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Architecture from The Netherlands

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Latest projects in The Netherlands

Latest news in The Netherlands

Studio Komma Will Transform Former Dutch Cargo Ships Into Sustainable Homes

06:30 - 20 July, 2018
Studio Komma Will Transform Former Dutch Cargo Ships Into Sustainable Homes, Courtesy of Studio Komma
Courtesy of Studio Komma

Adaptive reuse, the process of refashioning a defunct structure for a new purpose, is ubiquitous these days—so much so that hearing a phrase like “converted warehouse” or “repurposed factory” barely causes one to blink an eye. However, a new project from a cohort of Dutch architecture firms highlights the innovative nature of adaptive reuse with a scheme that reimagines disused cargo ships as houses. With their fully intact exterior shells, the ships remind residents and visitors of their industrial, seafaring past. 

What Makes a City Livable to You?

09:30 - 28 April, 2018
What Makes a City Livable to You?, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/design_aditi/15988588224/'>Flickr user design_aditi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageA street festival in Singapore
© Flickr user design_aditi licensed under CC BY 2.0. ImageA street festival in Singapore

Mercer released their annual list of the Most Livable Cities in the World last month. The list ranks 231 cities based on factors such as crime rates, sanitation, education and health standards, with Vienna at #1 and Baghdad at #231. There’s always some furor over the results, as there ought to be when a city we love does not make the top 20, or when we see a city rank highly but remember that one time we visited and couldn’t wait to leave.

These Are The 20 Most Livable Cities in the World in 2018

06:00 - 5 April, 2018
These Are The 20 Most Livable Cities in the World in 2018, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/theodevil/4970314282'>Miroslav Petrasko [Flickr]</a>, bajo licencia <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>. ImageViena, Austria
© Miroslav Petrasko [Flickr], bajo licencia CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. ImageViena, Austria

For the ninth consecutive year, Vienna has placed first in Mercer rankings on cities with the best quality of life in the world. Despite the current economic volatility in the European continent, the Austrian capital joins eight other European cities in the top ten. 

Dutch Pavilion at 2018 Venice Biennale, WORK, BODY, LEISURE, to Address Automation and Its Spatial Implications

18:00 - 29 March, 2018
Dutch Pavilion at 2018 Venice Biennale, WORK, BODY, LEISURE, to Address Automation and Its Spatial Implications, Anthropometric Data - Crane Cabin Operator vs Remote Control Operator. Drawing by Het Nieuwe Instituut 2017. Image Courtesy of Het Nieuwe Instituut
Anthropometric Data - Crane Cabin Operator vs Remote Control Operator. Drawing by Het Nieuwe Instituut 2017. Image Courtesy of Het Nieuwe Instituut

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the Dutch Pavilion. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words. 

99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer

14:00 - 10 March, 2018
99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer, © <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Janericloebe'>Wikimedia user Janericloebe</a>licensed under<a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
© Wikimedia user Janericloebelicensed underCC BY-SA 3.0

How can we plan a better city? The answer has confounded architects and urban planners since the birth of the industrial city. One attempt at answering came in the form of a spectacular modernist proposal outside of Amsterdam called the Bijlmermeer. And, as a new two-part episode by 99% Invisible reveals, it failed miserably. But, like all histories, the story is not as simple as it first appears. 

NEXT Architects' Zalige Bridge Transforms Into Stepping Stones During Flood Conditions

12:30 - 23 January, 2018
NEXT Architects' Zalige Bridge Transforms Into Stepping Stones During Flood Conditions, © NEXT Architects. Photography: Rutger Hollander
© NEXT Architects. Photography: Rutger Hollander

In a country famous for its below sea level towns, combating flooding has been a key challenge for Dutch designers for centuries, resulting in the construction of numerous dikes, levees and seawalls across the country. But when tasked with creating a new pedestrian link across an urban river park in Nijmegen, NEXT Architects and H+N+S Landscape Architects decided to try a different approach: to celebrate the natural event by designing a stepping stone bridge that only becomes useful in high water conditions.

Hi-Tech Hub The 'Dutch Mountains' Planned to Become the World's Largest Wooden Building

12:00 - 3 January, 2018
Hi-Tech Hub The 'Dutch Mountains' Planned to Become the World's Largest Wooden Building, © Studio Marco Vermeulen
© Studio Marco Vermeulen

Plans have been revealed for the “largest wooden building in the world” to be located just outside Eindhoven in the town of Veldhoven, The Netherlands. Known as the Dutch Mountains, the complex was conceived via a multi-disciplinary partnership made up of tech companies, service providers, architects and developers, and would contain a hi-tech, mixed-use program for residents and visitors.

OMA / AMO Completes Flexible Permanent Exhibition Space for Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam

14:30 - 14 December, 2017
OMA / AMO Completes Flexible Permanent Exhibition Space for Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Photograph by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti. Image Courtesy of OMA
Photograph by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti. Image Courtesy of OMA

AMO, the research and think tank wing of OMA, has completed a flexible new exhibition space for the permanent collection of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Named Stedelijk BASE, the bespoke display system is constructed from “very thin yet solid” free-standing steel partitions that interlock like puzzle-pieces to create an open-ended flow for viewing art from the late 19th and 20th centuries. 

OMA’s Rijnstraat 8 Redesign Brings Transparency and Light to a Government Building in The Hague

09:30 - 9 November, 2017
OMA’s Rijnstraat 8 Redesign Brings Transparency and Light to a Government Building in The Hague, Photograph by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, © OMA
Photograph by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, © OMA

In addition to their videos, #donotsettle’s Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost tell extended stories about the buildings they visit through an exclusive column on ArchDaily: #donotsettle Extra. In this installment, the duo brings you to the newest design by OMARijnstraat 8 in The Hague, The Netherlands. Saskia Simon and Kees van Casteren from OMA explained the architecture of Rijnstraat 8 to #donotsettle while touring the building.

MVRDV Designs Multicolored Tetris Hotel for Dutch Design Week 2017

06:00 - 26 October, 2017
MVRDV Designs Multicolored Tetris Hotel for Dutch Design Week 2017, © Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

Hoping to answer the question "what does the future city look like?" at Dutch Design WeekMVRDV (definitive design and construction drawings) and think tank The Why Factory (Research and concept design) have fabricated a multicolored, tetris-like hotel in Eindhoven. The future brings decreasing resources, increasing population, and climate change, reasons MVRDV, and with these limitations in mind, they believe futuristic architecture needs one important quality: flexibility.

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