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Metropolis: The Latest Architecture and News

WeWork is Transforming the Way Architects Use Data in Design

06:00 - 10 March, 2019
Courtesy of WeWork via Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy of WeWork via Metropolis Magazine

Data-driven design has been a holy phrase in architecture for some time now. The ability to refine and apply information on any range of topics, from movement to sun paths to air quality, hold enormous potential to positively impact design not just for one party but for all. Decisions can be made faster, buildings can be built better, inhabitants can be made more comfortable.

The Unfamiliar History of an Expressionist, Crafty Bauhaus

08:00 - 16 February, 2019
The Unfamiliar History of an Expressionist, Crafty Bauhaus, The African Chair, designed in 1921 by Gunta Stölzl and Marcel Breuer. Image Courtesy of Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, photo: Hartwig Klappert/© 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
The African Chair, designed in 1921 by Gunta Stölzl and Marcel Breuer. Image Courtesy of Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, photo: Hartwig Klappert/© 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Every famed design movement has an interesting story of how it managed to influence architecture and design through the years. Despite their impact, not all movements began with the same principles they managed to ultimately lead with, and Bauhaus is no exception. The clean-cut modernist archetype, which has pioneered modern architecture for a century now, was once an experimental design institution of expressionism, unbound creativity, and handcraft, bridging the styles of Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts with Modernist designs.

The Insignificance of Aesthetics: An Exhibition at Vitra Design Museum Adds a Context of Urgency to the Works of Victor Papanek

07:00 - 5 February, 2019
Victor Papanek. Image Courtesy of donation from Nicolette Papanek/Victor J. Papanek Foundation
Victor Papanek. Image Courtesy of donation from Nicolette Papanek/Victor J. Papanek Foundation

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Design Provocateur: Revisiting the Prescient Ideas of Victor Papanek".

“Today industrial design has put murder on a mass-production basis,” declared Victor Papanek, design provocateur and critic, from the podium of a design-activist happening in 1968. “By designing criminally unsafe automobiles that kill or maim,” he roared, “by creating a whole new species of permanent garbage to clutter up the landscape, and by choosing materials and processes that pollute the air we breathe, designers have become a dangerous breed.”

Art Will Save Architecture, According to Steven Holl

09:00 - 29 December, 2018
Courtesy of Yudi Ela
Courtesy of Yudi Ela

Award-winning architect Steven Holl has expressed his dismay of modern-day architecture to Metropolis Magazine. Although Steven Holl Architects (SHA) have recently won the design competition of a gateway building at University College Dublin, and have completed new buildings in London, Houston, Virginia, and Richmond this past year only, the architect is convinced that regardless of all the success, “it’s not a great moment, there are a lot of bad architects”.

OMA's Latest Fails to Live Up To Its Own Pedagogy

09:30 - 21 December, 2018
OMA's Latest Fails to Live Up To Its Own Pedagogy, The first tower of OMA's Norra Tornen project. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu via Metropolis Magazine
The first tower of OMA's Norra Tornen project. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu via Metropolis Magazine

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "In His Latest Residential Building, OMA's Reinier de Graaf Doesn't Practice What He Preaches".

Last month in Stockholm, OMA partner Reinier de Graaf took a not-so-sly swipe at Bjarke Ingels: “I’m not a reincarnation of Harry Potter,” he said to a packed lecture theater at Stockholm’s KTH University.

The Famed and Forgotten Works of Uruguay's Modernists

16:00 - 23 September, 2018
Vilamajó (Uruguay, second from left) with various members of the Board of Design Consultants for the UN Headquarters Building in 1947, including N. D. Bassov (Soviet Union), Gaston Brunfaut (Belgium), Ernest Cormier (Canada), Le Corbusier (France), Liang Seu-cheng (China), Sven Markelius (Sweden), Oscar Niemeyer (Brazil), Howard Robertson (United Kingdom), and G. A. Soilleux (Australia), as part of the Board of Design Consultants for the U.N. Headquarters Building in 1947. Image Courtesy of Courtesy the Facultad de Arquitectura Diseño y Ubranismo Montevideo, via Metropolis Magazine
Vilamajó (Uruguay, second from left) with various members of the Board of Design Consultants for the UN Headquarters Building in 1947, including N. D. Bassov (Soviet Union), Gaston Brunfaut (Belgium), Ernest Cormier (Canada), Le Corbusier (France), Liang Seu-cheng (China), Sven Markelius (Sweden), Oscar Niemeyer (Brazil), Howard Robertson (United Kingdom), and G. A. Soilleux (Australia), as part of the Board of Design Consultants for the U.N. Headquarters Building in 1947. Image Courtesy of Courtesy the Facultad de Arquitectura Diseño y Ubranismo Montevideo, via Metropolis Magazine

