Piazza Garibaldi / Dominique Perrault Architecture

© Peppe Maisto

Architects: Dominique Perrault Architecture
Location: Piazza Garibaldi, 80142 Naples,
Area: 21000.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Peppe Maisto , Courtesy of DPA / Adagp

Video: A Drone’s-Eye View of Apple’s New Campus Under Construction

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At the moment it may be little more than a colossal, doughnut-shaped hole in the ground, but this video is in fact the first glimpse of Apple‘s new Norman Foster-designed Campus in Cupertino. The video, shot using a GoPro camera mounted on a drone, shows that construction of the building’s huge underground parking garage has begun, with concrete poured in a section of the trench. And, as we’ve come to expect from , the fact that it’s a construction site is no excuse for messiness, meaning that elements of the design are already starting to be legible, such as a wider trench marking the main entrance close to the drone’s position. Watch the video above to see the huge campus under construction, and read on after the break for more information about the building’s design.

Casa Avenal / Carlos Castanheira

© Fernando Guerra – FG+SG

Architects: Carlos Castanheira
Location: Avenal, 3720,
Architect In Charge: & Clara Bastai, Arqtos Lda
Design Team: Hellen van het hart, Sofia Reis, Duarte Rodrigues, Demis Lopes, Luís Calheiros
Photographs: Fernando Guerra – FG+SG

Olson Kundig Architects Reinvents Site of Expo ’74 World’s Fair for 40th Anniversary

Concept design for reuse of U.S. Federal Pavilion. Image Courtesy of

Forty years ago, the Expo ’74 World’s Fair opened in Spokane, Washington to great fanfare as the world’s first environmentally themed Expo. Perhaps equally as momentous, the former Soviet Union participated for the first time since World War II, and 5.6 million people attended throughout the course of the six month long Fair. This year, Olson Kundig Architects, led by design principal Tom Kundig, partnered with the City of to reinvent the original park with new concept designs for its structures, program, and facilities.

UNIQLO Le Marais / Wonderwall

© Hufton+Crow

Architects: Wonderwall
Location: 39 Rue des Francs-Bourgeois, 75004 Paris,
Area: 800.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Hufton+Crow

Understanding St Louis: The Activism of Bob Hansman

Pruitt Igoe was just one step of the process that led to St Louis

For the past few weeks,  in Ferguson, Missouri have prompted many debates over what can or should be done to ease tensions in this suburb of St Louis. But Bob Hansman, a professor at the Washington University in St Louis, is taking a different approach: understanding it first. This interview with Hansman, originally published on the Washington University in St Louis Newsroom, unearths a few of the issues that have made some areas of St Louis so severely dispossessed.

It’s 10am, and Bob Hansman is on a bus addressing , brandishing a St. Louis guidebook like a prosecutor at trial.

“Today isn’t this,” he growls. “Get ready.”

Discover more about the work of Hansman after the break.

Home Cafes / Penda

© Zhi Xia

Architects: Penda
Location: Beijing, Beijing,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Zhi Xia, Fei Tang Precht

Open Call for Curator: Oslo Architecture Triennale 2016

Courtesy of Architecture Triennale

Oslo Architecture Triennale (OAT) seeks a Chief Curator or Curator Team for its sixth international festival in Oslo, Norway in autumn of 2016. The Curator will be responsible for the academic and artistic development of the festival, including its conceptual framework, research and programming, as well as exhibitions and events.

The Oslo Architecture Triennale serves as a platform for developing alternative and interdisciplinary projects and is the main international architecture festival in the Nordic region. Content will be developed over the course of three years, and the festival functions to not only display, but to investigate issues of architecture and urban challenges. More on the triennale, and how to apply, after the break.

Rahul Mehrotra's designs for an office building in Hyderabad exemplify the social agenda of architecture which dominated discussions at this year's UIA World Congress. Image © Carlos Chen
Rahul Mehrotra's designs for an office building in Hyderabad exemplify the social agenda of architecture which dominated discussions at this year's UIA World Congress. Image © Carlos Chen

UIA World Congress Reveals Architecture’s Other Side

With the International Union of Architects (UIA)’s World Congress taking place last month, the eyes of the architecture world were on South Africa where - according to Phineas Harper of the Architectural Review - the conference was full of architects of all backgrounds with “irrepressible energy,” sharing ideas on how architecture can be used for social good with an urgency that is somewhat unfamiliar in the Western world. ”Whoever said architecture was stale, male and pale should have been in Durban,” says Harper. You can read the full review of the event here.

