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Brutalism

The House of Soviets: Why Should This Symbolic Work of Soviet Brutalism be Preserved?

10:30 - 1 July, 2018
© Maria Gonzalez
© Maria Gonzalez

© Maria Gonzalez © Maria Gonzalez © Maria Gonzalez © Maria Gonzalez + 20

The House of Soviets is a Russian brutalist building designed by architect Yulian L. Shvartsbreim. Located in the center of Kaliningrad, the building has been abandoned since mid-construction. However, its inhabitants recognize it as the most important urban landmark in their city. They usually refer to the structure as "the face of the robot," since its strange shape conjures images of a robot buried up to its neck, only showing its face.

Photographic Gallery Captures the Rough Brutalism of Toronto's Andrews Building

08:00 - 22 June, 2018
© Ruta Krau
© Ruta Krau

Toronto-based photographer Ruta Krau has captured stunning photographs of the Andrews Building, one of Canada’s most noted brutalist buildings, and a celebrated part of Toronto's concrete architecture. Designed by John Andrews, architect of Toronto’s iconic CN Tower, the Andrews Building embodies the Modernist ethos of connecting with the surrounding environment, balanced above a ravine and emerging as a stepped pyramid from a natural ridge.

Krau’s photographs capture the rough, natural aesthetic of the Modernist building, with béton brut concrete stamped with the patterns of the timber used to mold the poured-concrete structure. Visible on both the interior and exterior, this texture compliments terra-cotta-colored floor tiles and wood-paneled feature walls.

© Ruta Krau © Ruta Krau © Ruta Krau © Ruta Krau + 19

Fly Back in Time with These Brutalist Cuckoo Clocks

12:00 - 15 June, 2018
© Guido Zimmermann
© Guido Zimmermann

Coffee machines and garden gnomes aside, Brutalist fanatics have a new means of expressing their love for the controversial modernist style, with credit to Frankfurt-based artist Guido Zimmermann. His beautifully-crafted “Cuckoo Blocks” reinvent the traditional Black Forest cuckoo clock with a modernist Brutalism inspired by the architecture of the late 1960s.

More than an aesthetic centerpiece for Brutalist fanatics, the clocks are in fact a response to a decline in the middle class caused by increasing rent prices in modern metropolises. 

© Guido Zimmermann © Guido Zimmermann © Guido Zimmermann © Guido Zimmermann + 16

Meet NINO, the Edgy, Brutalist Gnome

06:00 - 23 May, 2018
Meet NINO, the Edgy, Brutalist Gnome, Courtesy of Plato Design
Courtesy of Plato Design

If you think you’ve seen this handsome fella before, you have; except he was wearing a flashy red hat and an old blue robe, attempting to protect your house from thieves. Luckily, gnomes have gotten quite the modern makeover. Thanks to the collaboration between Plato Design and designer Pellegrino Cucciniello, you can finally get rid of the kitschy little guy, and replace him with NINO, the modern, brutalist gnome. 

Courtesy of Plato Design Courtesy of Plato Design Courtesy of Plato Design Courtesy of Plato Design + 23

London's Landmark Brutalist "Space House" Is Captured in a Different Light in this Photo Essay

09:30 - 13 May, 2018
© Ste Murray
© Ste Murray

Appreciated within the industry but often maligned by the general public, brutalism came to define post-war architecture in the UK, as well as many countries around the world. In his 1955 article The New Brutalism, Reyner Banham states it must have “1, Formal legibility of plan; 2, clear exhibition of structure, and 3, valuation of materials for their inherent qualities as found.”

One Kemble Street, a 16-story cylindrical office block originally named "Space House" and designed by George Marsh and Richard Seifert, clearly exhibits all of these characteristics, creating a landmark in the heart of London that remains as striking today as it was upon its completion in 1968. Photographing the Grade-II listed building throughout the day, photographer Ste Murray manages to beautifully capture the building’s essence, celebrating its 50 year anniversary while also highlighting the intrigue of its form in a way that suggests parallels to contrasting ideologies.

© Ste Murray © Ste Murray © Ste Murray © Ste Murray + 23

Spotlight: William Pereira

10:30 - 25 April, 2018
Spotlight: William Pereira, Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley
Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley

Winner of the 1942 Acadamy Award for Best Special Effects, William Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) also designed some of America's most iconic examples of futurist architecture, with his heavy stripped down functionalism becoming the symbol of many US institutions and cities. Working with his more prolific film-maker brother Hal Pereira, William Pereira's talent as an art director translated into a long and prestigious career creating striking and idiosyncratic buildings across the West Coast of America.

Transamerica Pyramid. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jkz/6371624443'>Flickr user jkz</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Thene Building, LAX. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132084522@N05/16747302728'>Flickr user Sam valadi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). ImageCourtesy of <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:UCILibrary.jpg'>Wikimedia user TFNorman</a> (public domain) Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley + 12

Exhibition: Brutal Destruction

16:00 - 5 April, 2018
Exhibition: Brutal Destruction, Robin Hood Gardens, UK. Image © Oliver Wainwright
Robin Hood Gardens, UK. Image © Oliver Wainwright

Modernity certainly does not have to be characterized by ugliness, but we may well have to make some revisions in our standards of beauty.
— Edward J. Logue

pinkcomma gallery is proud to present Brutal Destruction, photographs of concrete architecture at the moment of its demise. The exhibit is curated by Chris Grimley of the architecture office over,under. The exhibit opens 12 April, 2018 from 6–9 p.m., and the will be on display through May 03, 2018.

