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Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater Damaged from Flooding

16:30 - 21 July, 2017
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pablosanchez/3145407730/'>Flickr user pablosanchez</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user pablosanchez licensed under CC BY 2.0

Frank Lloyd Wright’s most famous house, Fallingwater, was the recipient of minor damage after heavy rainfall caused the creek that gives the house its name, Bear Run, to flood last weekend.

According to Fallingwater director Lynda Waggoner, a fallen log picked up by the overflow rammed into the stone wall of the lower plunge pool, breaking off the wall’s capstone and dislodging one of the home’s signature sculpture pieces, the Jacques Lipchitz’s “Mother and Child.” The cast bronze sculpture was selected for Fallingwater by Wright, and installed soon after its completion in 1939.

The 58-Year Evolution of Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum

09:30 - 22 June, 2017
The 58-Year Evolution of Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1959, with the original yellow-brown painted facade. Image © Robert E. Mates
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1959, with the original yellow-brown painted facade. Image © Robert E. Mates

This article originally appeared on guggenheim.org/blogs under the title "Wright’s Living Organism: The Evolution of the Guggenheim Museum," and is used with permission.

Standing on the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum construction site in 1957, architect Frank Lloyd Wright proclaimed, “It is all one thing, all an integral, not part upon part. This is the principle I’ve always worked toward.” The “principle” that Wright referred to is the design ideology that he developed over the course of his seventy-year career: organic architecture. At its core, that principle was an aspiration for spatial continuity, in which every element of a building would be conceived not as a discretely designed module, but as a constituent of the whole.

Although not Wright’s intention per se, it is fitting that the building he conceived of as a living organism has evolved over time. The overall integrity and character-defining spiral form have remained unchanged, but there have been a series of additions and renovations necessitated by the growth and modernization of the institution.

9 Incredibly Famous Architects Who Didn't Possess an Architecture Degree

09:30 - 19 June, 2017

Had the worst jury ever? Failed your exams? Worry not! Before you fall on your bed and cry yourself to sleep—after posting a cute, frantic-looking selfie on Instagram, of course (hashtag so dead)—take a look at this list of nine celebrated architects, all of whom share a common trait. You might think that a shiny architecture degree is a requirement to be a successful architect; why else would you put yourself through so many years of architecture school? Well, while the title of "architect" may be protected in many countries, that doesn't mean you can't design amazing architecture—as demonstrated by these nine architects, who threw convention to the wind and took the road less traveled to architectural fame.

Explore Frank Lloyd Wright's Curvaceous Unbuilt House Design for Marilyn Monroe

09:30 - 16 June, 2017

Some unbuilt designs—the hopes they reveal and the reasons they stayed unbuilt—tell a powerful story. So it is with the home Frank Lloyd Wright designed for Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller. Or perhaps it’s what we think we know about Marilyn that makes it so poignant?

The union between a quiet-living intellectual and the world’s greatest sex symbol was baffling to the public, and the conflict between their aspirations and personalities seems to have played out in their plans for this Connecticut home. After moving into Miller’s country retreat, Monroe asked Wright to design a new house for them on this vast piece of land.

This New Book Lets You Fold Your Own Paper Models of Iconic Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings

14:00 - 12 June, 2017
This New Book Lets You Fold Your Own Paper Models of Iconic Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings, Courtesy of Lawrence King Publishing
Courtesy of Lawrence King Publishing

With celebrations of Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday in full swing in architectural institutions throughout the country, a new book is giving Wright fanatics the chance to recreate some of the architect’s most notable works through a series of cut-and-fold paper models.

Created by paper engineer and artist Marc Hagan-Guirey, the book contains templates for creating 14 Wright-designed structures using the Japanese art of kirigami. The book leads you through the assembly of each model, which providing photographs, drawings and information for each building, including favorites like Fallingwater and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.

The New Yorker Cartoon That Accompanied the Opening of Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim

12:00 - 11 June, 2017
Courtesy of <a href='http://www.newyorker.com/'>The New Yorker</a>
Courtesy of The New Yorker

From wonderment to disgust, the opening of Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1959 was met with a wide range of reactions from the public. This profound cultural moment was distilled in a series of witty cartoons published in the New Yorker that simultaneously lampooned both the innovative architecture and its critics, which were recently shared in a blog post by the Guggenheim Museum. Through detailed sketches, cartoonist Alan Dunn represents the experience of the building, from staring into the exterior porthole windows to walking around the grand ramp. In one drawing he depicts the perspective from the first floor looking up at the dome, giving a sweeping sense of the curvature and geometries of the building.