Uruguay's architecture scene has long taken the backseat to those of its more popular neighbours. Brazil, to the north, has a modernist history that rivals (if not shades) that of its European peers; Chile, to the west, boasts an innovative climate for architecture unparalleled in the world today.

The Top 10 Design Cities of 2018, As Revealed by Metropolis Magazine

06:00 - 18 August, 2018
The Top 10 Design Cities of 2018, As Revealed by Metropolis Magazine, Bund Finance Centre / Foster + Partners and Heatherwick Studio. Image © Laurian Ghintiou
Bund Finance Centre / Foster + Partners and Heatherwick Studio. Image © Laurian Ghintiou

For this year's annual city listings, Metropolis Magazine took an unusual approach: they took the analysis to the streets, surveying nearly 100 design professionals across the globe to get their opinions. The result? A list that boasts not just the cities you'd expect (Milan, London, Berlin) but the under the radar powerhouses you might not have anticipated.

Reinventing a Superblock in Central Seoul - Without the Gentrification

09:30 - 13 August, 2018
Reinventing a Superblock in Central Seoul - Without the Gentrification, Courtesy Kyoung Roh, via Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy Kyoung Roh, via Metropolis Magazine

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "A Once-Maligned Concrete Megastructure in Seoul is Revitalized - Sans Gentrification".

Upon its completion in 1966, Sewoon Sangga, designed by prominent South Korean architect Kim Swoo-geun, was a groundbreaking residential and commercial megastructure consisting of eight multistory buildings covering a full kilometer in the heart of Seoul. Like other futuristic projects of the decade, it was conceived as a self-contained city, complete with amenities that included a park, an atrium, and a pedestrian deck. But construction realities crippled Kim’s utopian vision, compromising those features. By the late 1970s, Sewoon Sangga had shed residents and anchor retail outlets to newer, shinier developments in the wealthy Gangnam district across the river. Between Sewoon’s central location and plunging rents, the building became a hub for light industry—as well as illicit activity.

Today's Rising Stars in Design: Metropolis Magazine Reveals their Picks

16:00 - 4 August, 2018
Today's Rising Stars in Design: Metropolis Magazine Reveals their Picks, © Laurian Ghinitoiu, via Metropolis Magazine. ImageThe Institute of Sports Sciences at the University of Lausanne / Karamuk Kuo
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, via Metropolis Magazine. ImageThe Institute of Sports Sciences at the University of Lausanne / Karamuk Kuo

Architecture has always been multidisciplinary, demanding new expertise for each project and challenging designers to remain nimble. This seems more true now (and more embraced) than ever, with architects turning their eye towards technology, agriculture, data science - even to Mars.

The Engineering Behind San Francisco's Safest Building

09:30 - 28 July, 2018
The Engineering Behind San Francisco's Safest Building, For 181 Fremont, Arup’s radical move was to do away with plans for a tuned mass damper or a sloshing damper on the skyscraper’s roof—common features in tall towers in the U.S. for reducing the natural sway of buildings. Neither damper style goes very far in protecting a building against seismic force, says Ibbi Almufti of Arup. Image Courtesy of Kevin Chu/KCJP
For 181 Fremont, Arup’s radical move was to do away with plans for a tuned mass damper or a sloshing damper on the skyscraper’s roof—common features in tall towers in the U.S. for reducing the natural sway of buildings. Neither damper style goes very far in protecting a building against seismic force, says Ibbi Almufti of Arup. Image Courtesy of Kevin Chu/KCJP

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Skyscraper's Innovative Structure is Changing the Game for Earthquake Design".

The most remarkable thing about 181 Fremont—San Francisco’s third-tallest tower, designed by Heller Manus Architects—is not the penthouse’s asking price ($42 million). Rather, it’s an innovative yet unglamorous structural detail: a viscous damper system that far exceeds California Code earthquake-performance objectives for buildings of 181 Fremont’s class, allowing immediate reoccupation after a seismic event.

