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UK: The Latest Architecture and News

Herzog & de Meuron Reveals Plans to Upgrade London's Liverpool Street Station

Architecture office Herzog & de Meuron has unveiled plans to revamp the Liverpool Street station in London. The scheme includes “vital upgrades” aimed at transforming the Victorian-era station into a fully accessible transportation hub fit to accommodate the 135 million people using the station annually. It also includes the addition of 840,000 square meters of offices and a 190,000 square feet hotel in two new structures, 10 and 6 stories high, respectively. These new interventions have attracted criticism from conservation groups. The proposal is currently undergoing its first round of public consultation. The development is overseen by Stellar, working with MTR, the operator of rail transport services and Network Rail.

Foster + Partners Unveils Design for The William, One of London’s Largest Timber Developments

Foster + Partners has revealed the design for a new mixed-use development in the northern end of the central London high street. The building is located on Queensway, opposite the Whitley, the famous department store, which is also being transformed by Foster + Partners as part of a larger redevelopment scheme. Named The William, after William Whiteley, the eponymous founder of the famous Whiteleys, the project includes six floors of office space, shops, and 32 new homes, 11 of which will be affordable.

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Lina Ghotmeh Selected as Designer of the 2023 Serpentine Pavilion, with a Proposal Aiming for the Smallest Possible Carbon Footprint

Beirut-born, Paris-based architect Lina Ghotmeh has been announced as the designer of the 22nd annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion. Titled “À Table,” the French expression for sitting together to eat, her proposal introduces a slender wooden structure with nine pleated petals supported by radial ribs. Inside the pavilion, a ring of tables and benches invites visitors to enter, sit down and relax, eat or work together. According to the architect, the modest space and low-slung canopy is meant to make people feel close to the earth. The Serpentine Pavilion will be open from June to October 2023.

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A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interior Design Projects Submitted to ArchDaily

Architects play an important role in creating healthy, functional and aesthetically pleasing environments. Interior design represents a natural continuation of the same prerogative, and its importance has been accentuated in recent years, from the lockdown forcing many people to remain indoors for extended periods of time, to the rise of remote work. The task of the interior designer is not decorating spaces, but planning for an effective use of space, understanding the needs of the user and highlighting the intrinsic qualities of a space. Acoustics, lighting, material properties and proportions all play a role in achieving a coherent and enjoyable interior space.

This week’s curated selection of Best Unbuilt Architecture highlights interior design projects submitted by the ArchDaily community. From a pastel-colored library in Turkey to a renovated symphony hall in San Diego, US, this selection of unbuilt projects showcases how architects design interior spaces by integrating textures, materials, light, and color in well-proportioned spaces. The article includes projects from Turkey, US, Switzerland, Indonesia, UK, and Denmark.

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Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism

Selldorf Architects have released a revised version of the plans to remodel the National Gallery and the Sainsbury Wing, both classified as Grade-I-listed monuments. Sainsbury Wing is also the recipient of the 2019 AIA Twenty-five Year Award. The plans for the Sainsbury Wing, designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown and opened in 1991, have faced intense criticism, with former RIBA Journal editor Hugh Pearman calling the remodeling plans “unnecessarily destructive”. The plans to remodel were first revealed earlier this year as part of the NG200 Project to celebrate the National Gallery’s bicentennial in 2024. The project proposes the remodeling of the Sainsbury Wing’s front gates, ground-floor entrance sequence, lobby, and first-floor spaces.

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Installations at the 2022 London Design Festival Explore Materiality, Movement and Light

The London Design Festival is an annual event that brings together designers, practitioners, retailers, and educators from across the globe. This year’s program of events, exhibitions, and installations invites creative leaders to exchange ideas and solutions for some of the most pressing issues of our time, like climate change, pollution, and resource depletion. The festival includes the Landmarks Projects. As part of this initiative, Rotterdam-based designer Sabine Marcelis has created “Swivel”, an outdoor installation in central London. Other installations like Sony Design’s “Into Sight” pavilion or Sou Fujimoto’s “Medusa” exhibition explore visual and sensorial effects through physical and virtual mediums.

