Video: 7 Architects On What Makes Global Architecture Work

15:00 - 21 January, 2016

Doing architecture is listening. - Norman Foster

Peter Zumthor, Jean Nouvel, Norman Foster, Diébédo Francis Kéré and three other great architects come together in this Louisiana Channel video to share their thoughts on how to design for different cultures. For most of them, understanding context, collaborating with locals and using architecture to address larger social issues are what makes global architecture a success. 

Louis Becker, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen and Kunlé Adeyemi also share their insights in the video above - "Bridging Cultures in a Global World."

Architecture’s Most Inspiring Leaders, Projects & People in 2015

14:30 - 17 December, 2015
Architecture’s Most Inspiring Leaders, Projects & People in 2015

5,000 3D cameras to help preserve the architecture of a country torn by war; A team of Latin American architects that moved into Venezuela’s most dangerous neighborhoods in order to design and build with the community; A legendary architect who understood architecture’s relationship to the transformation of technology -- and whose projects have celebrated technology across a trajectory of multiple decades. These are the projects, initiatives and people who have proven to be leaders in 2015.

ArchDaily’s editorial team wanted to recognize these projects for their commitment to promoting practices in architecture that serve many, in all corners of the globe -- from Bolivia to London, from Chicago to Venice, from public spaces in favelas to projected drone-ports in Africa. These are the stories that have inspired us in 2015, and whose influence we hope to continue to see into 2016.

How Painter Ben Johnson Takes Architectural Representation to Incredible Levels of Realism

04:00 - 8 December, 2015
How Painter Ben Johnson Takes Architectural Representation to Incredible Levels of Realism, 'Approaching the Mirador' (2013, acrylic on canvas, 89 x 59in / 225 x 150cm). Image © Ben Johnson
'Approaching the Mirador' (2013, acrylic on canvas, 89 x 59in / 225 x 150cm). Image © Ben Johnson

Ben Johnson is a painter preoccupied by realism – especially when it comes to the two-dimensional representation of architectural space. A British artist practicing in London, Johnson has been working professionally since the mid-1960s. In that time his extensive œuvre has encompassed painted cityscapes and prints to depictions of rooms designed—among others—by Norman Foster, John Pawson, I. M. Pei, and David Chipperfield.

'Room of the Niobids II' (2011, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 99in / 180 x 252cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson 'Fatherland Room' (2014, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 93in / 180 x 237cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson 'Roman Room' (2014, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 93in / 180 x 237cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson 'Room of the Niobids' (2011, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 99in / 180 x 252cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson +19

Is "Advocacy" the Most Influential Instrument in the Architect's Toolbox?

04:00 - 24 November, 2015
Is "Advocacy" the Most Influential Instrument in the Architect's Toolbox?, Millau Viaduct, France / Foster + Partners. Image via Foster + Partners
Millau Viaduct, France / Foster + Partners. Image via Foster + Partners

If Lord Foster—perhaps one of the greatest architects of our time—feels as though he has "no power as an architect, none whatsoever," people tend to take notice. His support, thoughts and opinions, he tells The Observer's Rowan Moore, are his most influential tools: "advocacy, he says, is the only power an architect ever has." Their conversation, held ahead of the Urban Age Global Debates which are currently taking place in London, also touches upon the importance of infrastructure, the social role of the architect, and the growing—if not undervalued—urgency to readdress sustainability within the profession.

TED Talk: Norman Foster on Green Architecture

08:00 - 21 November, 2015

“As an architect you design for the present, with an awareness of the past, for a future which is essentially unknown. The green agenda is probably the most important agenda and issue of the day […] all the projects which have, in some way, been inspired by that agenda are about a celebratory lifestyle, in a way celebrating the places and spaces which determine the quality of life.”

Norman Foster on Urbanism, Emerging Economies and Airport Design

04:00 - 3 November, 2015

In an exclusive half-hour interview with Lord Norman FosterMonocle's editor-in-chief Tyler Brûlé discusses matters of urban planning and "big-thinking emerging economies" with "one of the world’s most innovative and revered architects." Foster, who turned eighty years of age this year, has been the recipient of some of the world's most prestigious architecture awards – from the Pritzker Prize, the Stirling Prize, the AIA Gold Medal and the Prince of Asturias Award (Spain). Over the years, Foster's practice have become world-renowned experts in high-density transit design (namely, airports) – a focus of Brûlé's questioning.

7 Buildings That Show Norman Foster's Architecture Has Always Been Ahead of the Curve

09:31 - 22 September, 2015
7 Buildings That Show Norman Foster's Architecture Has Always Been Ahead of the Curve, Aerial View of Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young
Aerial View of Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

If Norman Foster were a household item, he would surely be a Swiss Army Knife. Foster, who turned 80 this year, is unrelenting in producing architectural solutions to problems that other architects can only theorize - just last Wednesday, for example, his firm released their design for a previously-unheard-of building typology, a droneport in Rwanda.