What's the Difference Between a Megacity, a Metropolis, a Megalopolis and a Global City?

07:00 - 20 June, 2018
What's the Difference Between a Megacity, a Metropolis, a Megalopolis and a Global City?, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/balintfoeldesi/11753289395'>Flickr user balintfoeldesi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user balintfoeldesi licensed under CC BY 2.0

You can’t define modern civilization without mentioning its cities. These urban settlements vary in culture, size and specialty, with certain areas becoming more significant throughout the development of a region. Historically, the size or population of a settlement was a general indicator of its importance—the bigger city, the more power it yields—however, with the large rural-to-urban migration of the last century, it has become harder to define what makes a city important. There are many types of urban landscapes, and for architects and planners it is vital to efficiently categorize settlement types in order to successfully develop designs and city plans. The following list provides four key definitions that have emerged in the last century.

© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/126887487@N04/15006436297'>Flickr user 126887487@N04</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © NASA © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lujiazui,_Pudong,_Shanghai,_China_-_panoramio_(11).jpg'>Haluk Comertel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seoul_City_from_Seoul_Tower_서울_-_panoramio.jpg'>Foxy Who \(^∀^)/</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 8

Could Electric Cars Turn Gas Stations Into the Community Hubs of the Future?

09:30 - 15 April, 2017
Could Electric Cars Turn Gas Stations Into the Community Hubs of the Future?, Courtesy of Ennead Architects/Ennead Lab
Courtesy of Ennead Architects/Ennead Lab

One general trend in today's Information Age involves the absolute transmutation of downtime into productivity or engagement of any kind, however meaningless. We hear it all the time: we have lost our ability to be still. However, as a team at Ennead Lab has observed, some of the same technologies that are causing this shift in routine also have the potential to open new, empty pockets of time in our daily lives, and affect the built spaces with which we interact.

Tasked with designing an electric car charging station for a development in Shanghai, Ennead realized that the five hours required to fill up a single standard charge necessitate a place for customers to wait. In an article on Metropolis Magazine, they show that the promise of transportation-less people to stick around in one place for such a period of time opens up a host of possibilities for what could fill the latency period; the Shanghai project, however, focuses on the opportunity to create a civic space. The team has imagined the modern "gas station" as a vertical charging tower that calls upon the functionality of urban parking elevators in the 20th century, this time clad in reflective silver to serve as a beacon for customers in search of a charge. Rather than standalone charge-park towers, the projects are integrated into a system that encourages patrons to walk to neighboring zones to eat, shop, and socialize while they wait.

11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

07:15 - 5 April, 2017
11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

It can sometimes feel as if the world is divided into two camps: those who do not listen to podcasts (probably because they don’t know what a podcast is) and those who listen to podcasts, love podcasts, and keep badgering their friends for recommendations so they can start listening to even more.

Unlike other media, it’s notoriously difficult to discover and share podcasts – even more so if you’re looking for a podcast on a niche subject like architecture, design or urbanism. To help you in your hour of need, Metropolis’ Vanessa Quirk (author of Guide to Podcasting) and ArchDaily’s James Taylor-Foster (whose silvery tones you may have heard on various architecture and design audio stories) have come together to compile this list of eleven podcasts you should subscribe to.

Is "Post-Digital Drawing" the Next Stage in the Hand vs Computer Debate?

16:00 - 1 April, 2017
Is "Post-Digital Drawing" the Next Stage in the Hand vs Computer Debate?, <a href=‘http://www.archdaily.com/801629/garage-house-fala-atelier/58538399e58ece1f960000f8-garage-house-fala-atelier-collage'>Garage House / Fala Atelier</a>. Image Courtesy of Fala Atelier
Garage House / Fala Atelier. Image Courtesy of Fala Atelier

Currently on display at the MoMA in New York is Zaha Hadid's concept painting for her seminal unbuilt project, The Peak in Hong Kong. The piece was made in 1991, on the edge of the digital revolution in architectural drawing fueled at its heart by the popularization of 3D CAD programs. The painting for The Peak arguably came at the end of the period of architectural drawing for its own sake, and the beginning of a period of scalable, scrollable renderings meant to show the real world. It only makes sense that this new software for image creation would usher in a new style of drawing with a function very different to the previous era: tool and process inherently constrain design by imposing a predetermined agenda for the user's interaction with them.

