“Jellyfish Barge” Provides Sustainable Source of Food and Water

Exterior View. Image © Matteo De Mayda

With the earth’s population increasing at an exponential rate, sustainable agriculture and access to clean water are becoming desperately important. Cristiana Favretto and Antonio Giraridi of Studiomobile recognize this and have proposed a solution. Dubbed the Jellyfish Barge for its shape and translucency, this floating greenhouse is capable of growing its own food hydroponically and producing up to 150 liters of fresh drinking water per day. Even more beneficial is its low-cost, easy-to-assemble design that can be implemented in a variety of locations. Learn more about how this fascinating project works, after the break.

Suburbian Villa / Deamicisarchitetti

© L. Bartoli

Architects: Deamicisarchitetti
Location: 27027 Pavia, Italy
Area: 460.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: L. Bartoli

Video: Harvard Art Museums Construction Time-Lapse

Harvard Art Museums have released this video of their recently completed four-year renovation and expansion project carried out by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Payette. Filmed from June 2010 – November 2014, the video shows the amount of work that went into renovating, expanding and uniting the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum under the same roof. Watch as snow falls (and then melts) on the construction site in the full video above and learn more about the project here.

Opinion: It Doesn’t Matter Who Owns Public Plazas

The dramatic entrance to the Richard Rogers-designed Leadenhall Building in London ostensibly invites pedestrians walking on the ground-level public plaza upwards. The building, however, is not so easily accessed. Image © Flickr CC User Matt Brown

When it comes to , many assume that while truly is always good, “privately owned ” is always bad. However, in this article originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “A Plaza is No Guarantee of Democracy,” NBBJ’s Carl Yost argues that the distinction is not so binary. As architects, it’s our job to smooth over the difference between the two, while we’re at work – but most importantly while we’re not.

The past few months have seen the opening of high-profile projects with contested public space. The Leadenhall Building, London’s “Cheesegrater,” rises above a public plaza that the Financial Times called “problematic,” with “an astonishing array of defensive measures to make it clear that while it may be open to the public, it is still ours” (that is, the landlord’s). In New York, the World Trade Center plaza has taken fire from critics, both domestic and international, who chafe at restrictions on visitors’ behavior.

It evokes the debate over “privately owned public space,” or POPS, that arose during Occupy Wall Street, when protesters camped out in Zuccotti Park, a Lower Manhattan plaza that is privately owned by Brookfield Office Properties yet must remain open to the public. Many rightly pointed out the restrictions that POPS pose to free speech and assembly, when owners can evict people they consider unwelcome.

Y111 Hotel / Estudio FWAP Arquitectos

© Gonzalo Viramonte

Architects: Estudio FWAP Arquitectos
Location: Córdoba, , Argentina
Project Area: 6677.0 m2
Photographs: Gonzalo Viramonte

Defining Place: Alternative Urban Futures from The Neighbourhood

Courtesy of The Neighbourhood

3D printing technology is quickly emerging as a technology that could be applied at the scale of the built environment. But could we use 3D printed materials to create engaging urban spaces that are constantly changing? Creative communications agency, The Neighbourhood, has imagined speculative architecture based on 3D printed materials.

Last Is More: The Miesian Lesson

Courtesy of The Images Publishing Group

The following is an excerpt from Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago. The Langham Hospitality Group commissioned architectural photojournalists Robert Sharoff and William Zbaren to document the transformation of eminent architect Mies van der Rohe‘s IBM Building — the last skyscraper he designed — into The Langham, . In this chapter, Sharoff and Zbaren provide a more detailed look into the period between 1965 and 1975, when Mies’s influence on ’s skyline was at its most pervasive.

The construction of the IBM Building occurred midway through a legendary period in Chicago architecture—the decadelong building boom between 1965 and 1975, when Mies’s influence on the city’s skyline was at its most pervasive.

During these years, numerous Miesian structures by firms such as Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, C. F. Murphy Associates, and Loebl, Schlossman & Bennett were erected, and the city’s reputation as the founder of American modernism was finally and firmly established. The best of those buildings continue to dominate the skyline.