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Muyiwa Oki Elected as RIBA President

Muyiwa Oki has been elected as the next President of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), one of the highest positions in UK architecture. As RIBA's first Black President, Muyiwa Oki will take over the two-year presidential term from Simon Alfred starting on 1 September 2023.

RIBA Announces the 2022 National Award Winners Showcasing UK’s Best New Architecture

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the 29 winners of the 2022 RIBA National Awards for architecture. Ranging from net-zero carbon office buildings to family homes, schools and education facilities, urban developments and cultural buildings, this year’s projects provide an insight into the key trends that shape UK’s architectural and economic environment. Many projects focused on uniting communities, by creating spaces as a result of a collaboration between the local residents and the architects, or by offering unique venues for musical or cultural events. The future of housing was also addressed, with projects illustrating a vision for modern rural living or creating new city blocks centered around community gardens. Another area of interest was the restoration and adaptation of existing buildings, be it a 900-year-old former dining hall of the Cathedral or an iconic 1950s Modernist house.

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Ecological Control and the Garden City: Utopia for Whom?

At the turn of the 19th century, a British publishing house would release a book written by an English urban planner – a book with an optimistic title. The title of this book was To-morrow: A Peaceful Path to Real Reform, later reprinted as Garden Cities of To-morrow. The English urban planner in question was Ebenezer Howard – and this book would lay the foundations for what would later become known as the Garden City Movement. This movement would go on to produce green suburbs praised for their lofty aims, but it would also produce satellite communities that only catered to a privileged few.

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RIBA Reveals 22 Projects Shortlisted for the 2022 RIBA East Architecture Awards

RIBA Reveals 22 Projects Shortlisted for the 2022 RIBA East Architecture Awards - Featured Image
Friars, St Ives by Mole Architects. Image © David Butler

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the shortlisted projects for the 2022 RIBA East architecture awards. The list of 22 buildings includes projects ranging from a small copper-clad home extension in Cambridge to a new youth and participation space at the Wolsey Theatre. All designs will be assessed by a regional jury, and the winning projects will be announced later this spring. Subsequently, Regional Award winners will be considered for the RIBA National Award.

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Heatherwick Studio Reveals Plans for the Redesign of Nottingham City Centre

Heatherick Studio has revealed the redevelopment plan for Nottingham city centre, a vision that establishes a new green core, reshapes the former shopping centre at the heart of the site, and highlights the area’s touristic potential. Centred around an ample new green area enabling citizens to connect with nature, the project proposes new social spaces, commercial, mixed-use and residential buildings while establishing street connections around the city centre. The initiative represents an expansive vision for redefining the city centre and its programming amidst the evolution of retail towards online shopping and in response to the impact of the pandemic.

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Foster + Partners' Tulip Tower Gets Rejected by UK Government

Foster + Partners' Tulip Tower Gets Rejected by UK Government - Featured Image
© DBOX

The UK government announced yesterday that planning approval will not be granted for Foster+Partners' Tulip tower. The decision letter published on behalf of the UK's housing secretary cites concerns over the design's embodied carbon and the possible negative impact on the surrounding architectural heritage. First revealed in 2018, the 305-metre tower would have become the tallest building in London's financial district.

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UK Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai is a Stage for AI-Generated Collective Poems

UK Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai is a Stage for AI-Generated Collective Poems - Featured Image
© Alin Constantin Photography

UK’s contribution to Expo 2020 Dubai is a wooden sculptural structure that celebrates cultural diversity and collaboration, highlighting Britain as a meeting place of cultures and ideas. Created by artist and designer Es Devlin, the Poem Pavilion uses advanced machine learning algorithms to transform the input of visitors into collective poems. The latter can be read in illuminating displays on the façade, transforming the pavilion into the exhibit itself.

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From Open Methods to Fostering Dialogue: 5 Emerging Practices in Europe

Five emerging architecture studio profiles from Switzerland, France, the Netherlands, Austria, the UK, and Slovakia have been chosen by New Generations, a European platform that analyses the most innovative emerging practices at the European level, providing a new space for the exchange of knowledge and confrontation, theory, and production. Since 2013, New Generations has involved more than 300 practices in a diverse program of cultural activities, such as festivals, exhibitions, open calls, video interviews, workshops, and experimental formats.