It is surprising then to find the man or his eponymous firm Foster + Partners absent from a list like Fast Company’s “The World's Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Architecture,” organized into superlatives: MMA Architects, “for thinking outside the big box,” Heatherwick Studio, “for reimagining green space,” or C.F. Møller Architects, “for rethinking high-rise living.” This is not to say that Foster or his firm should be substituted for any of these deserved accolades, but rather that for five decades Foster and his firm have ceaselessly worked to enhance and expand on the human experience with architectural solutions that are both inventive and practical - a fact that is perhaps lost as a result of his position within the architectural establishment.

With that in mind, we thought it was worth highlighting the many occasions over the decades where Foster + Partners has shown themselves to be among the world's most innovative practices. Read on for more.

Ground Level View of Lunar Habitation. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners Interior Concourse of Chek Lap Kok Airport. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC user Jorge Láscar Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Aerial View of Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters. Image © Wikimedia CC user Mato zilincik +14

Norman Foster Honored with Louis Kahn Memorial Award

07:00 - 12 June, 2015
Norman Foster Honored with Louis Kahn Memorial Award, Philadelphia skyline featuring 1,121-Foot Comcast Tower (rendering). Image © dbox, Foster + Partners
Philadelphia skyline featuring 1,121-Foot Comcast Tower (rendering). Image © dbox, Foster + Partners

Norman Foster has been awarded the Louis Kahn Memorial Award, an annual award that was established in 1983 to recognize "excellence in architecture" in honor of one of Philadelphia’s most influential architects.

"I am deeply honored to receive this award, particularly as I studied for my master’s degree at Kahn’s Yale University Art Gallery in 1961," said Foster. "I have been hugely influenced by his work, which is still as fresh today as it was then. I was privileged to meet Louis Kahn at the University of Pennsylvania School of Architecture and to later teach there.”

7 Leading Architects Defend the World's Most Hated Buildings

12:38 - 5 June, 2015
7 Leading Architects Defend the World's Most Hated Buildings, Vele di Scampia. Image © Nick Hannes/Hollandse Hoogte/Redux
Vele di Scampia. Image © Nick Hannes/Hollandse Hoogte/Redux

From Paris' most abhorred tower to New York's controversial government center, seven renowned architects have stepped up in defense of the world's most hated buildings in a newly published article on T Magazine. As told to Alexandra Lange, the article presents direct quotes from Zaha Hadid, Daniel Libeskind, Norman Foster and four others regarding controversial architecture whose importance goes beyond aesthetics.

See what hated building Norman Foster believes to be a "heroic" structure, after the break. 

Norman Foster: Striving for Simplicity

14:35 - 1 June, 2015

“Quality is an attitude of mind.” - Norman Foster

In honor of Norman Foster's 80th birthday, we bring to you this extensive video interview by Louisiana Channel that gives an in-depth look into the life and career of the prolific English architect. Throughout the 40-minute interview, Foster reflects on his childhood obsession with technology, the evolution of his work, and his constant "strive for simplicity." 

Norman Foster’s Advice for the Young: “Find Something You Believe In”

17:10 - 6 May, 2015

Unless architecture is truly your passion, Norman Foster thinks you should simply find something else to pursue. In the Louisiana Channel's latest, the prolific English architect advises the young to live "every living second of your life" doing what you love. 

Norman Foster's Manchester Maggie's Centre Breaks Ground

05:00 - 22 April, 2015
Norman Foster's Manchester Maggie's Centre Breaks Ground, © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

After being granted planning permission last yearNorman Foster's new Maggie’s Cancer Centre in his hometown of  has broken ground. The project is being built at The Christie, one of Europe’s leading cancer centres and the largest single-site centre in Europe. According to Foster + Partners, the new centre will "provide free practical, emotional and social support for anyone living with cancer as well as their family and friends." Surrounded by the Centre’s existing, lush gardens designed by Dan Pearson, Foster’s proposed structure aims to tap into the therapeutic qualities of nature by engaging the outdoors.

Norman Foster Revisits New York's Hearst Tower With Drones

00:00 - 16 January, 2015

To mark the 10th anniversary of the topping out of New York City's Hearst TowerLord Foster returned in order to narrate a short film shedding new light on the building with the aid of camera drones. The 46 storey building - which is integrated into a 6 storey base brick structure designed by Joseph Urban in 1928 - was "one of the most sustainable buildings of its time." Now, ten years later, this footage captures spectacular new views of the main atrium.