Designers Explore an Entirely New Use for Shipping Containers in Seoul’s Design District

Information kiosk. Image Courtesy of NL Architects

Fashion, design and architecture collide in Zaha Hadid’s recently completed Dongdaemun Design Plaza, one South Korea‘s most popular tourist destinations. Commissioned by the Design Plaza’s Supervisor of Young Joon Kim of yo2 Architects, the latest development for the plaza is a series of compact kiosks designed to activate the expansive  surrounding the new building. One of ten teams invited to submit ideas for these new kiosks, Amsterdam-based NL Architects developed a series of impermanent but practical solutions for the plaza. Using new methods for reuse of standard shipping containers, the team proposed a host of kiosks, with two of their designs – an information booth and a miniature exhibition space – being accepted for construction.

See all of NL Architects’  Zaha-inspired shipping container kiosks after the break

VA House / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa

© Manuel Aguiar

Architects: Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: José António Lopes da Costa, Tiago Meireles
Co Workers: Joana Jorge
Year: 2013
Photographs: Manuel Aguiar

Sderot Train Station / Mann Shinar Architects

© Albatross Aerial Perspective

Architects: Mann Shinar Architects
Location: Sderot,
Architects In Charge: Ami Shinar, Amir Mann
Area: 3500.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Albatross Aerial Perspective, Dana Polo, Shay Adam, Gal Deren

Fitting in the Protection Zone in Strebersdorf / Abendroth Architekten

Courtesy of Abendroth Architekten

Architects: Abendroth Architekten
Location: 7361 ,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Abendroth Architekten

Erskineville Studio / Pivot

© Justin Alexander

Architects: Pivot
Location: Erskineville NSW,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Justin Alexander

Winning Proposals “Reanimate the Ruins” of Detroit’s Packard Motor Plant

Ecological Engineering Center . Image Courtesy of

Parallel Projections has announced the winners of the Reanimate the Ruins competition, an international challenge to redesign and memorialize Detroit’s historic Packard Motor Plant. The competition called for designers to simultaneously honor Detroit’s history, while envisioning a future of technological, social, and aesthetic healing.

This year’s jury has selected three winners and six honorable mentions. Read more after the break to explore the award-winning proposals.

The Ulrichshof / noa

Courtesy of

Architects: noa*
Location: Bolzano, Bolzano,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of noa*

Powerhouse Company and De Zwarte Hond Selected to Redesign Assen Station

Entrance . Image © and De Zwarte Hond

Powerhouse Company and De Zwarte Hond (Team A) have won an international competition to redesign the railway station in the Netherlands. The winning scheme, marked by a triangular latticed canopy, is designed to reconnect the east and west side of the city with an “inviting and recognizable” transit hub.

Denver Library, South Elevation, 1994, pencil and colored pencil on yellow tracing paper, 14 x 26 inches. Image Courtesy of Michael Graves & Associates, photo: Ken Ek
Denver Library, South Elevation, 1994, pencil and colored pencil on yellow tracing paper, 14 x 26 inches. Image Courtesy of Michael Graves & Associates, photo: Ken Ek

In Honor of Michael Graves, The Architectural League Revisits 200 Years of Drawing

With their “Past as Prologue“ symposium – a day of lectures celebrating fifty years of Michael Graves‘ career - approaching tomorrow, the Architectural League of New York is taking a look back at one of its seminal exhibitions which heavily featured Graves’ work. When “200 Years of American Architectural Drawing” launched in 1977, New York Times critic Ada Louise Huxtable said “By any definition… a major show,” adding “here is architecture as it comes straight from the mind and the eye and the heart, before the spoilers get to it.” In memory of the show, the Architectural League has published a selection of essays and images from the accompanying book, including the work of Graves, Peter EisenmanJohn Hejduk and Richard Meier.

Check out the Architectural League’s collection of 200 Years of American Architectural Drawing here, and don’t forget to tune in to the livestream of the Past as Prologue symposium here at 9.30 EST on Saturday.

Revitalizing Olmsted Center / BKSK

Courtesy of

Architects: BKSK
Location: Parks Department, 156th, , NY 10455, USA
Architect In Charge: Joan Krevlin
Design Team: Harpreet Dhaliwal, Jennifer Preston, Christian Eusebio, Ivan Chabra
Photographs: Courtesy of BKSK

Career Insights: IE School of Architecture & Design

Career Insights: IE School of Architecture & Design

Career prospects in Architecture, Engineering, Construction and Interior Design have changed profoundly in nearly half a decade. We believe that practices that are global enough are finding great opportunities in this evolution, and that professionals that are excellent in design…