All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Manchester

Manchester: The Latest Architecture and News

Mecanoo’s New KAMPUS Neighborhood Currently Under Construction in Manchester

Dutch design practice Mecanoo has designed a new neighborhood currently under construction in Manchester. Called KAMPUS, the developed is located at the former Manchester Metropolitan University campus in the heart of the city. As a melting pot of buildings and spaces, KAMPUS was made to celebrate the vibrancy and diversity of the city with respect to the historic quality of Canal Street.

Courtesy of Uniform Courtesy of Uniform Courtesy of Uniform Courtesy of Uniform + 11

Hardman Square Pavilion / Sheppard Robson

© Felix Mooneeram
© Felix Mooneeram

© Felix Mooneeram © Felix Mooneeram © Felix Mooneeram © Felix Mooneeram + 42

Pavillion  · 
Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project Sheppard Robson
  • Area Area of this architecture project
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2018

Whitworth Manchester / Grzywinski+Pons

© Nicholas Worley © Nicholas Worley © Nicholas Worley © Nicholas Worley + 57

Hotels  · 
Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project Grzywinski+Pons
  • Area Area of this architecture project
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2018

Brutal Britain: Build Your Own Brutalist Great Britain

High-rise tower blocks, prefab panel housing estates, streets in the sky, new towns; some of the concrete constructions that once shaped the cityscapes of post-war Britain have stood the test of time, while others are long gone.

‘Brutal Britain’ by Zupagrafika (also author of ‘Brutal London’) celebrates the brutalist architecture of the British Isles, inviting readers to explore the Modern past of Great Britain and rebuild some of its most intriguing post-war edifices, from the iconic slabs of Sheffield`s Park Hill and experimental tower blocks at Cotton Gardens in London, to the demolished Birmingham Central Library.

Opening with a foreword by architectural

What 6 British Cities Could Have Looked Like

A historic hotbed of architectural styles and a current architectural capital of the world, cities in the United Kingdom are awash with iconic buildings from the Georgian, Neoclassical, and contemporary era. Such buildings, from the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol to the Southbank in London, have come to define the cities in which they stand, drawing the eyes of tourists and designers alike from around the world.

It is therefore an interesting exercise to examine what these cities would look like if such structures didn’t exist. To this end, Neomam Studios has partnered with QuickQuid to produce a series of images demonstrating what six British cities could have looked like, resurrecting some of Britain’s most surprising unbuilt structures.

Glenn Howells Unveils 55-story Red Brick Tower in Manchester

Housing developer Student Castle has partnered with Glenn Howells Architects to create a 55-story red brick tower in Manchester city center. Built to include 850 rooms and co-working space for students and start-up businesses, the new skyscraper would overlook Oxford Road station next to Great Marlborough Street tower. Glenn Howells says the scheme pays homage to the red brick chimneys that once dominated the city’s skyline.

Carbuncle Cup 2018: The Shortlist for the UK's Most "Aesthetically Challenged" New Building

They say that bad publicity is good publicity. Nevertheless, late August is a time for baited breath among UK architects, as the readers of Building Design generate the shortlist for Britain’s "ugliest" building. Beauty is certainly in the eye of the beholder and judgment towards these unpopular designs shouldn't necessarily be generalized. However, this competition opens up important dialogues about architectural aesthetics and public reception of new projects.

Continuing the 12-year tradition of what has been called the RIBA Stirling Prize’s less fortunate sibling, the shortlist for the 2018 Carbuncle Cup showcases the six projects which British architecture followers love to hate. Previous winners of the prize include the Cutty Sark by Grimshaw in 2012, and Rafael Viñoly Architects' 20 Fenchurch Street in 2015.

Bright Building Manchester / BDP

Courtesy of BDP Courtesy of BDP Courtesy of BDP Courtesy of BDP + 24

Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project BDP
  • Area Area of this architecture project
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

OMA's £110 million Arts Center in Manchester Receives Planning Approval

OMA’s first major public building in the UK has been granted planning approval. Known as “Factory,” the groundbreaking new cultural center will serve as a the new home of the Manchester International Festival (MIF) and as a year-round concert and arts venue.

Courtesy of Factory Manchester Courtesy of Factory Manchester Courtesy of Factory Manchester Courtesy of Factory Manchester + 9

Tadao Ando's Only UK Project to be Demolished

Tadao Ando’s only project in the United Kingdom, the ‘Japanese Pavilion’ at Piccadilly Gardens in Manchester, is slated for demolition as part of a £10m redesign of the park and plaza.