Call For Entries: RIBA Norman Foster Travelling Scholarship 2015

01:00 - 12 January, 2015
Call For Entries: RIBA Norman Foster Travelling Scholarship 2015, Call For Entries: 2015. Image Courtesy of RIBA
Call For Entries: 2015. Image Courtesy of RIBA

The 2015 RIBA Norman Foster Travelling Scholarship has launched and is inviting applications from schools of architecture around the world. A £6,000 grant will be awarded to one student by a panel of judges which will include Lord Foster and the current President of the , Stephen Hodder. First established in 2006, the scholarship is now in its eighth year and is designed to fund international research on a topic related to the survival of our towns and cities in a location of the student’s choice.

Norman Foster's Interview with The European: “Architecture is the Expression of Values”

01:00 - 31 October, 2014
Norman Foster's Interview with The European: “Architecture is the Expression of Values”, Apple Campus 2 / Foster + Partners. Image © City of Cupertino
Apple Campus 2 / Foster + Partners. Image © City of Cupertino

Berlin-based editor Max Tholl of The European Magazine has shared with us his interview with Norman Foster on the role of architecture in today’s society. 

The European: Lord Foster, architects design buildings that will characterize cities for decades or even centuries to come. How difficult is it to design buildings for an unknown future?

Foster: Flexibility is a key consideration. We design with an awareness that circumstances will change – that a building’s context will evolve; it may be used in different ways and will need to incorporate new technologies that we cannot yet predict.

The complete interview, after the break. 

Ten Top Designers Get the Products of Their Dreams With "The Wish List"

01:00 - 19 September, 2014
Ten Top Designers Get the Products of Their Dreams With "The Wish List", Tableware / Zaha Hadid + Gareth Neal. Image © Petr Krejčí
Tableware / Zaha Hadid + Gareth Neal. Image © Petr Krejčí

Terence Conran asked nine of his friends in the design world "What have you always wanted in your home, but have never been able to find?" The result is The Wish List, a set of ten projects dreamed up by big name designers such as Norman Foster, Zaha Hadid and Richard Rogers, but designed and crafted in collaboration with emerging designers.

Sponsored by the American Hardwood Export Council, the only restriction was that the product had to be made of wood, leading to designs ranging from Foster's modest geometric pencil sharpeners to Paul Smith's dream garden shed.

As part of the 2014 London Design Festival, the resulting ten products will be on show at the V&A Museum until October 24th.

Pencil Sharpener / Norman Foster + Norie Matsumoto. Image © Petr Krejčí Workspace / Terence Conran + Sebastian Cox. Image © Petr Krejčí Ladder / Richard Rogers, Ab Rogers + Xenia Moseley. Image © Petr Krejčí Shed / Paul Smith + Nathalie de Leval. Image © Petr Krejčí +21

New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport

00:00 - 4 September, 2014

Yesterday, a consortium led by Foster + Partners and Fernando Romero of FR-EE were announced as the winners of the competition for the design of Mexico City's new international airport. Designed in conjunction with a masterplan developed by Arup, the airport will initially include three runways, but is designed to expand to up to six runways by 2062, all served by the single terminal building.

One of the world's largest airport terminals at 555,000 square meters, the building is enclosed by a single, continuous lightweight gridshell, the largest of this type of structure ever built with spans reaching up to 170 meters.

By utilizing a single airport terminal, passengers will not need to travel on internal train services or underground tunnels, and the design of the building ensures shorter walking distances and few changes of level, all making for a more relaxing experience for users.

The building is designed to be the world's most sustainable airport, with the single lightweight shell using far less material than a cluster of buildings, and cooling and ventilation strategies that require little to no mechanical assistance for most of the year.

New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport

00:00 - 4 September, 2014
New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport, Image Captured from video via Foster + Partners
Image Captured from video via Foster + Partners

Yesterday, a consortium led by Foster + Partners and Fernando Romero of FR-EE were announced as the winners of the competition for the design of Mexico City's new international airport. Designed in conjunction with a masterplan developed by Arup, the airport will initially include three runways, but is designed to expand to up to six runways by 2062, all served by the single terminal building.

One of the world's largest airport terminals at 555,000 square meters, the building is enclosed by a single, continuous lightweight gridshell, the largest of this type of structure ever built with spans reaching up to 170 meters. By utilizing a single airport terminal, passengers will not need to travel on internal train services or underground tunnels, and the design of the building ensures shorter walking distances and few changes of level, all making for a more relaxing experience for users.

The building is designed to be the world's most sustainable airport, with the single lightweight shell using far less material than a cluster of buildings, and cooling and ventilation strategies that require little to no mechanical assistance for most of the year.

More details of the design after the break