1. ArchDaily
  2. Heritage

Heritage: The Latest Architecture and News

Designed by Louis Kahn, the Complex at IIM in Ahmedabad Faces the Thread of Demolition Once Again

On November 3rd, 2022, the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad (IIMA) announced the decision to end the restoration works for elements of the campus designed by Louis Kahn with Indian architects Balkrishna V. Doshi and Anant Raje in 1962. The decision affects the faculty blocks, classroom complex, and dorms other than dorm D15. According to the statement, the institution plans to replace some of the buildings, as the complex is “facing structural damage, deterioration and have become uninhabitable, posing a safety concern for the campus's residents.” This represents a reversal of the decision to withdraw the first demolition plans following global protests, announced in January 2021.

Designed by Louis Kahn, the Complex at IIM in Ahmedabad Faces the Thread of Demolition Once Again - Image 1 of 4Designed by Louis Kahn, the Complex at IIM in Ahmedabad Faces the Thread of Demolition Once Again - Image 2 of 4Designed by Louis Kahn, the Complex at IIM in Ahmedabad Faces the Thread of Demolition Once Again - Image 3 of 4Designed by Louis Kahn, the Complex at IIM in Ahmedabad Faces the Thread of Demolition Once Again - Image 4 of 4Designed by Louis Kahn, the Complex at IIM in Ahmedabad Faces the Thread of Demolition Once Again - More Images+ 6

How to Use the Metaverse to Preserve Historic Buildings

Imagine that you have scheduled a visit to an important building for the history of architecture, a reference work for all enthusiasts. Probably you would equip yourself with a camera or a good cell phone, take a pencil, notebook and even a measuring tape to record all its aspects.

However, this is not the only way to “visit” a building of historical importance nowadays or, at least, that is what some researchers are trying to show. The metaverse is being explored for its role in architecture and culture preservation, embracing different generations.

Chile Has a Lot to Say about Restoration: 5 Works That Recover and Revalue Heritage

Chile has a rich and vast heritage architecture, which is gradually gaining relevance through different initiatives that seek to renovate these buildings to give them a second life. The buildings and infrastructures were in disrepair, disused, or damaged, but have great architectural value, being an important contribution to the reconstruction of the history of Chilean cities.

10 National Monuments You Can Find in Valparaiso, Chile

We often walk through the city without knowing the value of the buildings around us. In Chile, there is an architectural multiculturalism that has molded the cities with buildings that, to this day, are awarded a heritage title and are not recognized as such by the inhabitants and visitors.

10 National Monuments You Can Find in Valparaiso, Chile - Imagen 1 de 410 National Monuments You Can Find in Valparaiso, Chile - Imagen 2 de 410 National Monuments You Can Find in Valparaiso, Chile - Imagen 3 de 410 National Monuments You Can Find in Valparaiso, Chile - Imagen 4 de 410 National Monuments You Can Find in Valparaiso, Chile - More Images+ 13

Sometimes, the Better Alternative Is Not to Build New Things

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

My first encounter with saving a building landed me in handcuffs and a trip to the Long Beach Police Department. A friend and I were frustrated that our hometown was demolishing good buildings—because they did not conform with the current style of architecture—only to replace them with parking lots! All in the name of “progress.” In 1988, when we learned that the Jergins Trust Building, a Beaux-Arts beauty, was slated to be torn down with no plans for the site, we jumped into action and chained ourselves to the building to stop the wrecking crew. Our efforts kept it up for another four hours. And then it was gone forever.

“Turning Challenges into Opportunities”: In Conversation with East Architecture Studio, One of the Winners of the 2020-2022 Aga Khan Award

This year, one of the winners of the Aga Khan Award was the Renovation of the Niemeyer Guest House by East Architecture Studio. The project is located on Tripoli’s outskirts in Lebanon, and it is part of the Rachid Karami International Fair (RKIF), an unfinished masterpiece by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer. ArchDaily’s Managing Editor, Christele Harrouk had the chance to sit with Charles Kettaneh and Nicolas Fayad, founders of the East Architecture Studio, on-site in "the Niemeyer Guest House Renovation" project. Talking about modern heritage and the challenges of renovations, the architects opened the conversation about the role of architecture in building platforms for change.