During this digital period, architects like Lebbeus Woods and Michael Graves, known for their mastery in the art of hand drawing, pushed back against the dominant narrative of hyperrealism in architectural drawing. However, according to Sam Jacob's latest article for Metropolis Magazine, we may be entering an age of "post-digital" representation. In the post-digital, architects return to the convention of drawing, but create new methodologies by reevaluating and appropriating the digital tools of the last few decades. Current techniques within this practice have leaned heavily towards the collage, but research into what post-digital drawing could mean continues in firms and universities.

"Never Built New York" Explores the Forgotten Past and the Future that Never Was

10:30 - 29 November, 2016
Raymond Hood Skyscraper Bridge. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books
Raymond Hood Skyscraper Bridge. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "An Incredible Journey into the New York City that Never Was."

Imagine the waters surrounding the Statue of Liberty were filled up with land. That you could walk right up to Lady Liberty herself, following a path from Manhattan’s Battery Park. Believe it or not, in 1911, this could have been.

In Never Built New York, authors Greg Goldin and Sam Lubell (foreword by Daniel Libeskind) describe with irony, and sometimes nostalgia, the most significant architectural and planning projects of the last century, projects that would have drastically changed the city—but never did.

The 7 Best Sustainable Design Courses in the United States

09:30 - 20 November, 2016
The 7 Best Sustainable Design Courses in the United States, Students at <a href='http://architecture.woodbury.edu/'>Woodbury University School of Architecture</a>. One of Woodbury's graduate professional practice courses, focused on the Los Angeles region and the state of California, was named one of seven exemplary courses in sustainability-centered design. Image Courtesy of Woodbury University
Students at Woodbury University School of Architecture. One of Woodbury's graduate professional practice courses, focused on the Los Angeles region and the state of California, was named one of seven exemplary courses in sustainability-centered design. Image Courtesy of Woodbury University

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine.

For many years now, climate change has been a major concern for architects and engineers— and with good reason. After all, the built environment contributes to over 39% of all CO2 emissions and over 70% of all electricity usage in the United States. Several architecture and design-based initiatives aim to guide architecture away from environmentally harmful practice and towards a more sustainable approach. Architecture 2030, one such initiative, believes that to incite design change we must begin at its source: architectural education.

8 Projects that Exemplify Moscow's Urban Movement

09:30 - 27 July, 2016
8 Projects that Exemplify Moscow's Urban Movement, Zaryadye Park / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of Zaryadye Park
Zaryadye Park / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of Zaryadye Park

When it comes to urbanism these days, people’s attention is increasingly turning to Moscow. The city clearly intends to become one of the world’s leading megacities in the near future and is employing all necessary means to achieve its goal, with the city government showing itself to be very willing to invest in important urban developments (though not without some criticism).

A key player in this plan has been the Moscow Urban Forum. Although the forum’s stated goal is to find adequate designs for future megacities, a major positive side-effect is that it enables the city to organize the best competitions, select the best designers, and build the best urban spaces to promote the city of Moscow. The Forum also publishes research and academic documents to inform Moscow’s future endeavors; for example, Archaeology of the Periphery, a publication inspired by the 2013 forum and released in 2014, notably influenced the urban development on the outskirts of Moscow, but also highlighted the importance of combining urban development with the existing landscape.

Garage Museum of Contemporary Art / OMA. Image © Yuri Palmin Moscow Riverfront / Project Meganom. Image Courtesy of Project Meganom Novoperedelkino Subway Station / U-R-A. Image Courtesy of U-R-A | United Riga Architects Luzhniki Stadium. Image © Flickr user bbmexplorer licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0 + 43

Metropolis Selects "7 Design Innovators to Watch"

16:00 - 29 November, 2015
Metropolis Selects "7 Design Innovators to Watch", RAAF's "The End of Sitting". Image © Jan Kempenaers
RAAF's "The End of Sitting". Image © Jan Kempenaers

Candles shaped like icebergs that melt to increase awareness for global warming. Reconstructions of Brutalist playgrounds. Geometric overalls with patterns representing the taste buds. These are just a few of the projects tackled by the young minds selected by Metropolis Magazine as their “7 Designers to Watch.” The list includes architects RAAF, LAB.PRO.FAB and Assemble Studio, alongside furniture designers, industrial designers and a design strategist.