit - and a multiplex, 3D storytelling has never been simpler.

It works on both high-end immersive headsets and on smartphones with - or without - very capable $10+ glasses. Using augmented reality, a model can be directly integrated into the real world.