© Fearless Photography
© Fearless Photography

Find a New Life for Your Old Cardboard with these Geometric DIY Halloween Masks

Grab your cardboard, parcel tape, and model building skills: halloween masks are no longer just for witches and warlocks, but for architects too. A furniture designer turned mask creator based in the United Kingdom has created a series of geometric masks for the creatively inclined, available as a template online. A great way to use up leftover model-making materials, the masks were designed “to create a set of masks that could be built by anyone using local materials removing the need for mass manufacturing or shipping and with the minimum environmental impact,” says their creator Steve Wintercroft.

Redondeado / Carolina González Vives

© Miguel de Guzmán

Architects: Carolina Gonzalez Vives
Location: , ,
Project Architect: Carolina Gonzalez Vives
Project Area: 350.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Photographs: Miguel de Guzmán

Strato Office Block / Hardel et Le Bihan Architectes

© Vincent Fillon

Architects: Hardel et Le Bihan Architectes
Location: Boulevard Pereire, , France
Area: 12500.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Vincent Fillon

Collective Housing in Baró Tower / MiAS Architectes

© Adrià Goula

Architects: MiAS Architectes
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Project Area: 5000.0 m2
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Adrià Goula

The Courtyard House Plugin / People’s Architecture Office

Courtesy of People’s Architecture Office

Architects: People’s Architecture Office
Location: Chamber of Commerce of Dashilar Liulichang of Xicheng District, , Xicheng, , , 100000
Area: 60.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of People’s Architecture Office

Bauhaus Architects And Associates’s Office / Bauhaus Architecs & Associates

© Le Anh Duc – AIF STUDIO

Architects: Bauhaus Architecs & Associates
Location: Đối diện Sông Hồng building, , Hanoi, Vietnam
Architect In Charge: Dung Trung Tran
Design Team: Hoang Huy Nguyen, Thai Dinh Nguyen
Area: 90.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Le Anh Duc – AIF STUDIO

ODA Aims to Bring “Qualities of Private House” to Multi-Family Housing in Brooklyn

©

ODA Architecture has shared with us “510 Driggs,” a multi-family residential project that aims to provide residents with the “qualities of a private house” within ’s dense urban landscape. Each of the six-story building’s 100 units will be equipped with a large, functional outdoor space and at least two exposures to maximize light and air.

Farmers Park / Hufft Projects

© Mike Sinclair

Architects: Hufft Projects
Location: , MO, USA
Creative Director: Matthew Hufft
Managing Director: Kimball Hales
Area: 156400.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Mike Sinclair

These Collapsible Paper Models Help Museum-Goers Navigate the Rijksmuseum

Paper Pathfinder. Image © MVO&

Marijin van Oosten of MVO& has revolutionized the way visitors navigate museums: The Dutch graphic designer has designed a collapsible, 3D paper model of Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum to help ease visitor confusion through the 19th century museum’s 100 rooms. Dubbed the “Paper Pathfinder,” the innovative concept was awarded a Dutch Design Award this week. 

An image of the Paper Pathfinder collapsed, after the break.

Wirtschaftspark Breitensee / HOLODECK Architects

© Wolfgang Thaler

Architects: HOLODECK Architects
Location: Goldschlagstraße 172, 1140 ,
Area: 30300.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Wolfgang Thaler

Fentress Releases Final Design for Miami Beach Convention Center

© Fentress Architects

Fentress Architects has released plans for the $500 million redesign of the Beach Convention Center. The news follows the City of ’s controversial decision to nix plans provided by OMA, who was originally awarded the commission after a high profile competition against BIG.

Fentress will be working with Arquitectonica and West 8 on a significantly scaled-down that will include the renovation of the 500,000-square-foot exhibition hall and 200,000-square-feet of existing meeting space, as well as a new 80,000-square-foot ballroom and outdoor event space.

Corporate Headquarters / Moody Nolan

© Brad Feinknopf

Architects: Moody Nolan
Location: , OH, USA
Area: 39000.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Brad Feinknopf

SCAPE Wins 2014 Buckminster Fuller Challenge with Climate Change Adaptation Plan

© SCAPE

“Don’t fight forces, use them.” - R. Buckminster Fuller

SCAPE’s comprehensive climate change adaptation and community development project, Living Breakwaters has been announced as winner of the 2014 Fuller Challenge, “socially responsible design’s highest award.” Announced by the Buckminster Fuller Institute (BFI), the proposal was selected over seven shortlisted humanitarian initiatives and will receive a $100,000 prize for their innovative solution to solve one of humanity’s most pressing problems.

“Living Breakwaters is about dissipating and working with natural energy rather than fighting it. It is on the one hand an engineering and infrastructure-related intervention, but it also has a unique biological function as well. The project team understand that you cannot keep back coastal in the context of climate change, but what you can do is ameliorate the force and impact of 100 and 500 year storm surges to diminish the damage through ecological interventions, while simultaneously catalyzing dialog to nurture future stewards of the built environment,” said Bill Browning of Terrapin Bright Green, a 2014 senior advisor and jury member.

More on Living Breakwaters, after the break.

Architect Develops the World’s First Hoverboard

© Hendo via Kickstarter

Architects can do far more than design buildings. In fact, some of history’s most acclaimed innovators were not only architects, but also inventors. Leonardo da Vinci himself, the epitome of the Renaissance man, sketched buildings alongside ideas for flying machines. Buckminster Fuller was the ultimate futurist and invented the geodesic dome in addition to his Dymaxion Car, an automobile that was far ahead of its time. Now, an architect has developed “the world’s first hoverboard,” and the has far-reaching implications for not only transportation, but also buildings themselves. Read on after to break to learn more about what this could mean for the future.

Médiatheque de Monterblanc / Studio 02

© Luc Boegly

Architects: Studio 02
Location: ,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Luc Boegly

How I Built A New China: A talk with Expo 2010 Planner Siegfried Zhiqiang Wu

The main entrance of the Shanghai 2010 Expo. Image © Weixuan Wei

“We need a new generation of cities in ” -

As the tide of urbanization sweeps across most of the developing areas in China, the building frenzy has become a Chinese phenomenon. Some people are making money from it, some people are getting power from it, and some people are worrying about it. Recently, a new set of policies and reports have been published by the Chinese central government, and the whole society seems to be boosted by the new talk of a Chinese Dream. But, what is really happening inside China? Can it absorb this enormous growth? And, will urbanization continue in a proper way?

As the chief planner of the 2010 Shanghai Expo, Siegfried Zhiqiang Wu has been deeply involved for years in many of China’s main urbanization projects. It was almost midnight when we met Professor Wu in Shanghai, and although Wu had just gotten off a night flight from Beijing, his passion, frankness and intelligence remained undoubtedly impressive. In the following edited talk with interviewer Juan Yan, Professor Wu discusses China’s dramatic urbanization, its architectural culture and the future of smart cities.

A1 House / A1Architects

© David Maštálka

Architects: A1Architects
Location: ,
Architects In Charge: Lenka Křemenová, David Maštálka
Area: 220.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: David Maštálka

Iberê Camargo Foundation: Standards and Variations

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

It could have been a rectangular prism whose length measures forty-one meters and a half, whose width measures thirty-three meters, and whose height measures twenty-five meters. It could have been, if the projection had ended in the trace of a pure rule. It could have been almost the same: three elevated plans, each formed by three rectangular exhibitions rooms, placed at two consecutive faces and connected by ramps that run on the two other faces. Then, a four-story-high atrium rises between circulations and rooms, creating a diagonal symmetry inside the building.