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UNStudio Named Winner of Landmark Melbourne Skyscraper Competition

04:00 - 15 August, 2018
UNStudio Named Winner of Landmark Melbourne Skyscraper Competition , Green Spine / UNStudio + Cox Architecture . Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture
Green Spine / UNStudio + Cox Architecture . Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture

UNStudio and Cox Architecture have officially been announced as the winners of Melbourne’s landmark Southbank Precinct overhaul. Selected from a range of high-profile offices, including BIG, OMA, and MAD, UNStudio's vision for the $2 billion project includes a pair of twisted towers called Green Spine. As the largest single-phase project in the history of Victoria, Australia, the Green Spine is designed as a state-of-the-art, mixed-use environment centered around innovation in architecture and design.

Green Spine. Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture Green Spine. Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture Green Spine. Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture Green Spine. Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture + 30

OMA, BIG, and UNStudio Among Prominent Firms to Reveal Visions for Landmark Melbourne Southbank

12:30 - 27 July, 2018
OMA, BIG, and UNStudio Among Prominent Firms to Reveal Visions for Landmark Melbourne Southbank, The Lanescraper. Image Courtesy of BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group / Fender Katsalidis Architects
The Lanescraper. Image Courtesy of BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group / Fender Katsalidis Architects

A prominent shortlist including BIG, OMA, and UNStudio have revealed their visions for Melbourne’s landmark Southbank Precinct overhaul. The $2 billion project will be the largest single-phase project in the history of Victoria, Australia, intended as “a state-of-the-art, mixed-use environment” to be “centered around innovation in architecture and design.”

The six shortlisted schemes include twisting towers, interlocking blocks, and stacked neighborhoods, all focusing on the 6,000-square-meter BMW Southbank site. The designs were revealed at a public symposium on July 27th featuring speakers from the shortlisted firms.

Urban Tree. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects / Elenberg Fraser Urban Tree. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects / Elenberg Fraser Stack. Image Courtesy of MVRDV / Woods Bagot Green Spine. Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture + 24

Form Follows Energy

09:55 - 10 June, 2018
Form Follows Energy, Book cover, Form Follows Energy, Photo: Hatice Cody
Book cover, Form Follows Energy, Photo: Hatice Cody

Architecture is energy. Lines drawn on paper to represent architectural intentions also imply decades and sometimes centuries of associated energy and material flows. “Form Follows Energy” is about the relationship between energy and the form of our built environment. It examines the optimisation of energy flows in building and urban design and the implications for form and configuration. It speaks to both architectural and engineering audiences and offers for the first time a truly interdisciplinary overview on the subject, explaining the complex relationships between energy and architecture in an easy to follow manner and using simple diagrams to show how

BIG, OMA, and MVRDV Among Shortlisted Firms for Melbourne Landmark Competition

12:00 - 27 April, 2018
BIG, OMA, and MVRDV Among Shortlisted Firms for Melbourne Landmark Competition, via Southbank by Beulah
via Southbank by Beulah

The shortlist for a new landmark project in Melbourne has been announced, comprising award-winning global architects such as Bjarke Ingels Group, MVRDV, and OMA. For the “Southbank by Beulah” mixed-use development, the shortlisted architects will engage in a design competition working in collaboration with local Australian firms, each producing a design proposal for Melbourne’s BMW Southbank site.

With an end value in excess of $2 billion, Southbank by Beulah will be the first large-scale private project adhering to the Australian Institute of Architecture guidelines, while the design competition will be chaired by a jury of seven regarded individuals from academic, architectural, property and government sectors.

PANEUM Center / Coop Himmelb(l)au

09:00 - 17 October, 2017
PANEUM Center / Coop Himmelb(l)au, © Markus Pillhofer
© Markus Pillhofer

© Markus Pillhofer © Markus Pillhofer © Markus Pillhofer © Markus Pillhofer + 39

  • Architects

  • Location

    Asten, Austria
  • Design Principal

    Wolf D. Prix
  • Project Team

    Albara Arab, Martina Bighignoli, Daniel Bolojan, Donna Riedel, Benjamin Schmidt, Damian Witt, Denitsa Parleva, Risa Kagami
  • Area

    1850.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

AD Classics: 1988 Deconstructivist Exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

07:00 - 29 March, 2017
AD Classics: 1988 Deconstructivist Exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), View into the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA
View into the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA

When Philip Johnson curated the Museum of Modern Arts’ (MoMA) 1932 “International Exhibition of Modern Architecture,” he did so with the explicit intention of defining the International Style. As a guest curator at the same institution in 1988 alongside Mark Wigley (now Dean Emeritus of the Columbia GSAPP), Johnson took the opposite approach: rather than present architecture derived from a rigidly uniform set of design principles, he gathered a collection of work by architects whose similar (but not identical) approaches had yielded similar results. The designers he selected—Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, and the firm Coop Himmelblau (led by Wolf Prix)—would prove to be some of the most influential architects of the late 20th Century to the present day.[1,2]

Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA 1988 Catalogue Cover. Image via MoMA + 6

“Re-Constructivist Architecture” Exhibition Explores the Lost Art of Architectural Language

09:30 - 1 January, 2017
“Re-Constructivist Architecture” Exhibition Explores the Lost Art of Architectural Language, © jbmn
© jbmn

Re-Constructivist Architecture,” an exhibition now on show at the Ierimonti Gallery in New York, features the work of thirteen emerging architecture firms alongside the work of Coop Himmelb(l)au, Peter Eisenman and Bernard Tschumi. The title of the exhibition is a play on words, referring to the De-Constructivist exhibition of 1988 at the Museum of Modern Art that destabilized a certain kind of relationship with design theory.

This reconstruction is primarily of language. The architects draw from archives—mental, digital or printed on paper—distant from the typical parametric and highly schematic rationales that characterized the last thirty years of design in architecture. Within the theoretical system that drives architectural composition, these archives inevitably become homages, references, and quotes.

© AM3 © Adam Nathaniel Furman © Point Supreme © Warehouse of Architecture and Research + 46

Museum of Contemporary Art & Planning Exhibition / Coop Himmelb(l)au

08:30 - 28 November, 2016
Museum of Contemporary Art & Planning Exhibition / Coop Himmelb(l)au, © Duccio Malagamba
© Duccio Malagamba

© Duccio Malagamba © Duccio Malagamba © Duccio Malagamba © Duccio Malagamba + 33

  • Architects

  • Location

    Wen Hua Da Lou, ShangBu, Futian Qu, Shenzhen Shi, Guangdong Sheng, China
  • Design Principal

    Wolf D. Prix
  • Project Partner

    Markus Prossnigg
  • Design architects

    Quirin Krumbholz, Jörg Hugo, Mona Bayr
  • Project architects

    Angus Schoenberger, Veronika Janovska, Tyler Bornstein
  • Project coordination

    Xinyu Wan
  • Area

    80000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

European Central Bank / Coop Himmelb(l)au

12:00 - 11 November, 2016
European Central Bank / Coop Himmelb(l)au, © European Central Bank / Robert Metsch
© European Central Bank / Robert Metsch

© Paul Raftery © Robert Metsch © Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery + 21

Why Wolf Prix Is Pushing For New Methods of Robotic Construction

09:30 - 16 August, 2016
Why Wolf Prix Is Pushing For New Methods of Robotic Construction, View of "The Cloud" inside the Museum of Contemporary Art & Planning Exhibition in Shenzhen, China. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au
View of "The Cloud" inside the Museum of Contemporary Art & Planning Exhibition in Shenzhen, China. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Wolf Prix on Robotic Construction and the Safe Side of Adventurous Architecture."

In response to a conservative and sometimes fragmented building industry, some architects believe that improving and automating the construction process calls for a two-front war: first, using experimental materials and components, and second, assembling them in experimental ways. Extra-innovative examples include self-directed insect-like robots that huddle together to form the shape of a building and materials that snap into place in response to temperature or kinetic energy.

The automation battle has already been fought (and won) in other industries. With whirring gears and hissing pneumatics, rows and rows of Ford-ist mechanical robot arms make cars, aircraft, and submarines in a cascade of soldering sparks. So why shouldn’t robotic construction become commonplace for buildings, too?

Video: Musée des Confluences / Coop Himmelb(l)au

14:00 - 21 December, 2015

"If you only think in architectural terms, only architecture will come out." - Wolf Prix

Inspired by space suits, Formula One circuits, and many other "mind expanding machines," Wolf D. Prix of Coop Himmelb(l)au explains the thought process that went behind their design of the Musée des Confluences in Lyon, France. With spiraling ramps and bridges throughout, the museum allows visitors to explore the space "freely," despite the constraints of gravity, and, in a sense, "conquer space." Read on for Spirit of Space's full interview with Prix.

Alternative Realities: 7 Radical Buildings That Could-Have-Been

09:30 - 21 September, 2015
Alternative Realities: 7 Radical Buildings That Could-Have-Been, Masterplan for the World Trade Center by Richard Meier & Partners, Eisenman Architects, Gwathmey Siegel and Associates, and Steven Holl Architects. Image © Jock Pottle. Courtesy Richard Meier & Partners Architects
Masterplan for the World Trade Center by Richard Meier & Partners, Eisenman Architects, Gwathmey Siegel and Associates, and Steven Holl Architects. Image © Jock Pottle. Courtesy Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In It’s A Wonderful Life the film’s protagonist George Bailey, facing a crisis of faith, is visited by his guardian angel, and shown an alternate reality where he doesn’t exist. The experience gives meaning to George’s life, showing him his own importance to others. With the increasing scale of design competitions these days, architectural “could-have-beens” are piling up in record numbers, and just as George Bailey's sense of self was restored by seeing his alternate reality, hypothesizing about alternative outcomes in architecture is a chance to reflect on our current architectural moment.

