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Call for Applications: Douglas A. Garofalo Fellowship 2019–20

12:44 - 11 December, 2018
Call for Applications: Douglas A. Garofalo Fellowship 2019–20, Fosco Lucarelli, Dysfunctional Plans, Garofalo Fellowship research exhibition, April 2018
Fosco Lucarelli, Dysfunctional Plans, Garofalo Fellowship research exhibition, April 2018

The University of Illinois at Chicago School of Architecture is now accepting applications for the 2019–20 Douglas A. Garofalo Fellowship. Named in honor of the architect and educator Doug Garofalo (1958–2011), this nine-month fellowship provides emerging designers the opportunity to teach studio and seminar courses and conduct independent research, culminating in a public lecture at the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and an exhibition at the school.

Now in its sixth year, the Garofalo Fellowship has made an essential contribution to the school’s culture through participants’ design and pedagogical agendas. Past fellows include Molly Hunker (SPORTS), Pier

Call for Entries: Disruptive Design - New Solutions to Affordable Housing

12:58 - 10 December, 2018
Call for Entries: Disruptive Design - New Solutions to Affordable Housing

Disruptive Design is a three-part design competition that seeks to address the challenges associated with designing and building affordable, owner-occupied housing.

Architects, designers, students, and those invested in urban development are invited to submit their speculative ideas for an owner-occupied housing development incorporating a flexible architectural solution that encourages wealth-building through homeownership and entrepreneurship. The competition will conclude with an occupant/buyer-ready prototype of the winning design.

THE CHALLENGE

The desire for affordable housing is present in both the gentrifying and underserved Chicago neighborhoods. In gentrifying areas, land values rise with desirability; in underserved areas, depreciated property and land values produce an appraisal

Sukhman Yagoda Law Offices / Vladimir Radutny Architects

19:00 - 30 November, 2018
Sukhman Yagoda Law Offices / Vladimir Radutny Architects, © Mike Schwartz Photography
© Mike Schwartz Photography

© Mike Schwartz Photography © Mike Schwartz Photography © Mike Schwartz Photography © Mike Schwartz Photography + 20

The Top Creative Cities and Countries of 2018 According to Airbnb

11:00 - 30 November, 2018
The Top Creative Cities and Countries of 2018 According to Airbnb, Tianjin Binhai Library / MVRDV + Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute. Image © Ossip Van Duivenbode
Tianjin Binhai Library / MVRDV + Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute. Image © Ossip Van Duivenbode

As 2018 draws to a close, accommodation website Airbnb has dived into their data to reveal the most creative cities and countries from the year. Based on the percentage of hosts who are in the creative industries, the list builds on a previous survey by Airbnb which found that one in 10 Airbnb hosts and one in three Experience hosts identify as members of the creative community.

Read on below for the list of top creative countries and cities according to the new Airbnb study. For architects already planning a New Year’s getaway, check out an article we published of ten projects previously featured by ArchDaily, now available for booking through Airbnb.

4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities

09:30 - 24 November, 2018
4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities, © DLR Group
© DLR Group

As architects face up to the need for ethical, sustainable design in the age of climate change awareness, timber architecture is making a comeback in a new, technologically impressive way. Largely overlooked in the age of Modernism, recent years have seen a plethora of advancements related to mass timber across the world. This year alone, Japan announced plans for a supertall wooden skyscraper in Tokyo by 2041, while the European continent has seen plans for the world’s largest timber building in the Netherlands, and the world’s tallest timber tower in Norway.

The potential for mass timber to become the dominant material of future sustainable cities has also gained traction in the United States throughout 2018. Evolving codes and the increasing availability of mass timber is inspiring firms, universities, and state legislators to research and invest in ambitious projects across the country.

Chicago Approves bKL Architecture’s Three-Tower Master Plan for Lakeshore East

08:00 - 11 November, 2018
Courtesy of bKL architecture
Courtesy of bKL architecture

Where the Chicago River meets Lake Michigan, a pivotal node in Chicago’s cityscape, bKL Architecture has designed three towers along the waterfront, which connect the natural elements of the landscape with the urban center and neighboring communities.

The urban development is located at a prominent junction utilized by both pedestrians and automobiles; the site’s new master plan separates the two, providing seamless integration between the active green space surrounding bLK’s three towers and the lakefront.

Wrightwood 659 Exhibition Space / Tadao Ando Architect and Associates

14:00 - 6 November, 2018
© Jeff Goldberg / Esto
© Jeff Goldberg / Esto

© Jeff Goldberg / Esto © Jeff Goldberg / Esto © Jeff Goldberg / Esto © Jeff Goldberg / Esto + 20

Illinois Launches Autonomous Vehicle Initiative to Research Self-Driving Cars

03:30 - 1 November, 2018
Illinois Launches Autonomous Vehicle Initiative to Research Self-Driving Cars, Chicago, Illinois. Image © Kristopher Kettner / Shutterstock
Chicago, Illinois. Image © Kristopher Kettner / Shutterstock

The state of Illinois has launched a new testing program for connected and automated vehicles. Called Autonomous Illinois, the research initiative was announced by Governor Bruce Rauner's office. As Curbed Chicago reports, Created by executive order, multiagency program will be state-wide and led by the Illinois Department of Transportation to advance the state’s research in self-driving cars.

