1. ArchDaily
  2. Modern Architecture

Modern Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

5 Films that Critique Modern Architecture

Of all arts, there is one that is truly capable of embracing architecture, and that is the cinema. The ability to represent spaces, moving in the course of time, brings cinema closer to architecture in a way that goes beyond the limitations of painting, sculpture, music - for a long time considered to be the art closest to ours - and even of dance. Both in cinema and in architecture space is a key subject, and although they deal with it in different ways, they converge by providing a bodily - and not only visual - experience of the built environment.

5 Films that Critique Modern Architecture - Image 1 of 45 Films that Critique Modern Architecture - Image 2 of 45 Films that Critique Modern Architecture - Image 3 of 45 Films that Critique Modern Architecture - Image 4 of 45 Films that Critique Modern Architecture - More Images+ 1

Guide for the Ultimate Mid-Century Modern Architecture Road Trip

The following excerpt from Sam Lubell's Mid-Century Modern Architecture Travel Guide: East Coast USA—with excellent photos by Darren Bradley—provides an introduction to the revelatory and inspiring charm of the East Coast's Mid-Century Modern masterpieces. The book includes over 250 unique projects and serves as record of one of the USA’s most important architectural movements.

Few experiences are as wedged into our psyches as the Great American Road Trip—a rite of passage chronicled by luminaries from Alexis de Tocqueville to Jack Kerouac. The Great American Mid-Century Modern Architecture Road Trip? Not famous. But that’s one of the many reasons it’s so appealing. Discovery, in this global, digital age, when few corners are mysterious, has become a rare commodity. And discovery on the East Coast of America—in the context of one of the finest collections of Modern design in the world—is that much sweeter.

Getty Assembles Experts for Conservation of Le Corbusier's Only Three Museums

The Getty Conservation Institute has announced a workshop to address the care and conservation of three museums designed by Le Corbusier. The three museums are the only museums designed by the prolific architect. The workshop will be held in India, where two of the three museums are, with municipal corporations from Ahmedabad and Chandigarh serving as hosts for the event. The Foundation Le Corbusier, located in Paris, will also be assisting with the workshop.

MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra

MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra - Image 12 of 4
© Fernando Guerra

From Portuguese architectural photographer Fernando Guerra comes imagery of MAD's Huangshan Mountain Village in China. This residential design, comprising ten housing blocks that mimic the mountain range they are embedded in, is just one piece of the Taiping Lake tourism master plan; architecture and nature blend together to create modern apartments with differing panoramic views.

MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra - Image 11 of 4MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra - Image 12 of 4MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra - Image 29 of 4MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra - Image 32 of 4MAD’s Huangshan Mountain Village Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra - More Images+ 45

Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro

As a trailblazer of Brazilian Modernism, Oscar Niemeyer is celebrated for his bold, sinuous forms, and his use of the “the liberated, sensual curve.” Paul Goldberger described it best when he wrote that “Niemeyer didn’t compromise modernism’s utopian ideals, but when filtered through his sensibility, the stern, unforgiving rigor of so much European modernism became as smooth as Brazilian jazz.”

When Georgio Mondadori, chairman of the Italian publishing house Mondadori, commissioned Niemeyer to design the company’s new headquarters in 1968, he wanted the building to look like the Itamaraty Palace (also known as Palace of the Arches) in Brasília. Niemeyer agreed, but given his playful spirit, he deliberately deviated from the earlier design and proceeded to build what he would later identify as his favorite of the projects he completed in Europe. Read on to see a striking set of sixteen photographs of the Mondadori building by Milan-based photographer and visual artist Karina Castro, who was commissioned by Mondadori to capture their headquarters over 40 years after the building's completion.

Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro - Image 1 of 4Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro - Image 2 of 4Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro - Image 3 of 4Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro - Image 4 of 4Oscar Niemeyer's Favorite Project in Europe Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro - More Images+ 10

Le Corbusier's Pavillon de l'Esprit Nouveau Named One of "20 Designs That Defined the Modern World"

Creator of London’s Design Museum and columnist for CNN, Stephen Bayley named Le Corbusier’s Pavillon de l’Esprit Nouveau as one of, “20 designs that defined the modern world.” Before Bayley lays out the list, he gives a brief history and several definitions of design; culminating to his conclusion that design gives life meaning. Bayley writes, “Le Corbusier declared that design is ‘intelligence made visible’. That’s certainly true, but intelligence can take many forms…” [1]

KAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

Netherlands-based architectural firm KAAN Architecten, in partnership with ABT, Estudio Lamela and Ineco has been selected to design the new Amsterdam Airport Schiphol Terminal, with the help of Arnout Meijer Studio, DGMR and Planeground. Soon to be located south of Schiphol Plaza, at Jan Dellaert Plein, the new 100,500-square-metre terminal will implement futuristic and sustainable design trends.

KAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol - Airport, FacadeKAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol - AirportKAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol - Airport, Facade, LightingKAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol - Airport, Facade, Fence, HandrailKAAN Architecten Designs Glassy New Terminal for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol - More Images+ 8

Bauhaus Among 12 Modern Buildings to Receive Conservation Grants from the Getty Foundation

The Getty Foundation has selected 12 significant 20th century buildings to receive 2017 grants as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative, which aims to advance the understanding and preservation of modern architecture through a focus on conservation planning and research. Since its founding in 2014, the program has supported the preservation of 45 projects from around the globe.

This year $1.66 million in grants were awarded to recognizable projects including the Walter Gropius-designed Bauhaus Building in Dessau; the Melnikov House in Moscow (the first Russian project to receive a grant); and Frank Lloyd Wright’s only skyscraper, Price Tower. 

See all 12 grantees below.

Bauhaus Among 12 Modern Buildings to Receive Conservation Grants from the Getty Foundation - Image 1 of 4Bauhaus Among 12 Modern Buildings to Receive Conservation Grants from the Getty Foundation - Image 2 of 4Bauhaus Among 12 Modern Buildings to Receive Conservation Grants from the Getty Foundation - Image 3 of 4Bauhaus Among 12 Modern Buildings to Receive Conservation Grants from the Getty Foundation - Image 4 of 4Bauhaus Among 12 Modern Buildings to Receive Conservation Grants from the Getty Foundation - More Images+ 8

Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About

Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About - Image 5 of 4

You’re a chipper young first-year student, still soft and tender in the early stages of your induction into the cult of architecture. Apart from fiddling with drafting triangles and furiously scribbling down the newfound jargon that is going to forever change how you communicate, you often find yourself planted in a seat, eyes transfixed to a projector screen as your professor-slash-cult-leader flashes images of the architecture world's masterpieces, patron saints, and divine structures.

Soon, you develop a Pavlovian response: you instinctively recognize these buildings, can name them at once and recite a number of soundbites about their design that have lodged themselves in your brain. Your professor looks on in approval. Since we here at ArchDaily have also partaken in this rite of passage, here are 15 buildings that we all recognize from the rituals of architecture school.

Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About - Image 1 of 4Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About - Image 2 of 4Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About - Image 3 of 4Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About - Image 4 of 4Remember Me? 15 Buildings Your Professors Loved To Talk About - More Images+ 12

Jan Gehl: "The Modern Movement Put an End to the Human Scale"

On Thursday 29 of June, Jan Gehl the Danish architect and urban planner, spoke at the Conference “Thinking urban: cities for people” organised by UN-Habitat and the Official Architects College of Madrid (COAM as it is abbreviated in Spanish) about the urban transformations that have occurred in Copenhagen as a result of the errors of the modernist movement and the challenges facing the cities in the 21st century.

In a prior discussion with José María Ezquiaga (dean of COAM), and José Manuel Calvo (councilor of the Sustainable Development Area at the Madrid city council) at the Conference, Gehl highlighted the urban paradigm at the time of his student years, which is referred to as the Brasilia syndrome. 

What Does Germán Samper See When He Draws?

Hiding out from the gentle Bogotá rain, a cat with turquoise eyes and a black and white coat prowls along the ledge of an office hidden in the midst of lush vegetation. A large window with a wooden frame filters the light and illuminates the interior: a desk, hundreds of books, manila folders, and backlit pictures. Sitting comfortably in his chair, 91-year-old Colombian architect Germán Samper takes a pencil, presses it to the surface of a sheet of paper, and begins to explain everything he is saying by drawing for us in the most clear and simple manner possible.