Built in 2002 as part of a makeover for the square, the pavilion takes the form of a long, gray concrete wall along the park’s southwestern edge, which critics have argued divide the public space, describing the design as “bleak and depressing” and comparing it to the Berlin Wall.

Mecanoo's Design for the University of Manchester's Engineering Campus Eyes the Future

The University of Manchester’s Mecanoo-designed engineering campus has received planning permission from the Manchester City Council, greenlighting the £350 million project. The Manchester Engineering Campus Development is part of the University’s campus masterplan, meant to bring together a multidisciplinary engineering and scientific community and to consolidate the University’s campus around Oxford Road. The project is one of the largest single construction projects ever undertaken by an institution of higher education in the United Kingdom. MEC Hall, the main building of Mecanoo’s development, is 195 meters long.

Courtesy of Mecanoo Courtesy of Mecanoo Courtesy of Mecanoo Courtesy of Mecanoo + 9

Maggie's Cancer Centre Manchester / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 58

  • Architects Authors of this architecture project Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2016

In Residence: Ian Simpson in Manchester's Beetham Tower

In the latest installation of NOWNESS’ In Residence series, British architect Ian Simpson describes how was told by his careers teacher "not to set [his] sights too high" when he decided that he wanted to become an Architect. Here, he discusses the design intentions behind his home – the tallest residence in the United Kingdom's second city: Manchester. For Simpson, "home is [only] forty seconds away by lift."

© Nowness © Nowness © Nowness © Nowness + 7

Hello Wood Creates Three Christmas Trees in Budapest, London and Manchester

For the third consecutive year, Hello Wood—an international educational platform of design and architecture based in Hungary—have "rethought the Christmas Tree." Their three festive installations, in London, Manchester and Budapest, have been designed to live beyond the holiday season and will be recycled into new structures to help different causes in the New Year. "The role of architecture has changed a lot in the last few years," says Peter Pozsar, co-founder of Hello Wood. "Hello Wood represents this socially responsive architecture."

View the three projects after the break.

On OMA's Designs for 'The Factory': "an Enigmatic Tent Bulging With Programming"

In an article for the Financial Times, Edwin Heathcote responds to the recent news that OMA, based in Rotterdam, have won the competition to design the British city of Manchester's new "ultra-flexible" arts venue. The Factory, so-named because of city's rich musical heritage, will be one of the largest cultural projects of its kind. Having gained and maintained financial support from Westminster, the building—which must be able to transform from a 2,200-seat theatre into an open 5,000-capacity space—is a flagship project for the British government.

OMA Selected to Design Manchester's 'Factory', Their First Public Project in the UK

Rotterdam-based Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) have been announced by the UK's Chancellor of the Exchequer as the winning team in the competition to design the city of Manchester's high-profile Factory art space. Following the announcement of the shortlist earlier this year, featuring practices including Rafael Viñoly, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Zaha Hadid and Mecanoo, it has since been reported by The Guardian that the British government's original pledge of £78million ($117million) to the cost of the building will be raised by a further £9million per year from around 2018.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Records Optimistic Prospects

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)’s Future Trends Survey for September 2015 shows a level of consistency with the workload index remaining unchanged at a balance figure of +21. All nations and regions within the United Kingdom returned positive balance figures, with practices in Scotland responding most confidently about workloads in the next quarter. The report states that practices remain firmly positive about overall workload prospects in the medium term, though with "an apparent leveling-off in the rate of growth."

OMA, Zaha Hadid and Mecanoo Among 9 Shortlisted for New Art Space in Manchester

A competitive shortlist of 9 has been released for a new high-profile art space planned in Manchester. The £110 million project, known as "The Factory" (after the city's influential Factory Records), will feature an "ultra-flexible" arts venue that can transform from a 2,200-seat theater into an open 5,000-capacity space that will accommodate a wide range of art forms and performances. It will also serve as the new home of the Manchester International Festival (MIF).

"The level of international interest reflects the city’s emerging status as an internationally-renowned city of culture. This is a landmark development that will place Manchester in the highest tier of arts worldwide," said Manchester City Council (MCC) executive member Rosa Battle.

The 9 shortlisted practices are: