the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Shigeru Ban Architects

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS FIRM HERE

10 ArchDaily Projects That You Can Book Through Airbnb

14:00 - 8 August, 2018
10 ArchDaily Projects That You Can Book Through Airbnb, La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Gregori Civera
La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Gregori Civera

ArchDaily and Airbnb were both founded in 2008, but for two very different reasons. Since then, ArchDaily has amassed a vast database of tens of thousands of buildings, located in cities and countries all around the world. Meanwhile, Airbnb has revolutionized the way in which we explore these countries, and use these buildings, even if just for one night.

While architecture lovers have occasionally been offered very limited experiences through Airbnb, such as a one-night stay on the Great Wall of China, or an architectural tour of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Stadium courtesy of Kengo Kuma, it transpires that Airbnb’s listings contain some notable architectural gems available for regular booking.

Kubuswoningen / Piet Blom. Image © Dirk Verwoerd Ex of In House / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Paul Warchol Sky Pods / Natura Vive. Image © Airbnb VillaLóla / ARKÍS architects. Image © ARKÍS architects + 52

10 Images of Architecture Reflected in Water

12:00 - 5 August, 2018
10 Images of Architecture Reflected in Water, © Yao Li
© Yao Li

This week we have prepared a selection of photographs in which reflections in water is used as the main compositional element. In these images, the surface qualities of the water play a fundamental role in giving the composition its final effect—either acting as a perfect mirror or giving a diffuse touch. Below is a selection of 10 images from prominent photographers such as Lu Hengzhong, Yao Li, and Nico Saieh.

© Nico Saieh © Yao Li © Lu Hengzhong © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG + 11

Spotlight: Shigeru Ban

08:00 - 5 August, 2018
Spotlight: Shigeru Ban, Aspen Art Museum. Image © Michael Moran
Aspen Art Museum. Image © Michael Moran

Shigeru Ban (born August 5th 1957) is a Japanese architect who won the 2014 Pritzker Prize for his significant contributions in architectural innovation and philanthropy. His ability to re-apply conventional knowledge in differing contexts has resulted in a breadth of work that is characterized by structural sophistication and unconventional techniques and materials. Ban has used these innovations not only to create beautiful architecture but as a tool to help those in need, by creating fast, economical, and sustainable housing solutions for the homeless and the displaced. As the Pritzker jury cites: “Shigeru Ban is a tireless architect whose work exudes optimism.”

Nine Bridges Country Club. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai Oita Prefectural Art Museum. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai La Seine Musicale. Image © Boegly + Grazia photographers Curtain Wall House. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai + 17

Shigeru Ban Creates Temporary Shelter System for Japanese Flooding Victims

16:00 - 16 July, 2018
Shigeru Ban Creates Temporary Shelter System for Japanese Flooding Victims, Courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network
Courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network

Pritzker Prize-winning architect Shigeru Ban has mobilized his Voluntary Architects’ Network (VAN) to aid victims of recent devastating floods in Southern Japan. At least 210 people have been killed by flooding and landslides which occurred last week, with a continuing heatwave further hampering recovery efforts.

Ban, along with members of the VAN and student volunteers, is constructing a partition system in evacuation centers made from paper tubes and cloth curtains. The temporary structures intend to offer privacy for flooding victims, forming a modular unit of 2 meters by 2 meters.

Courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network Courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network Courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network Courtesy of Voluntary Architects' Network + 7

New Renderings Reveal Interiors of Shigeru Ban-Designed World’s Tallest Hybrid Timber Building in Vancouver

14:00 - 8 December, 2017
New Renderings Reveal Interiors of Shigeru Ban-Designed World’s Tallest Hybrid Timber Building in Vancouver, Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects / PortLiving
Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects / PortLiving

A new set of renderings has been released the Shigeru Ban Architects’ Terrace House development in Vancouver, revealing the interiors of the residential building for the first time. Being developed by PortLiving, the project will utilize an innovative hybrid timer structural system. When completed, it will become the tallest hybrid timber structure in the world.

Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects / PortLiving Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects / PortLiving Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects / PortLiving Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects / PortLiving + 6

Shigeru Ban to Design Up to 20,000 New Homes for Refugees in Kenya

14:00 - 18 July, 2017
Shigeru Ban to Design Up to 20,000 New Homes for Refugees in Kenya, Shigeru Ban designed housing on the southeast coast of Sri Lanka, following the destruction caused by a 2004 tsunami. Image © Dominic Sansoni
Shigeru Ban designed housing on the southeast coast of Sri Lanka, following the destruction caused by a 2004 tsunami. Image © Dominic Sansoni

Pritzker Prize winning architect Shigeru Ban has signed an agreement with UN-Habitat, the United Nations agency tasked with guiding sustainable development, to design up to 20,000 new homes for refugees in Kenya’s Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement. Currently home to more than 37,000 refugees, the settlement is quickly outgrowing its original capacity of 45,000 – over 17,000 have arrived this year alone, with numbers expected to continue to increase.

“The key thing will be to design and construct shelter where no or little technical supervision is required, and use materials that are locally available and eco-friendly. It’s important that the houses can be easily maintained by inhabitants.”

La Seine Musicale / Shigeru Ban Architects

03:00 - 28 June, 2017
La Seine Musicale / Shigeru Ban Architects, © Boegly + Grazia photographers
© Boegly + Grazia photographers

Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects + 61

Shigeru Ban Architects Reveals Designs for World’s Tallest Hybrid Timber Building in Vancouver

12:00 - 2 June, 2017
Shigeru Ban Architects Reveals Designs for World’s Tallest Hybrid Timber Building in Vancouver, Terrace House (behind) with the Evergreen Building in the foreground. Image Courtesy of PortLiving
Terrace House (behind) with the Evergreen Building in the foreground. Image Courtesy of PortLiving

The design of the world’s tallest hybrid timber building, by Shigeru Ban Architects, has been revealed by Vancouver-based developer PortLiving. Named “Terrace House,” the project will be located in Vancouver’s Coal Harbour neighborhood, adjacent to the landmark-listed Evergreen Building, designed by late architect Arthur Erickson. The design of the “Terrace House” pays tribute to its neighbor, picking up the architectural language of triangular shapes, natural materials, and an abundance of greenery.

Terrace House (behind) with the Evergreen Building in the foreground. Image Courtesy of PortLiving Terrace House model. Image Courtesy of PortLiving Terrace House. Image Courtesy of PortLiving The adjacent Evergreen Building, designed by Arthur Erickson. Image © Flickr user jmv. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 + 5

Studio Gang, SANAA Among Winners of 2017 AIA Institute Honor Awards

13:05 - 17 January, 2017
Studio Gang, SANAA Among Winners of 2017 AIA Institute Honor Awards

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) have named 18 architectural and interior projects as recipients of the 2017 Institute Honor Awards, the profession’s highest recognition for excellence in design.

According to the AIA, “the 2017 Architecture program celebrates the best contemporary architecture regardless of budget, size, style, or type. These stunning projects show the world the range of outstanding work architects create and highlight the many ways buildings and spaces can improve our lives.”

The awarded projects were selected from nearly 700 submissions. The winners will be honored at the 2017 AIA National Convention in Orlando.

Studio Gang, Shigeru Ban Among 5 Shortlisted for Arkansas Arts Center Expansion

11:55 - 4 October, 2016
Studio Gang, Shigeru Ban Among 5 Shortlisted for Arkansas Arts Center Expansion, Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center
Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center

The Arkansas Arts Center has selected five top architecture firms to compete for the design of a $55 million to $65 million museum expansion project in Little Rock, Arkansas. The project will include a renovation to existing theater and studio spaces, as well as new education facilities for families and gallery space to house the museum’s expanding art collection.

An advisory panel and selection committee named the finalists following a RFQ process featuring 23 local and international firms.

The 5 firms selected as finalists are:

AD Classics: Nomadic Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

08:00 - 3 January, 2016
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Shigeru Ban, the 2014 Pritzker Prize winner, is an architect often celebrated for his humanitarian and disaster relief structures, constructed out of recycled or recyclable materials. On the other end of spectrum, he is well-known for his meticulously constructed residential and museum projects, more often than not for high-end wealthy clients. The Nomadic Museum, however, combines both of these facets of his practice, using shipping containers and paper tubes to craft a bespoke mobile gallery for Gregory Colbert’s traveling exhibition of photography entitled Ashes and Snow.

© flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Nomadic Museum, New York. Image © flickr user informedmindstravel, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Section, Santa Monica + 10

Oita Prefectural Art Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

03:00 - 7 August, 2015
Oita Prefectural Art Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects, © Hiroyuki Hirai
© Hiroyuki Hirai

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 11

Shigeru Ban's Nepalese Emergency Shelters to be Built from Rubble

16:10 - 29 July, 2015
© VAN, courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects
© VAN, courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban Architects has released images of their first emergency shelter prototype designed for Nepal. Planned to be built by the end of August, the simple shelter is designed to be easily assembled by almost anyone. Using connecting modular wooden frames (3ft x 7ft or 90cm x 210cm), salvaged rubble bricks are used to infill the wall's cavities while paper tube trussing supports the roof. This, as Shigeru Ban says, will allow for "quick erection and nearly immediate inhabitation."

