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Construction: The Latest Architecture and News

Architecture and Climate: 6 Techniques for Emergency Shelters

According to data from CRED (Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters) and UNISDR (UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction), in a report released in 2016, the number of disasters related to the climate change has duplicated in the last forty years. The need for temporary shelters for homeless people is, as well as an effect of the climate crisis, is also one of the consequences of the disorderly growth of cities, which leads to a significant part of the world population living in vulnerable conditions due to disasters.

The Future of the Old: How Ancient Construction Techniques are Being Updated

While technology and construction have progressed rapidly in recent years, allowing structures to be built taller and faster than ever, remnants of colossal ancient monuments remind us that construction techniques from as long as hundreds of years ago had enormous merit as well. In fact, many of the innovations of antiquity serve as foundations of modern construction, with the Roman invention of concrete serving as a cogent example. Other essential ancient construction techniques, such as the arch and the dome, are now often considered stylistic flourishes, with designs like the Met Opera House reinterpreting classical typologies in a modern context. Yet perhaps the most relevant reinterpretations of ancient construction today are those that do so in the interest of sustainability, renouncing high-energy modern construction methods in favor of older, more natural techniques.

CTBUH 2020 Tall + Urban Innovation Conference

The annual Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat's (CTBUH) Tall + Urban Innovation Conference explores and celebrates the very best in innovative tall buildings, urban spaces, building technologies, and construction practices from around the world. Incorporating what was previously known as the CTBUH Annual Awards event, this conference sees the owner/developers, design, and engineer teams for 50+ Awarded projects present in front of an international audience and live juries for winning distinctions across several award categories. Hot topics in the building industry will also be explored through presentations in project rooms.

The event brings to Chicago, the home of CTBUH,

How Can We Make Data-driven Decisions to Reduce Whole Life Cost and Carbon?

As we embark on a new decade, discussions surrounding the sustainability and longevity of our buildings have reached fever pitch, particularly within the context of the UK’s commitment to a 2050 target of carbon neutrality and a 33% reduction in whole life cost by 2025.

Leading the way in innovative thinking is Cartwright Pickard, who alongside the Mackintosh School of Architecture have conducted research into new software that will greatly assist the government in achieving these essential targets.

The revolutionary technology will integrate advanced BIM (Building Information Modelling) with cloud-based whole life cost and carbon databases, enabling those commissioning and designing buildings

Layered Architecture: What is Additive Manufacturing?

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a term used to identify the manufacturing processes performed by 3D printing through layer-by-layer construction. In addition to avoiding the generation of waste through the use of precise geometries and exact quantities of material, these controlled processes can be much faster than traditional ones, since they don't require tools or other instruments.

Additive Manufacturing is done based on a digital model. The process begins with a CAD design or three-dimensional scan and then translates that shape into an object divided into sections, allowing it to be printed. Its use has extended from industrial design to the replica of archaeological objects to the manufacture of artificial human organs and tissues, among many others.

Advanced Construction: Material Innovations and New Technologies

Materials and technology come together in new spaces and experiences. When looking to innovations in advanced construction, the Institute for Computational Design (ICD) and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE), together with students at the University of Stuttgart, have been creating a series of experimental pavilion for many years. These structures tell a story of computational design and computer-aided manufacturing processes for advanced construction.

Courtesy of ICD-ITKE Courtesy of ICD-ITKE Courtesy of ICD-ITKE Courtesy of ICD-ITKE + 13

BuildTech Trends: Movements Shaping Architecture and Construction

As construction evolves, new advancements are shaping how we design. These movements are the product of shared ideas and the convergence of building technologies that open up new possibilities for architecture. From the atomic scale of materials to preassembled homes and faraway planets, the changes in BuildTech are felt across industries. As a result, disciplines are learning from one another to reimagine how we build.

Courtesy of AI SpaceFactory and Plomp © Kim Jong-Kwan Courtesy of AI SpaceFactory and Plomp Courtesy of DAQRI + 10

Human-Free Construction: How BuildTech’s Evolution Impacts Design

The construction industry has evolved throughout time, but always by way of builders. What happens when people are no longer part of building and construction? This is the question asked by British multinational infrastructure company Balfour Beatty, and they’ve published their answer in the 2050 Innovation Paper. The industry report has become a reference point to those looking at the evolution of buildings and design.

Courtesy of Foster + Partners Courtesy of Foster + Partners Courtesy of Sarcos Robotics Courtesy of ICON and New Story + 9

Gothic Construction Techniques Inspire ETH Zurich's Lightweight Concrete Floor Slabs

With the intention of maximizing available space and avoiding steep construction costs, researchers from ETH Zurich’s Department of Architecture have devised a concrete floor slab that with a thickness of a mere 2cm, remains load bearing and simultaneously sustainable. Inspired by the construction of Catalan vaults, this new floor system swaps reinforced steel bars for narrow vertical ribs, thus significantly reducing the weight of construction and ensuring stability to counter uneven distributions on its surface.

As opposed to traditional concrete floors that are evidently flat, these slabs are designed to arch to support major loads, reminiscent of the vaulted ceilings found in Gothic cathedrals. Without the need for steel reinforcing and with less concrete, the production of CO2 is minimized and the resulting 2cm floors are 70% lighter than their typical concrete counterparts.

via Block Research Group via Block Research Group via Block Research Group via Block Research Group + 5

Is Integrating Building Performance Difficult at Your Firm?

In a study recently published by AIA, less than 13% of architectural firms have incorporated building performance as part of their practice. With buildings contributing 40% of total carbon emissions leading to climate change, just 25 projects are roughly equivalent to planting 1 million trees each year. In addition to that, teams that are able to showcase data-driven and performance-driven decision-making and feature an energy analysis in every pursuit are able to increase fees and generate more revenue. Although integrating building performance sounds like a no-brainer, it proves to be difficult at many firms, because in addition to the practical changes, it requires a culture shift. That culture shift can only happen if the tools are easy to use, accurate, and mesh well with current workflows. Right now is the perfect time to tackle these culture changes due to a few reasons:

The Foolproof Way to Manage Revisions

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“Are you looking at the latest revision?”

This is just one of the many questions we architects frequently ask, and get asked. But how much easier it would be if there was a foolproof way to manage revisions and know that everyone else is on top of it too.

16 Brick Cladding Constructive Details

Traditionally, bricks have been used in architecture to fulfill a double function: structural and aesthetic. While they act as an effective and resistant modular solution in building structures, their faces can be exposed to constitute their architectural appearance, generating facades rich in texture and color, thanks to the iron present in the clay they are composed of.

At present, there are products that allow the attractive appearance of bricks to be merged with other structural systems, separating their functions and providing the necessary freedom of design so that the facades can adapt creatively in favor of the conditions of each project and the requirements of its users.

La Géode / ADHOC architectes. Image © Adrien Williams Four51 Marlborough / Hacin + Associates. Image © Trent Bell Photography Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building / Mecanoo + Sasaki Associates. Image Cortesía de Mecanoo Moody Center for the Arts / Michael Maltzan Architecture. Image © Nash Baker + 21

How to Streamline the Design Process

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You're an architect so you know organization is key. You think you’re on top of all the categories, rules and folders in Outlook that you've created to get by. You file away all of your emails by project and category, but time and again, your email search function fails you and finding any file is a nightmare.