Today marks the one-year-anniversary of the opening of Phase 3 of the High Line. While New Yorkers and urbanists the world over have lauded the success of this industrial-utility-turned-urban-oasis, the park and the slew of other urban improvements it has inspired almost happened very differently. Although we have come to know and love the High Line of Diller Scofidio + Renfro and James Corner Field Operations, in the original ideas competition four finalists were chosen and the alternatives show stark contrasts in how things might have shaped up.

On this key date for one of the most crucial designs of this generation, we decided to look back at some of the most important competitions of the last century to see how things might have been different.

Joseph Marzella's second-place design for the Sydney Opera House. Image via The Daily Mail Designs for the Chicago Tribune Tower by Adolf Loos (left) and Bruno Taut, Walter Gunther, and Kurz Schutz (right). Image via skyscraper.org Design for the High Line by Zaha Hadid Architects with Balmori Associates, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP and studio MDA. Image via University of Adelaide on Cargo Collective Moshe Safdie's design for the Centre Pompidou. Image Courtesy of Safdie Architects + 16

Video: House of Music / Coop Himmelb(l)au

12:35 - 2 June, 2015

One of the best acoustically responsive concert halls in the world, Coop Himmelb(l)au's House of Music in Aalborg has been a lively center for music and creative exchange since its opening in 2014. Based off of the simple, yet powerful courtyard typology and inspired by Le Corbusier’s La Tourette, the 1,300-seat concert hall is embraced by a U-shaped education center and enhanced by a careful overlapping of public and performance areas. This has allowed the building to live up to its name, becoming an animated House of Music where music is not only heard, but seen.

This video is the first of a series by Spirit of Space. You can watch Coop Himmelb(l)au's Wolf Prix talk about his intentions behind the House of Music, after the break.

Coop Himmelb(l)au’s Musée des Confluences Through the Lens of Edmund Sumner

15:00 - 5 March, 2015
© Edmund Sumner
© Edmund Sumner

Edmund Sumner has shared with us images from his recent visit to Lyon, France, where he photographed Coop Himmelb(l)au’s newly completed Musée des Confluences. Perched on a century-old artificial peninsula at the confluence of the Rhône and Saône rivers, the “museum of knowledge,” as Coop Himmelb(l)au affectionately refers to it, is distinct for its “iconic gateway” - an openly traversable “Crystal” that provides multi-level access to the museum’s exhibition spaces and views of the building's unique context. Step inside, after the break.

© Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner + 29

The Robot Revolution: Coop Himmelb(l)au Founder Wolf D. Prix on the Future of Construction

09:30 - 3 March, 2015

With a recently released animation entitled “We Start the Future of Construction,” Coop Himmelb(l)au announced their intention to take digital fabrication to a radical new scale, demonstrating how technology is impacting almost every aspect of the architectural profession. The advent of building information modeling and other modeling software has transformed how architects and engineers navigate the construction process, allowing us to achieve increasingly complex forms that can be modeled with the aid of CNC machining and 3D Printing, but still there remains a wide gap between the technologies available to architects and those employed by builders. When it comes to a building’s actual construction we have been limited by the great costs associated with non-standard components and labor - but now, the automated practices that transformed manufacturing industries could revolutionize how we make buildings.

Last week, ArchDaily sat down with co-founder, Design Principal and CEO of Coop Himmelb(l)au, Wolf D. Prix for his thoughts on the future of construction and the role of the architect in an increasingly technological practice. Read on after the break to find out how robots could impact architectural design, construction, and the future of the profession.

Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au Screenshot from Video. Image Courtesy of Coop Himmelb(l)au + 8

Musée des Confluences / Coop Himmelb(l)au

01:00 - 12 January, 2015
Musée des Confluences / Coop Himmelb(l)au, © Duccio Malagamba
© Duccio Malagamba

© Duccio Malagamba © Duccio Malagamba © Duccio Malagamba © Duccio Malagamba + 16

Coop Himmelb(l)au Designs Anti-Surveillance Coat

00:00 - 6 July, 2014
Coop Himmelb(l)au Designs Anti-Surveillance Coat, © Markus Pillhofer
© Markus Pillhofer

The Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au has designed a wacky quilted coat that blocks electronic surveillance. With pockets to protect your collection of phones and tablets, the Jammer Coat was commissioned for the Workwear exhibition at the Triennale in Milan.

House of Music / Coop Himmelb(l)au

01:00 - 14 April, 2014
House of Music / Coop Himmelb(l)au, © Martin Schubert
© Martin Schubert

© Martin Schubert © Martin Schubert Courtesy of COOP HIMMELB(L)AU © Rene Jeppesen + 28