Building of Construction Engineering Disciplinary Organization / Dayastudio + Nextoffice

© Parham Taghioff

Architects: Dayastudio, Nextoffice
Location: , Iran
Architects In Charge: Parisa Alimohammadi, Alireza Taghaboni
Area: 2500.0 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Parham Taghioff

Umayyad Mosque, Old City of Aleppo, Syria (2013).
Umayyad Mosque, Old City of Aleppo, Syria (2013).

The Proliferation of “Cultural Genocide” in Areas of Conflict

In an article for the London Evening Standard, Robert Bevan examines one of the many often overlooked consequences of conflict: the destruction of monuments, culture, and heritage. With heightened conflict in the Middle East over the past decade an enormous amount of “cultural genocide” has occurred – something which Bevan notes is “inextricably linked to human genocide and ethnic cleansing.” Arguing that “saving historic treasures and saving lives are not mutually exclusive activities,” case studies from across the world are employed to make the point that with the loss of cultural heritage, most commonly architectural, the long term ramifications will resonate throughout this century.

Timber Dental Clinic / Kohki Hiranuma Architect & Associates

© Satoshi Shigeta

Architects: Kohki Hiranuma Architect & Associates
Location: , Osaka Prefecture,
Architect In Charge: Kohki Hiranuma
Area: 144.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Satoshi Shigeta, Courtesy of Kohki Hiranuma Architect & Associates

Family house Kostalov / 3+1 architekti

© Pavel Plánička

Architects: 3+1 architekti
Architect In Charge: Plánička, Panenka, Páral
Area: 155.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Pavel Plánička

Beret / y+M

© Yohei Sasakura / Sasa no kurasya

Architects: y+M
Location: Kagawa Prefecture,
Photographs: Yohei Sasakura / Sasa no kurasya

Elenberg Fraser Reveals Designs for Melbourne’s Tallest Residential Tower

Courtesy of Golden Age Group

Elenberg Fraser Architects have revealed designs for what is slated to be Melbourne’s tallest residential tower. The project seeks to reinvent the natural landscape of ’s Victoria state in an urban setting, through an optically transformative facade and botanical aesthetic.

This Whimsical Cage Redefines Public Space

Courtesy of Warren Techentin Architecture

Folly is a word not often used in architecture. By definition, ‘folly’ is a lack of good sense, or foolishness. And in the realm of architecture, folly is used to describe an extravagantly ornamented structure with no practical purpose. Yet gathering their inspiration from this word, Warren Techentin Architecture (WTARCH) have created and mounted a functional folly, appropriately named La Cage aux Folles (The Cage of Follies). Constructed of painted, steel tubes and installed at Materials & Applications, an centre in Los Angeles, La Cage aux Folles played host to an array of musical performances and lectures.

Explore La Cage aux Folles with more photos and info after the break.

Ban House / Zhang Dongguang + Liu Wenjuan

© Liu Wenjuan

Architects: , Liu Wenjuan
Location: , Shaanxi, China
Area: 80.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Liu Wenjuan

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2014 Venice Biennale

The Conflict Between the Global North and South at the 2014 Venice Biennale

A view from the floor of the Latvian pavilion. The sheets of paper carry images of Modernist buildings; the ceiling asks, “There is no in Latvia”, commenting on the lack of historical scholarship. Image Courtesy of NRJA

“Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014 is an invitation to the national pavilions to show, each in their own way, the process of the erasure of national characteristics in architecture in favor of the almost universal adoption of a single modern language and a single repertoire of typologies.” In this article, originally published on Metropolis Magazine as “Whose Modernity?“, Avinash Rajagopal investigates the  this mandated theme at the 2014 Venice Biennale unintentionally created between the Northern and Southern pavilions - with Northern pavilions tending to declare sole ownership over Modernism and many Southern pavilions denying that their countries were passive recipients of the North’s globalization. For more on how the Southern pavilions challenged the typical conveyance of architectural history, continue reading after the break.