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Comfort: The Latest Architecture and News

Lighting and Visual Comfort Solutions in Residential Projects

Solar radiation is one of the most important criteria in architectural projects, as it impacts several decisions ranging from the orientation of the building on the site to the choice of windows and doors. Therefore, to ensure the quality of lighting and visual comfort in building interiors, it is crucial to study the sun path and the quantity of sunlight in each given space.

NB Residence / Jacobsen Arquitetura. Image: © Fernando Guerra | FG+SGOwnerless House nº 01 / Vão. Image: © Pedro KokKS Residence / Arquitetos Associados. Image: © Joana FrançaAtlântica House / AR Arquitetos. Image: © Federico Cairoli+ 7

How to Ensure Comfort and Well-Being in Small Spaces?

While some aspects of comfort and well-being in an indoor environment are related to external factors, such as natural lighting and ventilation, others are directly associated with the interior layout and the sensations created by architecture in the people living in that space.

It is always challenging to balance all of the elements that can provide greater comfort and well-being in interior design, particularly in small environments that must be fully optimized since it is not always possible to create large openings to the outside or even to accommodate the whole architectural program in a conventional manner.

Apartment in Saint Andreu / Oriol Garcia Muñoz. Image: © Aitor EstévezAppartement Spectral / BETILLON / DORVAL‐BORY. Courtesy of BETILLON / DORVAL‐BORYYojigen Poketto / elii. Image: © Miguel de Guzmán + Rocío Romero | ImagenSubliminalU-shape room / Atelier tao+c. Image: © Fangfang Tian+ 15

Olfactory Comfort in Architecture and the Impact of Odors on Well-Being

Cooking shows have never been more popular around the world than they are now. Whether from recipes, reality shows, or documentaries, writer Michael Pollan points out that it is not uncommon to spend more time watching than preparing our own food. This is a very curious phenomenon, as we can only imagine the tastes and smells on the other side of the screen, which the presenters often like to remind us. At the same time, when we watch something about the Middle Ages, polluted rivers, or nuclear disasters, we are relieved that there is no technology to transmit smells across the screen. In fact, when dealing with odors (more specifically the bad ones), we know how unpleasant it is to be in a space that doesn't smell good. When dealing with buildings, what are the main sources of bad smells and how can this affect our health and well-being?