In Seasonal Harmony - The Changing Nature of Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater

08:00 - 11 June, 2017

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of acclaimed American architect, visionary, and social critic Frank Lloyd Wright -considered by many to be one of the greatest architects of his time.

As a pioneer of the term 'organic architecture', one of his most iconic representative works is Fallingwater, set upon a waterfall in rural Pennsylvania. From its unveiling, the scheme has evoked enduring reflection on the relationship between man, architecture, and most prominently in Frank Lloyd Wright's mind - nature.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Early Blueprints of the Guggenheim Reveal Design Ideas That Didn't Make It

09:30 - 10 June, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright's Early Blueprints of the Guggenheim Reveal Design Ideas That Didn't Make It, 1953 section of the proposed Guggenheim Museum design. Image © 2017 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. All rights reserved.
1953 section of the proposed Guggenheim Museum design. Image © 2017 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. All rights reserved.

In a recent blog post from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, curator Ashley Mendelsohn explores unrealized design details from Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic design in New York City, based on blueprints and drawings from the museum’s archives. From large-scale questions of form to material choices, the 16-year period between the commission and the completion of the museum saw many design iterations. Most notable of these are the circulation paths drawn by Wright in the 1953 blueprints that include a steeper circular ramp—in addition to the "Grand Ramp"—that would allow for expedited access to the floors. Though replaced later with a triangular staircase, the "Quick Ramp" demonstrates Wright’s exploration of overlapping geometries.

Detail of the 1953 plan of the Guggenheim Museum that shows the proposed "quick ramp". Image © 2017 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. All rights reserved. Detail of the 1953 section of the Guggenheim Museum showing the proposed "quick ramp". Image © 2017 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. All rights reserved. 1953 plan of the proposed Guggenheim Museum design. Image © 2017 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. All rights reserved. The 1945 model of the Guggenheim, before the design was extended to 89th street. Image © 2017 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. All rights reserved. +6

26 Things You Didn't Know About Frank Lloyd Wright

08:00 - 10 June, 2017
© New York World-Telegram and the Sun staff photographer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
© New York World-Telegram and the Sun staff photographer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

150 years ago this month saw the birth of one of the most regarded, studied, influential architects of the twentieth century - American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. With a career spanning over seventy years, Wright developed his own distinct style of 'organic architecture', a new residential model of 'prairie house', as well as iconic schemes such as the Guggenheim in New York, and Fallingwater in Pennsylvania. 

More than an architect, Wright was a social critic and visionary, just as well-known for his personal life as he is for his architectural contributions. The various stages of Wright's career can be narrated in tandem with biographical episodes, as exemplified in the book "Lives built, Biographies of architects" by authors Anatxu Zabalbeascoa and Javier Rodríguez Marcos. In celebration of Wright's birthday and life, we have compiled a list of biographical details to give you an insight into the man behind some of the twentieth century's most enduring pieces of architecture. 

This is what we discovered.

"Inspirational" Frank Lloyd Wright Quotes for Every Occasion

09:30 - 8 June, 2017
"Inspirational" Frank Lloyd Wright Quotes for Every Occasion

It's no secret that Frank Lloyd Wright was among the architecture profession's more colorful characters. Known as an outspoken and often unforgiving egotist, Wright's appreciation of architecture was outshone only by his appreciation for himself—which is perhaps understandable, given that he ranks among the 20th century's great geniuses. For better or worse (probably worse), Wright's reputation has clung to the profession, thanks in large part to Ayn Rand, who used Wright as inspiration for the incorrigible lead character of one of her most famous books, The Fountainhead.

But in truth, most architects have at least a little of Frank Lloyd Wright's personality contained within their own. It's difficult to have self-confidence without a shred of ego, and since design requires a lot of self-confidence, many of us can relate—if only occasionally—to the outrageous attitude of The United States' greatest architect. In honor of Frank Lloyd Wright's 150th birthday today, we've collected some of Wright's most "insightful" comments and turned them into posters that can inspire you no matter what life throws at you. Now, take your humility, lock it in a tiny box deep inside your mind, and join us on a journey through 150 years of wisdom...

