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Modern Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

"Capital Brutalism" Exhibition Explores Washington D.C's Architectural Legacy in United States

Brutalist buildings are a significant component of Washington, D.C.’s architectural identity. In the National Building Museum’s new exhibition, Capital Brutalism, this identity is explored further. Co-organized with the Southern Utah Museum of Art (SUMA), Capital Brutalism is a comprehensive exhibition of Brutalist architecture in Washington, D.C., to date, running until February 17th, 2025.

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Ana Skobe Wins the Architecture Photography Category at Sony World Photography Awards 2024

The Sony World Photography Awards 2024 has announced its category winners and shortlist, showcasing the best single images from around the world captured during the last year. With over 395,000 submissions from 220 countries and territories, the competition aims to highlight established and emerging photographers from around the world. The Open Competition is divided into 10 category sections, covering a diverse range of themes, from Architecture and Landscape to Portraiture, Lifestyle, and Wildlife photography.

For the Architecture category, ArchDaily collaborator Ana Skobe has been declared the winner with a photograph titled “Falling Out of Time.” Bathed in the soft hues of evening light, a sleek geometric structure rises from the coastal landscape, its clean lines contrasting with the natural elements surrounding it. Positioned at the base of the lighthouse, a solitary figure gives a sense of scale to the composition, as it contemplates the vastness of the ocean.

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Exploring the Grand Egyptian Museum Through Photography: Bridging Past and Present in Cairo

Showcasing millennia of Egyptian history and culture, the Grand Egyptian Museum is a monumental project in Cairo, Egypt, designed by the Irish firm Heneghan Peng Architects. Home to over 100,000 artifacts spanning Egypt’s storied past, the museum is on the brink of opening its doors to the public after multiple setbacks. Recent updates offer glimpses of the structure’s progress, with photographs captured by Egyptian photographer Farida Bustani providing sneak peeks of the architectural landmark.

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Architecture Offices in Taiwan Through the Lens of Marc Goodwin

Further developing his collection of photographic series featuring architecture offices from around the world, Archmospheres photographer Marc Goodwin is now exploring workspaces in Taiwan. Among the included offices are well-known studios such as Fieldoffice Architects, an office whose output has significant cultural importance as they represent an example of Taiwanese Deconstructivist Architecture, in addition to other offices such as KRIS YAO | ARTECH, Divooe Zein Architects, and hii architects.

To create this collection, Marc Goodwin collaborated with Italian architect, publisher, teacher, and curator Alessandro Martinelli, who is based in Taipei. He selected the participants with the help of Mr. Chung-Hsiung Wang, the curator of the Taiwan Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2018. The series will continue to develop with the creation of scale models for each studio, which will be exhibited alongside the photographs in the Taiwan Pavilion of the Venice Biennale.

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Architecture Classics: La Pagoda / Miguel Fisac

Where does the process of mythification of a work in architecture reside? What are the conditions inherently linked to the resource of memory? Firstly, the appearance of an intrinsic value within the architecture, such as highlighting the taste for the projected building. This would be accompanied by the historical factor—the echoes of the era in which it was built. If we add to all this a demolition loaded with theatricality and social drama, the building becomes something more, becoming part of the vast mythical territory of memory. Miguel Fisac's 'Pagoda,' which began construction in 1965, was demolished in just a few days in July 1999, being just over thirty years old at the time of its demolition.

Affectionately known as the 'Pagoda' by the people of Madrid, evidencing its similarity to Asian constructions, it was not held in the same esteem by the architects of the time. In the rise and fall of the JORBA Laboratories, the original name of the project, purely tragic elements converge: denunciations moved by religious conspiracies, neglect by the administrations, speculative businesses, professional jealousy, and rulers incapable of appreciating the quality of architecture that, today, becomes myth or martyr; the object of unjust destruction.

Architecture Classics: Sixth Pantheon of Chacarita

Until recently, the Sixth Pantheon of Chacarita was an icon of Argentine modern architecture that went unnoticed. Located in the heart of the city of Buenos Aires, this pantheon represents one of the first and one of the largest experiments in modern funerary architecture of such magnitude in the world.