Prentice Women's Hospital, Chicago, IL. Image © David Schalliol Mechanic Theatre, Baltimore, MD. Image © Matthew Carbone Third Church of Christ, Washington, DC. Image © Rey Lopez Shoreline Apartments, Buffalo, NY. Image © David Torke + 11

Spotlight: Gottfried Böhm

06:00 - 23 January, 2018
Spotlight: Gottfried Böhm, Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The career of Gottfried Böhm (born January 23, 1920) spans from simple to complex and from sacred to secular, but has always maintained a commitment to understanding its surroundings. In 1986, Böhm was awarded the eighth Pritzker Prize for what the jury described as his "uncanny and exhilarating marriage" of architectural elements from past and present. Böhm's unique use of materials, as well as his rejection of historical emulation, have made him an influential force in Germany and abroad.

Neviges Mariendom. Image © Yuri PALMIN St. Theresia Church (1955-1956) in Mülheim, Germany. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:St_theresia_koeln-buchheim_20090215.jpg'>Wikimedia user Elya</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> St. Josef Church (1957) in Grevenbroich, Germany. Image © <a href='https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Datei:Grevenbroich_St._Joseph_1_2009.jpg'>Wikimedia user Elya</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Bensberg Town Hall (1963-1969) in Bensberg,Germany. Image © <a href=‘https://www.flickr.com/photos/seier/3301293417’>Flickr user seier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 8

Why the Restoration of the Southbank Undercroft Is a Landmark for Both Architecture and Skateboarding

09:30 - 10 November, 2017
Why the Restoration of the Southbank Undercroft Is a Landmark for Both Architecture and Skateboarding, Artist's interpretation of the restored Undercroft. Image © Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios
Artist's interpretation of the restored Undercroft. Image © Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

The Southbank Undercroft, which lies beneath the Queen Elizabeth Hall along the River Thames in London, has been the subject of much debate in recent years following a proposed closure and redevelopment in 2013. Long Live Southbank, an organization born out of this threat of expulsion, gave the diverse community who call the space home a voice. After 17 months of campaigning, they were successful in ensuring the Undercroft was legally protected and fully recognized as an asset of community value. Since then, the group of activists has begun another groundbreaking journey.

In partnership with Southbank Centre, Long Live Southbank recently launched a new crowdfunding campaign to restore the legendary Undercroft. The restoration project will cost £790,000 and is set to open in 2018, improving Londoners’ access to free creative spaces in the heart of the City. These types of space are becoming increasingly rare and the restoration effort reflects a desire to celebrate the authentic cultural sites that make London the vibrant landscape it is.

© Nicholas Constant © Nicholas Constant © Nicholas Constant © Nicholas Constant + 11

New Map Celebrates New York City’s Brutalist Concrete Architecture

06:00 - 10 October, 2017
© Jason Woods for Blue Crow Media
© Jason Woods for Blue Crow Media

Finally, a brutalist map of New York City, thanks to London-based publisher, Blue Crow Media. The Concrete New York Map marks the tenth map in the architectural guide series, highlighting over fifty of The City’s finest concrete buildings.

Not often thought of as a brutalist capitol, the concrete jungle is filled with remarkable buildings by Breuer, Pei, Rudolph, Saarinen, Wright, alongside lesser-known works, mapped out, photographed, and paired with a description of the building. The map is edited by Allison Meier, and adorned with Jason Woods’ photography and is the perfect pocket guide for any architect or brutalism lover.

Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media + 8

10 Iconic Brutalist Buildings in Latin America

08:00 - 8 October, 2017
10 Iconic Brutalist Buildings in Latin America, via Flickr User: Renovación República CC BY 2.0
via Flickr User: Renovación República CC BY 2.0

This article was originally published by KatariMag, a blog that explores the history of contemporary culture in its most sophisticated and fresh expression. Follow their Instagram and read more of their articles here

Brutalist architecture responds to a specific moment in history. As WWII was coming to an end, a new form of State was rising from the ashes, along with a global order that would include and increase the relevance of peripheral nations. Brutalist architecture was born as a response to the ideas of the robust nations that would lead the masses. Critic Michael Lewis said, "brutalism is the vernacular expression of the welfare state."

Espresso Yourself With This Brutalist Coffee Machine

16:00 - 1 October, 2017
Espresso Yourself With This Brutalist Coffee Machine, Courtesy of Montaag
Courtesy of Montaag

Architects and coffee go hand in hand. The aesthetic of the espresso maker has become a mundane part of the morning ritual. The designers at Montaag are changing that with the release of AnZa  a show-stopping espresso maker made of concrete. After four years of prototyping and testing, the espresso maker is equipped with high-tech functionality for important things, like remotely brewing your cup as an incentive to get out of bed. 