“Turning Challenges into Opportunities”: In Conversation with East Architecture Studio, One of the Winners of the 2020-2022 Aga Khan Award - Imagen 4 de 4“Turning Challenges into Opportunities”: In Conversation with East Architecture Studio, One of the Winners of the 2020-2022 Aga Khan Award - Imagen 1 de 4“Turning Challenges into Opportunities”: In Conversation with East Architecture Studio, One of the Winners of the 2020-2022 Aga Khan Award - Imagen 2 de 4“Turning Challenges into Opportunities”: In Conversation with East Architecture Studio, One of the Winners of the 2020-2022 Aga Khan Award - Imagen 6 de 4“Turning Challenges into Opportunities”: In Conversation with East Architecture Studio, One of the Winners of the 2020-2022 Aga Khan Award - More Images+ 6

Barrio Yungay Was Selected as One of the Most Attractive Neighbourhoods in the World by the British Magazine Time Out

The British magazine Time Out has selected Barrio Yungay in Santiago, Chile, as one of the most attractive neighborhoods in the world. The neighborhood was selected under the Time Out Index survey, where respondents from different countries answered the question "What is the most attractive place in your city at the moment?" and was ranked ninth out of a list of 51 neighborhoods, including Colonia Americana in Guadalajara, Shimokitazawa in Tokyo and Cours Julien in Marseille.

Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism

Selldorf Architects have released a revised version of the plans to remodel the National Gallery and the Sainsbury Wing, both classified as Grade-I-listed monuments. Sainsbury Wing is also the recipient of the 2019 AIA Twenty-five Year Award. The plans for the Sainsbury Wing, designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown and opened in 1991, have faced intense criticism, with former RIBA Journal editor Hugh Pearman calling the remodeling plans “unnecessarily destructive”. The plans to remodel were first revealed earlier this year as part of the NG200 Project to celebrate the National Gallery’s bicentennial in 2024. The project proposes the remodeling of the Sainsbury Wing’s front gates, ground-floor entrance sequence, lobby, and first-floor spaces.

Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 6 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 7 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 1 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 2 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - More Images+ 9

Kampala on a Global Stage: Doreen Adengo’s Cross-Disciplinary Legacy

Doreen Adengo, Ugandan architect and trailblazer, passed away on July the 22nd of this year, after battling a long-term illness. She founded Adengo Architecture, a studio based out of her home city of Kampala. A designer who studied in the United States, worked in firms in New York, Washington, and London, and was teaching at Uganda Martyrs University – her legacy is nothing short of extraordinary. It is a legacy that spans disciplines and geographies – but a legacy, too, that is deeply rooted in the context of Africa, Uganda, and Kampala.

Kampala on a Global Stage: Doreen Adengo’s Cross-Disciplinary Legacy - Image 1 of 4Kampala on a Global Stage: Doreen Adengo’s Cross-Disciplinary Legacy - Image 2 of 4Kampala on a Global Stage: Doreen Adengo’s Cross-Disciplinary Legacy - Image 3 of 4Kampala on a Global Stage: Doreen Adengo’s Cross-Disciplinary Legacy - Image 4 of 4Kampala on a Global Stage: Doreen Adengo’s Cross-Disciplinary Legacy - More Images+ 7

What Do We Do With the Houses of Empire?

In June 2020, the statue of 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston was toppled in the southwestern city of Bristol in England. Before this, the statue sat on a plinth in a prominent public park, before being hauled into Bristol Harbour by Black Lives Matter protestors. This act has led to a long-overdue reckoning in the UK and other Western nations, a reckoning that has necessitated a deeper analysis of monuments that line cities, and how deeply imperialism can be interlinked with parts of the built environment. The ever-green question is, what do we do with these buildings?

What Do We Do With the Houses of Empire? - Image 1 of 4What Do We Do With the Houses of Empire? - Image 2 of 4What Do We Do With the Houses of Empire? - Image 3 of 4What Do We Do With the Houses of Empire? - Image 4 of 4What Do We Do With the Houses of Empire? - More Images+ 6

Architecture at the Service of Science: Jantar Mantar, Astronomical Observatories in India

Architecture at the Service of Science: Jantar Mantar, Astronomical Observatories in India - Image 3 of 4
Jantar Mantar, Nova Delhi. Photo by Matthias Alberti (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

"in downtown New Delhi, huge curved structures sink in the ground, taking the form of a ramp. Amorphous voids mark the great twisted walls. The color red marks the structures and sets them apart from everything else."

This could describe a playground or even a skate park, but it is one of five astronomical observatories built in India between 1724 and 1738. These mazy volumes, which look more like a materialization of Escher's drawings, were conceived by the Indian prince Jai Singh as part of an ambitious project that sought to put architecture at the service of science. Their shapes make complex astronomical analysis possible, such as predicting eclipses, tracking the location of stars, and determining Earth's exact orbit around the Sun.

UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage

UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage - Featured Image
Photo by Dima Pima on Unsplash . ImageLviv

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has expressed concern over the damage caused to historic landmarks in Ukraine and called for the protection of its cultural heritage. At the same time, the organization has taken action within its capabilities to help safeguard the endangered sites. Ukraine is home to seven World Heritage sites, including the 11th-century Saint-Sophia Cathedral and the entire ensemble of the Historic Centre of Lviv. In addition, several sites in the recently damaged cities of Kharkiv and Chernihiv were on the tentative list for potential nomination to World Heritage status.

UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage - Image 1 of 4UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage - Image 2 of 4UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage - Image 3 of 4UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage - Image 4 of 4UNESCO Expresses Deep Concern Over Ukrainian Landmarks and Takes Action to Protect Endangered Heritage - More Images

The House on the River: Restoration after Eight Decades of Attacks

It was designed and built between 1943 and 1946 by Amancio Williams and Delfina Galvez Bunge over the Las Chacras Stream in the city of Mar del Plata. It eventually became known as "The House on the River" or "The Bridge House". However, it ceased to have a stream, and thus to be a bridge, in 1957 when the watercourse on which it rested was interrupted for sanitation reasons. It was used as a radio station between 1970 and 1977, but the last military dictatorship in Argentina ended up shutting it down. It remained closed, maintained by its owner until their death in 1991. Studied by all, but cared for by none. It suffered two major fires, in 2004 and 2008. Abandoned during the whole succession process, it was recovered by the Municipality of General Pueyrredón in 2012.

The Spanish Government Approves the Law on Quality in Architecture

How can the quality of architecture be protected, promoted and encouraged? A question on which progress was made today in Spain. On the 18th of January, the Council of Ministers approved the Draft Law on Quality in Architecture for its subsequent submission to the Spanish Parliament, thus initiating its parliamentary procedure.

This is a new legislative proposal, promoted by the Ministry of Transport, Mobility and Urban Agenda, currently under the direction of Minister Raquel Sánchez Jiménez, who aims to protect, promote and encourage architectural quality as an asset of general interest, promoting links that encourage the rapprochement of architecture with society.

What Would the Unfinished Metlife North Building in New York Have Looked Like?

90Grados specialises in creating high-quality architectural renderings - and this time they present the virtual construction of a skyscraper that was left unfinished in New York after the Great Depression of 1929: the Metropolitan Life North Building.

The Building That Moved: How Did They Move an 11,000-Ton Telephone Exchange Without Suspending Its Operations?

In November 1930, in Indiana, United States, one of the great feats of modern engineering was executed: a team of architects and engineers moved an 11,000-ton (22-million pound) telephone exchange without ever suspending its operations either basic supplies for the 600 employees who worked inside.

Interventions in Pre-existing Architecture: Adaptive Reuse Projects by Renowned Architects

Responsible use and consumption of natural resources and the impacts of the building industry have been ongoing concerns in the field of architecture and urban planning. In the past, concepts such as clean slates, mass demolitions, and building brand new structures were widely accepted and encouraged. Nowadays, a transformation seems to be taking place, calling for new approaches such as recycling, adaptive reuse, and renovations, taking advantage of what is already there. This article explores a selection of projects and provides a glimpse into interventions by renowned architects in pre-existing buildings.

Interventions in Pre-existing Architecture: Adaptive Reuse Projects by Renowned Architects - Image 1 of 4Interventions in Pre-existing Architecture: Adaptive Reuse Projects by Renowned Architects - Image 2 of 4Interventions in Pre-existing Architecture: Adaptive Reuse Projects by Renowned Architects - Image 3 of 4Interventions in Pre-existing Architecture: Adaptive Reuse Projects by Renowned Architects - Image 4 of 4Interventions in Pre-existing Architecture: Adaptive Reuse Projects by Renowned Architects - More Images+ 4