Climat de France: Colonial Social Housing in Algeria by Fernand Pouillon

The Climat de France is a French colonial social housing project in Algeria designed by Fernand Pouillon and currently renamed Oued Koriche. Located approximately 8km west of the country’s capital, Algiers, it was built from 1954 to 1957, right in the middle of the Algerian War of Independence. The project has several buildings with different scales. Its most prominent structure is a large rectangular building that houses 3000 dwellings, along with a spacious interior square similar to a Roman forum and exterior windows inspired by the mosaics found in Islamic architecture.

This social housing scheme has a complex history, involving the integration of Algerians into the French lifestyle, the use of modern architecture to challenge traditional Muslim ways of living, and the transformation of its collective square into a site of protest and rebellion.

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Casa Gomis by Antonio Bonet and Modern Architecture in Catalonia, Through the Lens of Arnau Rovira

In 2021, the Government of Catalonia recognized Casa Gomis, designed by the architect Antoni Bonet Castellana for the Gomis-Bertrand family between 1949 and 1956, as a Cultural Heritage of National Interest in the category of Historical Monument.

Designed from a distance in Argentina, 'La Ricarda,' as the residence is also known due to its proximity to the eponymous pond, which recently became the center of debate over the expansion of Barcelona Airport, stands out for its vaulted roof and glazed enclosures that engage with the surroundings of Prat de Llobregat.

Modern Mirage: Paul Clemence's Installation Transforms the Architecture of Pampulha

A mirage can refer to an optical phenomenon caused by the refraction of light on certain surfaces, creating the illusion of a liquefied appearance. It can also represent an illusion, where something appears to be different from what it actually is. Paul Clemence capitalizes on this dual interpretation in his photographic essay, Modern Mirage, which features Casa do Baile (now the Reference Center for Architecture, Urbanism, and Design), the Art Museum, and the Church of Pampulha. He captures these iconic structures as they are reflected in the water mirrors of the modern complex designed by Oscar Niemeyer in Belo Horizonte, MG.

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Demolished and Rebuilt: The Identity of Architectural Replicas

The rights to reconstruct Kisho Kurokawa's iconic Nakagin Capsule Tower are currently sold on one of the largest NFT sites. While the tower’s demolition has begun earlier this year, the auction sells the right to rebuild the structure, in both the metaverse and in real space. The idea of recreating the Metabolic building in a virtual space seems natural. It could allow a larger community to explore an iconic piece of architecture and encourage them to experiment with it, an initiative in line with Metabolist ideals. On the other hand, the idea of reconstructing a demolished historical building in the physical world raises a different set of conflicting emotions. Architectural replicas are not the norm, but their existence raises questions regarding the identity and authenticity of works of architecture.

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Niemeyer, Le Corbusier, and the History of the United Nations Headquarters Project

In 1945, the declaration of the end of World War II brought a wave of euphoria to the streets, and optimism permeated the atmosphere with the promise of brighter days. Inspired by this newfound hope, the United Nations Organization (UN) was established in the same year. The vibrant city of New York was chosen as the headquarters location, and an international team of carefully selected and invited architects was tasked with conceiving the project.

For this ambitious and truly international project, eleven renowned architects were brought together from various corners of the world. These architects, often known for their inflated egos, a common trait in their profession, were accustomed to exercising full control over their architectural designs and even their respective countries. They had to coexist in the same space and collaborate on a single project. The successful collaboration on this project would be a compelling demonstration of the possibility of achieving world peace.

Modernity in Mendoza: Pavilion 24 at the Feria de América International Exhibition

The city of Mendoza, Argentina, hosted the international event known as the "Feria de América," an industrial and continental exhibition that took place from January to April 1954. To provide a suitable setting for the exhibition, 30 hectares of land were allocated around the perimeter of Lake Parque General San Martín. Here, 93 pavilions and nearly 20 facilities were set up, including the Allegorical Tower, an open-air theater, and bars. The American countries represented with their own pavilions were Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and Paraguay. There was also a large pavilion that housed various Latin American countries such as Colombia, Cuba, Bolivia, El Salvador, Honduras, and Mexico, along with stands for Chilean and local Mendoza-based companies and provincial pavilions for Mendoza, San Juan, Misiones, La Rioja, Eva Perón (now La Pampa), Juan Domingo Perón (now Chaco), Córdoba, Corrientes, Santa Fe, Tucumán, and Buenos Aires. Additionally, there were stands and premises for various trade chambers (Quiroga, 2012). The fair embodied the government's aspiration to showcase a thriving, prosperous Argentina that was connected to regional countries and at the forefront of industrial development.