Whether he's giving instructions on taking a taxi in Bogotá or explaining the recent modifications to the historic Colsubisdio citadel, Samper -- a master of Colombian architecture -- can express ideas on paper with an ease that makes us think that drawing might be very simple, but it's really just a great trick.

Perseverance is key and Samper knows this from experience. "I don't understand why architects don't draw more if it is truly a pleasure," he ponders.

After the break, a conversation with Germán Samper and a series of unedited sketches by the Colombian architect.

Zaha Hadid: “Niemeyer Had an Innate Talent for Sensuality”

The first woman to receive the Pritzker Prize in 2004, Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid tells newspaper El País that she was fortunate as a child to have traveled with her parents and seen some of the world’s most impressive works of architecture and engineering feats.

Awed by the Mosque of Cordoba, Hadid says that the contrast between the darkness and the marble of the central church left a lasting impression, making this one of her favorite works to this day. 

Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio

Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio - Image 1 of 4Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio - Image 2 of 4Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio - Image 3 of 4Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio - Image 4 of 4Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio - More Images+ 56

Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret built sublime works amidst the unique landscape of Chandigarh, at the foothills of the Himalayas. They gave the city a new order, creating new axises, new perspectives and new landmarks. Built in the 1950s and early 1960s, the buildings form one of the most significant architectural complexes of the 20th century, offering a unique experience for visitors.

Architect and photographer Fernanda Antonio has shared photos with us from her journey throughout the city, capturing eight buildings and monuments, with special attention given to Le Corbusier’s Capital Complex. View all of the images after the break.

How Modern Architecture Got Square

This article, by David Brussat of The Providence Journal's editorial board, first appeared at providencejournal.com.

In a rating of energy efficiency by the Environmental Protection Administration, New York's venerable Chrysler Building scored 84 out of 100 points; the Empire State Building, 80; but the modernist 7 World Trade Center scored 74 (below the cutoff of 75 for "high efficiency"); the Pan Am Building, 39; Lever House, 20; the Seagram Building, 3. The New York Times reported this story last Dec. 24 under the headline "City's Law Tracking Energy Use Yields Some Surprises."

It was no surprise to Nikos Salingaros and Michael Mehaffy, who have investigated why modern architecture thrives despite its inability to live up to any of its longstanding promises -- aesthetic, social or utilitarian.

A Crash Course on Modern Architecture (Part 2)

Merete Ahnfeldt-Mollerup is associate Professor at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. This article originally appeared in GRASP.

Miss Part 1? Find it here.

Architecture is inseparable from planning, and the huge challenge for the current generation is the growth and shrinkage of cities. Some cities, mainly in the Southern Hemisphere, are growing at exponential rates, while former global hubs in the northern are turning into countrysides. In the south, populations are still growing a lot, while populations are dwindling in Europe, Russia and North East Asia. The dream of the Bilbao effect was based on the hope that there might be a quick fix to both of these problems. Well, there is not.

A decade ago, few people even recognized this was a real issue and even today it is hardly ever mentioned in a political context. As a politician, you cannot say out loud that you have given up on a huge part of the electorate, or that it makes sense for the national economy to favor another part. Reclaiming the agricultural part of a nation is a political suicide issue whether you are in Europe or Latin America. And investing in urban development in a few, hand-picked areas while other areas are desolate is equally despised.

The one person, who is consistently thinking and writing about this problem, is Rem Koolhaas, a co-founder of OMA.

AD Classics: Villa Mairea / Alvar Aalto

AD Classics: Villa Mairea / Alvar Aalto - Houses, FacadeAD Classics: Villa Mairea / Alvar Aalto - Houses, Garden, ForestAD Classics: Villa Mairea / Alvar Aalto - Houses, Column, Beam, FacadeAD Classics: Villa Mairea / Alvar Aalto - Houses, Column, Beam, Facade, HandrailAD Classics: Villa Mairea / Alvar Aalto - More Images+ 7

A collage of materials amongst the trunks of countless birch trees in the Finnish landscape, the Villa Mairea built by Alvar Aalto in 1939 is a significant dwelling that marks a transition from traditional to modern architecture. Built as a guest house and rural retreat for Harry and Maire Gullichsen, Aalto was given permission to experiment with his thoughts and styles, which becomes clear when studying the strangely cohesive residence.