Courtesy of Montaag Courtesy of Montaag Courtesy of Montaag Courtesy of Montaag + 12

AD Classics: Neviges Mariendom / Gottfried Böhm

08:00 - 1 September, 2017
AD Classics: Neviges Mariendom / Gottfried Böhm, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Standing like a concrete mountain amid a wood, the jagged concrete volume of the Neviges Mariendom [“Cathedral of Saint Mary of Neviges”] towers over its surroundings. Built on a popular pilgrimage site in western Germany, the Mariendom is only the latest iteration of a monastery that has drawn countless visitors and pilgrims from across the world for centuries. Unlike its medieval and Baroque predecessors, however, the unabashedly Modernist Mariendom reflects a significant shift in the outlook of its creators: a new way of thinking for both the people of post-war Germany and the wider Catholic Church.

© Yuri Palmin © Yuri Palmin © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 22

Demolition is Underway on Alison and Peter Smithson's Robin Hood Gardens in London

15:05 - 29 August, 2017
Demolition is Underway on Alison and Peter Smithson's Robin Hood Gardens in London, via <a href='http://https://twitter.com/saverobinhood/status/900359306658369536'>Twitter user @saverobinhood</a>
via Twitter user @saverobinhood

Demolition has officially commenced on East London housing development Robin Hood Gardens, bringing to an end any chance of a last-minute preservation effort for the Brutalist icon. Designed by British architects Alison and Peter Smithson and completed in 1972, plans for the site’s clearing and redevelopment have been in the works for more than five years, before government indecision and a spirited protest campaign led by architects including Richard Rogers, Zaha Hadid, Robert Venturi, and Toyo Ito put those plans in doubt.

New Map Celebrates Boston’s Brutalist Architecture

06:00 - 16 August, 2017
New Map Celebrates Boston’s Brutalist Architecture, Courtesy of Chris Grimley, Michael Kubo, and Mark Pasnik
Courtesy of Chris Grimley, Michael Kubo, and Mark Pasnik

In their ninth architectural city guide, London-based publisher Blue Crow Media highlights the city of Boston’s Brutalist buildings. The map was produced in collaboration with the principles of the firm over,under Chris Grimley and Mark Pasnik along with Michael Kubo, who together authored the book “Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston.” The map highlights more than forty examples of Brutalist architecture around the greater-Boston area.

Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Chris Grimley, Michael Kubo, and Mark Pasnik Courtesy of Chris Grimley, Michael Kubo, and Mark Pasnik Courtesy of Blue Crow Media + 8

Sydney’s Brutalist Sirius Building Saved from Demolition after Court Ruling

16:30 - 25 July, 2017
Sydney’s Brutalist Sirius Building Saved from Demolition after Court Ruling, © <a href='http://www.flickr.com/photos/andreas/2951113717'>Flickr user andreas</a>. Licensed under CC BY 2.0
© Flickr user andreas. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

In a major victory for preservationists, one of Sydney’s few examples of brutalist architecture, the Sirius Apartment Building, has been saved from the wrecking ball after court ruled against the government’s attempt to deny it a place on the State Heritage Register.

C.F. Møller to Lead Design of Project Replacing Alison and Peter Smithson’s Robin Hood Gardens

14:45 - 29 June, 2017
C.F. Møller to Lead Design of Project Replacing Alison and Peter Smithson’s Robin Hood Gardens, Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects
Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

The Swan Housing Association has announced the appointment of Danish firm C.F. Møller to join Haworth Tompkins and Metropolitan Workshop in designing housing projects for the Blackwall Reach regeneration plan, a £300 million redevelopment effort which will replace Alison and Peter Smithson’s Brutalist east London estate, Robin Hood Gardens.

As leaders of Phase 3 of the plan, C.F. Møller will design housing for the eastern portion of the site. A total of 330 one- to five-bedroom residential units, half of which have been designated as affordable, will be located within a courtyard block complex at the edge of an existing garden mound – one of the few elements of the original estate that will be retained. The garden is planned to be replanted and renamed the “Millennium Green.” 

New Map Celebrates Sydney’s Brutalist Architecture

16:00 - 30 April, 2017
New Map Celebrates Sydney’s Brutalist Architecture , Sydney Town Hall. Image © Glenn Harper
Sydney Town Hall. Image © Glenn Harper

Sydney is the latest city spotlighted by city map publisher Blue Crow Media, with the release of their fourth map of Brutalist architecture. Produced in collaboration with Glenn Harper, Senior Associate at PTW Architects and founder of @Brutalist_Project_Sydney, Brutalist Sydney Map showcases over 50 examples of the architectural style across the New South Wales (NSW) city and suburbs.

“This map not only guides the reader to discover many of Sydney’s oldest and historically important Brutalist buildings, it enables a unique encounter of Sydney and its varied urban and harbor side landscapes,” expressed Harper.

Birdura Children's Court. Image © Glenn Harper Sirius Apartments. Image © Glenn Harper Ku-Ring-Gai College. Image © Glenn Harper © Glenn Harper + 9