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Coastal Design: The Latest Architecture and News

Snøhetta Unveils Designs for Europe's First Underwater Restaurant

06:45 - 23 October, 2017
Snøhetta Unveils Designs for Europe's First Underwater Restaurant, © MIR and Snøhetta
© MIR and Snøhetta

Snøhetta have revealed designs for Europe's first underwater restaurant in the coastal village of Båly, in Norway. The structure, which also houses a marine life research center, teeters over the edge of a rocky outcrop, semi-submerged in the ocean. Built from concrete, the monolithic structure will come to rest on the sea bed five meters below the water's surface; here, it will "fuse" with the ecosystem of the concealed shoreline. Below the waterline, the restaurant’s enormous acrylic windows will frame a view of the seabed.

When Architecture and Tourism Meet: La Grande Motte's Pyramids by the Seaside

09:30 - 21 July, 2017
When Architecture and Tourism Meet: La Grande Motte's Pyramids by the Seaside, © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ville-architecturale-de-la-Grande-Motte.JPG'>Wikimedia user Jjoulie</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
© Wikimedia user Jjoulie licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Given a chance to realize the architect’s dream of creating his own utopian city from a blank slate, French architect Jean Balladur was inspired by lost civilizations of the past. His designs recall the architecture of grand Mayan ruins with some added flair from the 1960s, all in the form of a seaside resort village in southern France, La Grande Motte. Balladur devoted nearly 30 years to his life’s work, which today welcomes over 2 million tourists annually.

"La Grande Pyramide". Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Grande_motte_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Alain Caraco</a> licensed under <a href='http://https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> "Le Temple du Soleil". Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Temple_du_soleil_Grande-Motte_059.jpg'>Wikimedia user Dinkley</a> licensed under <a href='http://https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/alexbaranov/5231503058/'>Flickr user alexbaranov</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Public domain image <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/modern-architecture-france-beach-620035/'>via Pixabay user Jackmac34</a> + 16

Casa Brutale is Getting Built, and Here’s Why (Hint: The Internet)

09:30 - 2 May, 2016
Casa Brutale is Getting Built, and Here’s Why (Hint: The Internet), Courtesy of OPA
Courtesy of OPA

When ArchDaily published “Live on the Edge with OPA’s Casa Brutale” in July of last year, we expected it to be popular on our site, but few anticipated exactly how much attention the project would receive—enough to secure a position in the top 10 most read articles on the site in 2015. But what happened next was perhaps more astounding. By the end of the week, the project had been picked up by the gamut of non-architecture news outlets ranging from Slate to Yahoo to CNET to CNBC. For a few short days, it became difficult to traverse the wild expanses of the internet without a sighting of the project’s lead image, typically accompanied by a hyperbolic headline along the lines of “This Beautiful, Terrifying House is Literally Inside a Cliff.”

But despite the enormous traction, with seemingly impossible features like a clifftop, glass-bottomed swimming pool, the project still seemed to be destined for "paper architecture" status. Yet fast forward to today and the house has (incredibly) found a willing client, and is about to break ground on construction. How did this happen, and what takes architecture from viral sensation to real-life construction project?

Courtesy of OPA Courtesy of OPA Courtesy of OPA Courtesy of OPA + 23

Live on the Edge with OPA's Casa Brutale

14:00 - 3 July, 2015
Live on the Edge with OPA's Casa Brutale, © OPA Works
© OPA Works

In our article for this cliff-hanging project by Modscape published last year, we said that all it really needed was James Bond and an invisible Aston Martin in the garage. Well, the images presented by OPA (Open Platform for Architecture) for their new project offer us James Bond and a (sadly visible) Ferrari. Perhaps it's not quite what we expected, but either way it's a big step forward for the super-villains lair market: Casa Brutale gives us wall-to-wall water and concrete set into cliffs above the Aegean Sea in what OPA promises will be a literally ground-breaking development.

© OPA Works © OPA Works © OPA Works © OPA Works + 22

Jump Off A Cliff and Land in Bed in this Edgy Australian Home

01:00 - 12 September, 2014
Jump Off A Cliff and Land in Bed in this Edgy Australian Home, Exterior View. Image Courtesy of Modscape
Exterior View. Image Courtesy of Modscape

Picture yourself waking up daily to a 180-degree view of the ocean without leaving the comfort of your living room. The owners of the as-yet-unbuilt Cliff House have teamed up with Modscape of Australia to design their compact dream home, delicately perched above open water, hanging off the cliff's edge. Cliff House redefines "living dangerously" with its vast floor to ceiling windows and slender steel supports acting as the only separation between watching Jaws and actually being in Jaws.

Dive into Cliff House with images, plans and more info after the break.

Juice Architects Propose Offshore Visitor Centre for Swansea Bay

01:00 - 15 February, 2014
Juice Architects Propose Offshore Visitor Centre for Swansea Bay, Courtesy of Juice Architects
Courtesy of Juice Architects

London based practice Juice Architects has unveiled designs for an offshore visitor centre as part of the proposed tidal lagoon for Swansea Bay, Wales. A series of overlapping shells are sculpted to form a bowl like structure, providing shelter from the wind and waves of the Welsh coast. Sat on a manmade island platform at the end of a collection of land piers, the building will act as a cultural and educational base housing public galleries, a café, a lecture theatre and exhibition space with working turbine propellors visible through the the ground floor gallery. As an entirely self sufficient building all energy will be captured from renewable sources.