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Storytelling: The Latest Architecture and News

Architecture in Japanese Manga: Exploring the World of Jujutsu Kaisen

Manga is an umbrella term for a wide variety of comic books and graphic novels originally produced and published in Japan, and unlike western comic books that we may be more familiar with seeing printed in full color, are primarily published in black and white. Manga is the Japanese word for comics published in Japan, with the word itself comprising of two kanji characters: man (漫) meaning 'whimsical' and ga (画) meaning 'pictures'.

Not to be confused with the popular Japanese medium of anime, manga is print media whilst anime stands as visual media that is either hand-drawn or computer-produced, combining graphic art, characterization, cinematography, and other forms of creative and individualistic techniques. It is most notable that a lot of anime is developed as a result of a successful franchise that began as mere manga novels, but what continually unites the medium of manga and anime is the use of diverse art styles throughout various narratives that have been constructed for us consumers to follow.

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Visualizations as an Architectural Storytelling Tool

When we hear the term visualization, it’s likely that we picture a flashy render full of lights, people, dazzling finishes, and a sense of energy about the place that we are viewing. Aside from rendering a three-dimensional space, architects also need to develop their skills in the representation of intangible ideas that help drive the narrative behind their arguments. Instead of creating one-off concepts that are presented in a traditionally linear sequence, designers need to craft a story, structure their designs like a thesis, and consider how our presentations have the power to reveal the priorities of a project.

Let’s Talk About . . . Togetherness

We connect with our built environment through stories, most of which are passed down over time. Join us on November 19 for an exploration on how stories go missing, or how some perspectives remain below the radar. Community is built upon understanding and empathy. What changes as we bring different stories together?

Speakers:

Avnish Nanda / Legal Advisor
Michelle Robinson / Host of Native Calgarian
Despina Stratigakos / Architectural Historian


When: September 19, 2019; 6:30 p.m.
Where: Calgary Central Library, Patricia A. Whelan Performance Hall
Tickets: $12 advance, $6 students. $15 at doors.

www.dtalks.org

Architecture of Power: Short Story Award

Welcome to 2019; polarizing political views are an ever-present reality and it doesn't seem to be improving. Whether you live in the US or on the other side of the globe our environments are actors in the theater of influence. What happens when design becomes part of the equation? How does architecture and the built-environment play a role in the social and political lives of the people in power and those on the fringes?

Write a short story that puts into narrative how you think about architecture's role in power. How does it aid the status quo or give opportunity for