Tour Frank Lloyd Wright's Final (Unbuilt) House Design With this 3D Model

06:00 - 8 June, 2017

The last house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright was never built, with its plans being delivered to the client just days after Wright’s funeral. But the realization of his vision is tantalizingly possible, as those plans, and the parcel of land it was designed for, are still held by the same family—and are for sale, along with the adjoining plot and an existing Wright house.

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

02:30 - 8 June, 2017
Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

S.C. Johnson and Son Administration Building. Image © Jeff Dean Unity Temple. Image © Sean Marshall Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/57537089@N00/198494302/'>Flickr user gomattolson</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> +25

LEGO's Latest Landmark: Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum in New York

12:15 - 5 June, 2017
LEGO's Latest Landmark: Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum in New York, via Target
via Target

As the 150th Anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright's birth approaches, LEGO has released the latest kit in their architecture series: Wright's New York masterpiece, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The 744-piece set features a new rendition of the building made from the classic plastic blocks, following a 208-piece interpretation released in 2009. The new set provides a much more realistic portrayal of the Wright's original building as well as the 10-story limestone tower added by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects in 1992 (based on Wright's original sketches).

Inside the Bizarre Personal Lives of Famous Architects

09:30 - 29 May, 2017
Inside the Bizarre Personal Lives of Famous Architects, From left: © Robert C. Lautman; <a href='http://https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alvar_Aalto1.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain); Photograph by Al Ravenna <a href='http://https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
From left: © Robert C. Lautman; via Wikimedia (public domain); Photograph by Al Ravenna via Wikimedia (public domain)

Famous architects are often seen as more enigma than person, but behind even the biggest names hide the scandals and tragedies of everyday life. As celebrities of a sort, many of the world's most famed architects have faced rumors and to this day there are questions about the truth of their private affairs. Clients and others in their studios would get a glimpse into an architect’s personal life, but sometimes the sheer force of personality that often comes with creative genius would prevent much insight. The fact remains, however, that these architects’ lives were more than the sum of their buildings.

When Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier Had a Public Argument in The New York Times

09:30 - 26 May, 2017
When Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier Had a Public Argument in The New York Times, Left: Frank Lloyd Wright photographed by Al Ravenna. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> in Public Domain. Right: Le Corbusier. Image © Willy Rizzo
Left: Frank Lloyd Wright photographed by Al Ravenna. Image via Wikimedia in Public Domain. Right: Le Corbusier. Image © Willy Rizzo

Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier are both architects who were known for their grand and innovative ideas—as well as for their high esteem for their own opinions. The two did not, however, see eye to eye in their visions for the future of American cities and civilization. Both architects had utopian, all-encompassing plans for their ideal American city, combining social as well as architectural ideas. In 1932, both described these ideas in The New York Times; in these two articles Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier made their differing beliefs perfectly clear to the public.

Organic Architecture Beyond Frank Lloyd Wright by Aaron G. Green

05:30 - 22 May, 2017
Organic Architecture Beyond Frank Lloyd Wright by Aaron G. Green

Aaron G Green FAIA was an internationally known organic architect of “striking originality and grace.” His diversi ed architectural works include commercial, industrial, municipal, judicial, religious, interment, mass housing, and educational projects. Aaron Green taught advanced architectural design at Stanford University Department of Architecture for fifteen years.In the early 1940s, Aaron Green became a member of Frank Lloyd Wright’s apprentice group, the Taliesin Fellowship. He maintained a close relationship with Frank Lloyd Wright over the next 20 years.

Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold

04:30 - 22 May, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) is the most renowned and popular architect and designer in America. His buildings, including Fallingwater and New York's Guggenheim Museum, are iconic landmarks. Now you can create 14 of his best loved buildings using the art of kirigami (cutting and folding).

Each project features step-by-step instructions and a template that you remove from the book. You follow the lines on the template, cutting and folding to make your own model. All you need is a craft knife, a cutting mat, and a ruler. Clear cutting tips help you with the tricky stages, while photos of the finished

Frank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration

16:43 - 28 April, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration

The Guggenheim celebrates Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birth year kicking off on Thursday, June 8, Wright’s 150th birthday, with a special reduced admission of $1.50. Visitors will be treated to free birthday cupcakes in the Guggenheim’s newly renovated Cafe 3, which will feature large-scale, rarely seen photographs of the museum during its construction. An actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright will be on-site engaging with visitors between 9 am and 1 pm.