Ross Barney Architects' CLT Design for McDonald's Expands the Possibilities of Timber Construction

06:00 - 28 October, 2018
© Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers
© Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers

In an effort to reinvent an iconic American fast-food brand, McDonald’s U.S. has announced a new direction for the corporation, beginning with rethinking the restaurant’s current archetypal design both in its interior eating spaces and exterior urban landscape. A primary example of this commitment can be seen in the recently completed design for McDonald’s Global Flagship in Chicago by Ross Barney Architects.

The structure, which fills an entire city block in the heart of Chicago, was envisioned as a hallmark example of both the architect and the corporation's shared commitment to environmentally sustainable design. Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), an essential material for the project, replaced many of the commonly-used building materials such as steel, concrete, and plastics that have a larger environmental footprint.

SOM Designs Kinematic Sculpture for Chicago Design Week

04:00 - 24 October, 2018
SOM Designs Kinematic Sculpture for Chicago Design Week, Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan
Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan

Architecture firm SOM has designed Kinematic Sculpture, an origami-like pavilion installation for Chicago Design Week. Exploring kinematics as the science of motion, the sculpture was formed as one of the firm's ongoing interdisciplinary research projects. As a test in integrated design, the structure aims to establish ideas that foster new architectural and structural solutions for pressing challenges in the built environment.

Kinematic Sculpture. Image © SOM Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan + 8

"I Prefer When Form Follows Force": an Interview with Helmut Jahn

09:30 - 10 October, 2018
"I Prefer When Form Follows Force": an Interview with Helmut Jahn , Courtesy of Helmut Jahn
Courtesy of Helmut Jahn

In the last few years something has happened to architects’ willingness to strive for originality. The boldest visions now often come from the old guard of architecture - and frankly, I enjoy conversations with them much more. The current insistence on having common ground pushed so many younger architects into a zombie-like copycat state of mind. But to me, common ground means not to think alike – then there is space for discourse.

My most recent conversation with Helmut Jahn at his Chicago office is a case in point. “Architecture is all about going with your gut. I prefer when form follows force rather than function,” he told me. His distinguished career has been one of twists and turns, and he is not planning to give up exploring new ideas any time soon. His 1985 quadrant-in-plan Thompson Center reinvented a mundane government typology into a soaring public place, with its curved colored glass facade decisively welcoming a postmodernist period to Chicago (one we thought had finished, but now seems to be ongoing, encompassing all of post-Modern movements as its mere shades and variations.) Jahn’s architecture shook and modernized a number of global cities, and with time and experience, what began as a rebellion against Mies’s “less is more” modus operandi matured into nuanced, measured, though unquestionably gutsy, production of towers, airports, convention centers, headquarters, and, most importantly, public spaces. As Jahn himself says, “...anything you don’t need is a benefit. Not only you have to have less things but with the things you have left you have to do more.”

Courtesy of Helmut Jahn Courtesy of Helmut Jahn Courtesy of Helmut Jahn Courtesy of Helmut Jahn + 27

AD Classics: World's Columbian Exposition / Daniel Burnham and Frederick Law Olmsted

16:30 - 9 October, 2018
AD Classics: World's Columbian Exposition / Daniel Burnham and Frederick Law Olmsted, Viewed from the far end of the Great Basin, the Administration Building looms over the court of honor and the surrounding great buildings of the fair. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain)
Viewed from the far end of the Great Basin, the Administration Building looms over the court of honor and the surrounding great buildings of the fair. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain)

The United States had made an admirable showing for itself at the very first World’s Fair, the Crystal Palace Exhibition, held in the United Kingdom in 1851. British newspapers were unreserved in their praise, declaring America’s displayed inventions to be more ingenious and useful than any others at the Fair; the Liverpool Times asserted “no longer to be ridiculed, much less despised.” Unlike various European governments, which spent lavishly on their national displays in the exhibitions that followed, the US Congress was hesitant to contribute funds, forcing exhibitors to rely on individuals for support. Interest in international exhibitions fell during the nation’s bloody Civil War; things recovered quickly enough in the wake of the conflict, however, that the country could host the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Celebrating both American patriotism and technological progress, the Centennial Exhibition was a resounding success which set the stage for another great American fair: the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893.[1]

Courtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain) Although the building itself was handsome, the exhibits of the United States Government Building failed to entice many of the fair’s visitors. In the foreground stands the Ho-O-Den, a replica medieval Japanese palace. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user scewing (Public Domain A map of the 1893 Exposition shows how much of the fair’s buildings were laid out on axis with the court of honor. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user scewing (Public Domain) + 16

AD Classics: Prentice Women's Hospital / Bertrand Goldberg

22:00 - 6 October, 2018
AD Classics: Prentice Women's Hospital / Bertrand Goldberg, Courtesy of Landmark Illinois
Courtesy of Landmark Illinois

This article was originally published on September 28, 2013. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Hospital buildings, with their high standards of hygiene and efficiency, are a restrictive brief for architects, who all too often end up designing uninspiring corridors of patient rooms constructed from a limited palette of materials. However, this was not the case in Bertrand Goldberg's 1975 Prentice Women's Hospital. The hospital is the best example of a series of Goldberg-designed medical facilities, which all adhere to a similar form: a tower containing rooms for patient care, placed atop a rectilinear plinth containing the hospital's other functions.

© C. William Brubaker via Flickr user UIC Digital Collections Courtesy of Landmark Illinois Courtesy of Landmark Illinois © Flickr user seanbirm + 7

Read on for more about this masterwork of humanist brutalism...

"I Want to Build Lighter": Francisco Gonzalez Pulido of FGP Atelier

09:30 - 2 October, 2018
"I Want to Build Lighter": Francisco Gonzalez Pulido of FGP Atelier, Harmony. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier
Harmony. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier

After graduating from Tecnológico de Monterrey, a leading technical school in Mexico, Francisco Gonzalez Pulido worked on design-build projects for six years before leaving for the US where he earned his Master’s degree from Harvard’s GSD in 1999. The same year the architect started working with Helmut Jahn in Chicago where he stayed for 18 years – from intern to becoming the president of the company in 2012, at which point he renamed the firm into Jahn. By then he developed his own body of work there. Last year Gonzalez Pulido started FGP Atelier in his adopted home city.

Today the studio, counts a dozen of architects and is overseeing the design of a couple of high-rises in China, a baseball stadium in Mexico City, and university buildings in Monterrey, among other projects. The following interview was conducted at FGP Atelier in Chicago, during which the architect was explicit about transmitting his view: “Architecture is too rigid, too formal. It is time to break free…I want to build lighter. I want to build smarter.”

ART. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier Tecnano. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier DIABLOS. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier Harmony. Image Courtesy of FGP Atelier + 41

McDonald's Chicago Flagship / Ross Barney Architects

18:00 - 29 September, 2018
McDonald's Chicago Flagship / Ross Barney Architects, © Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers
© Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers

© Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers © Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers © Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers © Kendall McCaugherty, Hall+Merrick Photographers + 25

McDonald’s Global HQ / Gensler + IA Interior Architects and O+A Studio

09:00 - 9 September, 2018
McDonald’s Global HQ / Gensler + IA Interior Architects and O+A Studio, © Garrett Rowland
© Garrett Rowland

© Garrett Rowland © Garrett Rowland © Garrett Rowland © Garrett Rowland + 10

Spotlight: Louis Sullivan

16:00 - 3 September, 2018
 © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagoarchitecturetoday/8400309871/'>Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. Image © Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0
© Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0. Image © Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known as Chicago's "Father of Skyscrapers," Louis Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) foreshadowed modernism with his famous phrase "form follows function." Sullivan was an architectural prodigy even as a young man, graduating high school and beginning his studies at MIT when he was just 16. After just a year of study he dropped out of MIT, and by the time he was just 24 he had joined forces with Dankmar Adler as a full partner of Adler and Sullivan.

The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York. Image © Jack E. Boucher (public domain) The Carson Pirie Scott Building in Chicago, Illinois. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/cjsmithphotography/8656829487'>Flickr user cjsmithphotography</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a> The Wainwright Building in St Louis, Missouri. Image © University of Missouri The Wainwright Building in St Louis, Missouri. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2010-07-04_1880x2820_stlouis_wainwright_building.jpg'>J. Crocker</a> + 8

The Chicago Architecture Center Opens in New Location

12:00 - 31 August, 2018
The Chicago Architecture Center Opens in New Location, Chicago Architecture Center. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Center
Chicago Architecture Center. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Center

After their previous announcement back in January, the Chicago Architecture Center (CAC) is officially open to the public this Friday, August 31st. Formerly known as the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the 20,000 square foot CAC opens in a new location at 111 East Wacker Drive. Featuring programs, exhibitions and tours, the center aims to be "home to everything architecture in Chicago." The CAC includes a range of custom designed spaces, from an architecture store and lecture hall to interactive exhibits.

Chicago Architecture Center. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Center Chicago Architecture Center. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Center Chicago Architecture Center. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Center Chicago Architecture Center. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Center + 7