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Serpentine Pavilion

15 Projects in Mexico that Merge the Interior with the Exterior

08:00 - 14 September, 2018
15 Projects in Mexico that Merge the Interior with the Exterior, Casa CSF / López Duplan Arquitectos. Image © Héctor Armando Herrera
Casa CSF / López Duplan Arquitectos. Image © Héctor Armando Herrera

Casa CSF / López Duplan Arquitectos. Image © Héctor Armando Herrera Casa Estudio Hill / CCA Centro de Colaboración Arquitectónica. Image © Onnis Luque L House / Dellekamp Arquitectos. Image © Sandra Pereznieto Casa Bruma / Fernanda Canales. Image © Rafael Gamo + 20

One of the most important factors to consider when designing is the climate of the site. This can create difficulties when it comes to extreme climates and it is necessary to use insulation materials that adapt to changing conditions. However, when discussing Mexico and its specific climate, this can be an opportunity for architects to create microclimates and spaces that blur the transition of interiors and exteriors.

Patios have become a traditional element of design. They create interesting psychological effects that fuse the conception of the interior and exterior, the common and private. It is a way to bring sunlight and rain into the house, to open up paths and coexistences that do not occur in interiors. Below, a selection of projects in Mexico that use the patio as the main design resource.

10 Must-See Buildings to Discover at Open House London 2018

08:00 - 22 August, 2018
10 Must-See Buildings to Discover at Open House London 2018, Maggie's Centre Barts. Image © Iwan Baan
Maggie's Centre Barts. Image © Iwan Baan

Open House London 2018 has officially released the list of over 800 buildings open to the public this September. Now in its 27th edition, the weekend-long festival offers free guided tours and open doors to buildings and architecture across the city. This year, a range of exciting architecture will be featured, including the new US Embassy by KieranTimberlake, Maggie's Barts by Steven Holl Architects, and Bloomberg European Headquarters by Foster + Partners, the world's most sustainable office building. Find out our list of the top 10 must-see buildings to discover at this year's Open House.

Royal Academy of Music - Theatre and new Recital Hall. Image Courtesy of London Open House 2018 The Shard. Image Courtesy of London Open House 2018 Bloomberg European Headquarters. Image Courtesy of London Open House 2018 Bloomberg European Headquarters. Image Courtesy of London Open House 2018 + 26

BIG's Relocated Serpentine Pavilion Nears Completion in Toronto as Landmark Tower Tops Out in Vancouver

12:00 - 3 August, 2018
BIG's Relocated Serpentine Pavilion Nears Completion in Toronto as Landmark Tower Tops Out in Vancouver, Unzipped Toronto. Image Courtesy of Westbank
Unzipped Toronto. Image Courtesy of Westbank

The collaboration of Bjarke Ingels Group and Westbank are celebrating two milestones in Canada, as the topping out of their innovative Vancouver House coincides with the advanced construction of their relocated Serpentine Pavilion in Toronto.

The two BIG-designed structures, located on opposite coasts, have both been recognized for their architectural innovation. The LEED-Platinum Vancouver House was awarded the World Architecture Festival’s Future Building of the Year in 2015, while the “unzipped wall” is the first Serpentine Pavilion to embark on a multi-city tour of this kind, before ultimately landing in a permanent home on the Vancouver waterfront.

Vancouver House. Image Courtesy of Westbank Vancouver House. Image Courtesy of Westbank Unzipped Toronto. Image Courtesy of Westbank Unzipped Toronto. Image Courtesy of Westbank + 9

Plaza Artz Pedregal Building by Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Collapses in Mexico City

13:40 - 12 July, 2018

Videos circulating around social media show at least a partial collapse of Plaza Artz Pedegral, a project built in 2012 by the Mexican architecture office Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos. At the time of reporting the cause of the collapse has not yet been confirmed.

According to the online version of the Milenio newspaper, The Secretary of Civil Protection (secretario de Protección Civil) in Mexico City stated that, at the moment, there are no reports of people injured or trapped.

Video from 2016 shows part of the site collapsing around the roads adjoining the site.

Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

14:00 - 13 June, 2018
Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Following the opening of the 2018 Serpentine Pavillion this week, designed by Mexican architect Frida Escobedo, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Ghinitoiu’s images, which you can discover below, capture the elemental beauty of Escobedo’s pavilion, defined by a permeable cement tile façade inspired by Mexican celosias.

Fusing elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, the pavilion centers on a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed using the characteristic celosia method.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

Frida Escobedo on the 2018 Serpentine Pavilion: "Mexican Architecture Is an Architecture of Layering"

12:30 - 12 June, 2018

After Frida Escobedo, Yana Peel and Hans Ulrich Obrist officially presented the 2018 Serpentine Pavilion on Monday, June 11 at Kensington Gardens in London, we had the opportunity to interview Mexican architect Frida Escobedo exclusively for ArchDaily. Escobedo shared with us with us the importance that designing pavilions has had in her career, the relevance of working on public spaces, and offered her thoughts on the perception of the Mexican context outside of Mexico. She also spoke further about the details of the pavilion itself and revealed where she would like the pavilion to be moved after completing its 4-month stay at Kensington Gardens.

The 2018 Serpentine Pavilion opens to the public on June 15th and will remain in place until October 7th, 2018.

Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London

09:35 - 11 June, 2018
Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The 2018 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, designed by Frida Escobedo, was unveiled today in London's Hyde Park. Escobedo's design, which fuses elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, features a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed from cement roof tiles. These tiles are stacked to form a celosia, a type of wall common to Mexican architecture which is permeable, allowing ventilation and views to the other side.

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 11

Photographs Capture Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Nearing Completion

12:00 - 8 June, 2018
Photographs Capture Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Nearing Completion, © Francesco Russo
© Francesco Russo

Photographer Francesco Russo has captured the construction of Frida Escobedo’s 2018 Serpentine Pavilion, as the structure nears completion in London’s Hyde Park. The images showcase the dark cement roof tiles used to construct the pavilion, which comprises an enclosed courtyard created by two rectangular volumes.

With an interplay of light and water, the pavilion seeks to evoke the sensation of the domestic architecture of Mexico, from where Escobedo hails. The stacked cement tiled visible in the photographs form a "celosia," a type of permeable wall common in Mexico.

© Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo + 8

Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Pavilion To be Moved to Permanent Home in Malaysia

14:00 - 18 December, 2017
Francis Kéré’s  2017 Serpentine Pavilion To be Moved to Permanent Home in Malaysia, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

A month after its critically-lauded run came to a close, Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion has found a permanent home halfway across the globe.

As reported by the Star, the structure has been purchased by Kuala Lumpur-based Ilham Gallery, who are now searching for a permanent site of the pavilion in Malaysia.

Critics Laud Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Pavilion for Its Simplicity and Authenticity

09:30 - 4 July, 2017
Critics Laud Francis Kéré’s 2017 Serpentine Pavilion for Its Simplicity and Authenticity, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

London’s annual temporary architecture pavilion spectacular has returned. Each summer the Serpentine Pavilion program selects an accomplished architect who has yet to create work in the United Kingdom, and asks them to build a temporary shelter on the gallery's lawn. The resulting structure is erected in June and dismantled in October.

This year’s offering is designed by Francis Kéré—the first pavilion designed by an African Architect to grace Kensington Gardens. Kéré’s project is composed of a series of curving blue walls shaded by an elliptical cantilevering wood and steel canopy. Thus far the design has been universally lauded by critics; read on to find out why they thought the project was so appealing.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Iwan Baan © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 6

Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Opens in Sun-Drenched London – But Will Come Alive During Rain

10:30 - 20 June, 2017
Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Opens in Sun-Drenched London – But Will Come Alive During Rain, Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan

The 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), was unveiled today in London. Conceived as a micro cosmos—"a community structure within Kensington Gardens"—the pavilion has been designed to consciously fuse cultural references from Kéré's home town of Gando in Burkino Faso, with "experimental construction techniques." The architect hopes that the pavilion, as a social condenser, "will become a beacon of light, a symbol of storytelling and togetherness."

Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan + 4