JR Onagawa Station / Shigeru Ban Architects

23:00 - 13 May, 2015
JR Onagawa Station / Shigeru Ban Architects, © Hiroyuki Hirai
© Hiroyuki Hirai

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 32

  • Architects

  • Location

    Onagawa Station, Onagawahama, Onagawa, Oshika District, Miyagi Prefecture 986-2261, Japan
  • Area

    600.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Help Shigeru Ban Provide Emergency Shelter to Nepal

13:05 - 7 May, 2015
Help Shigeru Ban Provide Emergency Shelter to Nepal, Shigeru Ban's permanent paper housing in India. Image © Kartikeya Shodhan
Shigeru Ban's permanent paper housing in India. Image © Kartikeya Shodhan

Shigeru Ban Architects, together with the Voluntary Architects' Network (VAN), has announced plans to send emergency shelter, housing and other community facilitates to the victims of Nepal's deadly April 25th earthquake. As part of a three-phase plan, Shigeru Ban will first delivery and assemble tents with plastic partitions acquired though donation to provide immediate shelter. A few months after, the Japanese practice will collaborate with local architects and students to build temporary housing with materials found prevalent in Nepal.

Permanent housing will also be provided in the architect-led recovery plan's third phase, although little details have been released. However, you can help make it happen by donating to Shigeru Ban's efforts (here).

Watch Shigeru Ban's TED Talk on paper emergency structures, after the break. 

Shigeru Ban on Growing Up, Carpentry, and Cardboard Tubes

19:00 - 30 April, 2015
Shigeru Ban on Growing Up, Carpentry, and Cardboard Tubes, Shigeru Ban’s Cardboard Cathedral in New Zealand. Image © Bridgit Anderson
Shigeru Ban’s Cardboard Cathedral in New Zealand. Image © Bridgit Anderson

He may have risen to prominence for his disaster relief architecture and deft use of recyclable materials, but Shigeru Ban describes his idiosyncratic use of material as an "accident." Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, the 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate recalls turning to cardboard tubes as a matter of necessity. "I had to create a design for an exhibition," Ban told the newspaper, "But I couldn't afford wood. Instead, I used the many paper tubes from rolls of drafting paper that were lying around. The tubes turned out to be quite strong." The most prominent of Ban's cardboard tube structures is Christchurch's Cardboard Cathedral, built in the aftermath of an earthquake that devastated the city in early 2011. Read WSJ's full interview with Ban here.

The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

01:00 - 12 February, 2015
The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

With our annual Building of the Year Awards, over 30,000 readers narrowed down over 3,000 projects, selecting just 14 as the best examples of architecture that ArchDaily has published in the past year. The results have been celebrated and widely shared, of course, usually in the form of images of each project. But what is often forgotten in this flurry of image sharing is that every one of these 14 projects has a backstory of significance which adds to our understanding of their architectural quality.

Some of these projects are intelligent responses to pressing social issues, others are twists on a well-established typology. Others still are simply supreme examples of architectural dexterity. In order that we don't forget the tremendous amount of effort that goes into creating each of these architectural masterpieces, continue reading after the break for the 14 stories that defined this year's Building of the Year Awards.

Winners of the 2015 Building of the Year Awards

01:00 - 6 February, 2015
Winners of the 2015 Building of the Year Awards

After two weeks of nominations and voting, we are pleased to present the winners of the 2015 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards. As a peer-based, crowdsourced architecture award, the results shown here represent the collective intelligence of 31,000 architects, filtering the best architecture from over 3,000 projects featured on ArchDaily during the past year.

The winning buildings represent a diverse group of architects, from Pritzker Prize winners such as Álvaro Siza, Herzog & de Meuron and Shigeru Ban, to up-and-coming practices such as EFFEKT and Building which have so far been less widely covered by the media. In many cases their designs may be the most visually striking, but each also approaches its context and program in a unique way to solve social, environmental or economic challenges in communities around the world. By publishing them on ArchDaily, these buildings have helped us to impart inspiration and knowledge to architects around the world, furthering our mission. So to everyone who participated by either nominating or voting for a shortlisted project, thank you for being a part of this amazing process, where the voices of architects from all over the world unite to form one strong, intelligent, forward-thinking message.