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Oklahoma: The Latest Architecture and News

Rand Elliott Architects design Oklahoma Contemporary's New Building

By Skyline Ink . Image Courtesy of Oklahoma ContemporaryBy Skyline Ink . Image Courtesy of Oklahoma ContemporaryBy Skyline Ink . Image Courtesy of Oklahoma ContemporaryBy Skyline Ink . Image Courtesy of Oklahoma Contemporary+ 10

Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center is relocating to a new building in the downtown area, designed by Rand Elliott Architects, a native firm of the city. This exhibition and educational center, originally a community-oriented arts center founded in 1989, will be open to everyone and free of charge, in order to facilitate the public access for art and education.

Bruce Goff’s Bavinger House Demolished with Little Warning

The Bavinger House, by famous US architect Bruce Goff, has been demolished, leaving no trace of its prior existence but an empty clearing amid Blackjack trees, reports Hyperallergic.

The Bavinger House is considered by many to be the crowning achievement of Bruce Goff, an esteemed architect who was once referred to by his mentor Frank Lloyd Wright as one of the few creative American architects. Its spiraling form and integration with the landscape was one of the first instances of modernist bio-mimicry.

2016 AIA Thomas Jefferson Award Given to Hans Butzer

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected Hans Butzer as the recipient of the 2016 Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture. The award recognizes excellence in architectural advocacy and achievement in the public realm. Learn more about Butzer, after the break.

EAA to Design Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center

Elliott + Associates Architects (EAA) has been commissioned to design the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center’s new home on 4.5 acre site at NW 11 and Broadway along Automobile Alley. Once complete, the new center will serve as a “gathering place for all ages to enjoy all forms of art” in addition to providing studios for artists, whether they are dancers, painters or ceramicists. More information, here.

Help Rebuild Moore

Recovery efforts are underway in the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore after a deadly, 1.3-mile-wide tornado carved a 20-mile-long swath of destruction through neighborhoods and schools on Monday afternoon. With winds up to 210 miles per hour and a death count that currently stands at 24, President Obama has declared this tornado to be “one of the most destructive in history,” ranking it at a Category 5.

In an effort to help, Architecture for Humanity and the American Institute of Architects (AIA) have mobilized their teams to provide instant assistance and aid in long term reconstruction efforts. Although professional design and construction volunteers from both organizations are already on the ground, the community needs your help. Find out how you can help the residents of Moore after the break.

TEDx: How to Build a Better Block / Jason Roberts

In this TEDx Talk, Jason Roberts – known as the “The Bike Guy” in his Oak Cliff community outside of Dallas, Texas – gives his audience a how-to guide in improving a community one block at a time as part of a project called “The Better Block“. The project did not start off as an organization with vast goals and strong following; instead it started off with Roberts’ interest and desire to develop his community into one that had a legacy apart from the highways and overpasses that dominate the landscape. Inspired by the rich history and existing street life of European cities with their historic buildings and monuments, plazas, and vistas; Roberts started small and eventually built a foundation and organization that is now nationally recognized and used as a tool to develop cities across the country.

Read on for more after the break.

Mine Plug: Didactic Subterranean Architecture

© Brandon Mosley
© Brandon Mosley

The Mine Plug proposal, by recent Louisiana Tech graduate Brandon Mosley, explores an innovative technique for appropriating a now defunct mine shaft in the once thriving city of Picher, Oklahoma. The city which peaked at a population of almost 20,000 during the mining boom of the 1900’s, has since suffered the inevitable after effects of such environmentally destructive activities. Designated as a superfund site in 1981 by the EPA, the state of Oklahoma began offering buyouts for residents to relocate in 2005. The remnants from years of lead and zinc mining have left mountains of waste called “chat” on the peripheries of the town, as well as contaminated water and over 14,000 underground voids that threaten the stability of the town above. Read more after the break.