1. ArchDaily
  2. Robert Venturi

Robert Venturi: The Latest Architecture and News

Plans to Renovate the Sainsbury Wing and National Gallery in London Receive Approval by the City Council

The Westminister City Council adopted a resolution to grant planning permission to the National Gallery for a series of adaptations, including Selldorf Architects’ restoration proposal for the Sainsbury Wing, originally designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown. The plans to remodel were revealed earlier this year as part of the NG200 Project to celebrate the National Gallery’s bicentennial in 2024. The first intervention proposal for the Sainsbury Wing was met with widespread criticism, which led to a revision of the plans, released in October this year.

Plans to Renovate the Sainsbury Wing and National Gallery in London Receive Approval by the City Council - Image 1 of 4Plans to Renovate the Sainsbury Wing and National Gallery in London Receive Approval by the City Council - Image 2 of 4Plans to Renovate the Sainsbury Wing and National Gallery in London Receive Approval by the City Council - Image 3 of 4Plans to Renovate the Sainsbury Wing and National Gallery in London Receive Approval by the City Council - Image 4 of 4Plans to Renovate the Sainsbury Wing and National Gallery in London Receive Approval by the City Council - More Images+ 3

Learning from Las Vegas: Revisited

Las Vegas, sometimes known as Sin City, is perhaps the most famous desert metropolis where people gamble, and indulge in entertainment, and other vices. Each year, the city is visited by hundreds of millions of tourists who come to see its flashing lights and round-the-clock nightlife. Las Vegas has garnered so much attention that even Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown sought to study its urbanism, concluding with their theories on duck and decorated shed buildings in the early 1970s. But 50 years later, Vegas is still a city that constantly reinvents its architectural identity.

Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism

Selldorf Architects have released a revised version of the plans to remodel the National Gallery and the Sainsbury Wing, both classified as Grade-I-listed monuments. Sainsbury Wing is also the recipient of the 2019 AIA Twenty-five Year Award. The plans for the Sainsbury Wing, designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown and opened in 1991, have faced intense criticism, with former RIBA Journal editor Hugh Pearman calling the remodeling plans “unnecessarily destructive”. The plans to remodel were first revealed earlier this year as part of the NG200 Project to celebrate the National Gallery’s bicentennial in 2024. The project proposes the remodeling of the Sainsbury Wing’s front gates, ground-floor entrance sequence, lobby, and first-floor spaces.

Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 6 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 7 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 1 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - Image 2 of 4Renovation Plans for Venturi Scott Brown’s National Gallery Wing Are Revised After Widespread Criticism - More Images+ 9

What Can Metaverse Planners Learn from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities

We are still at the dawn of the Metaverse, the next wave of the Internet. The current “mainstream” Metaverse platforms serve as experimental containers to host the wildest dreams of virtual worlds where we are supposed to unleash the imagination. However, from a spatial design perspective, they have so far been lame and ordinary. Without the constraints in the physical world, how do we draft the urban blueprints in the metaverse? I believe metaverse planners can find inspiration from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, in which he revealed a poetic and mathematical approach to “urban planning” in the imaginary worlds.

What Can Metaverse Planners Learn from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities - Image 1 of 4What Can Metaverse Planners Learn from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities - Image 2 of 4What Can Metaverse Planners Learn from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities - Image 3 of 4What Can Metaverse Planners Learn from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities - Image 4 of 4What Can Metaverse Planners Learn from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities - More Images+ 8

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

What Is Postmodernism?

As the prefix already indicates, postmodernism is a turning point in history, thereby proving the willingness of scholars to define this new era based on the rejection of the previous movement. Postmodernism first emerged in the 1960s as a departure from modernism. As a reaction against the austerity, formality, and lack of variety of modern architecture, particularly in the international style advocated by Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe, postmodernism defends an architecture full of signs and symbols that can communicate cultural values. Postmodernism is a reaction to homogeneity and tediousness by praising difference and striving to produce buildings that are sensitive to the context within which they are built.

What Is Postmodernism? - Image 2 of 4What Is Postmodernism? - Image 3 of 4What Is Postmodernism? - Image 6 of 4What Is Postmodernism? - Image 8 of 4What Is Postmodernism? - More Images+ 5

125 Best Architecture Books

Architecture has deep wells of research, thought, and theory that are unseen on the surface of a structure. For practitioners, citizens interested, and students alike, books on architecture offer invaluable context to the profession, be it practical, inspirational, academic, or otherwise. So, for those of you looking to expand your bookshelf (or confirm your own tastes), ArchDaily has gathered a broad list of architectural books that we consider of interest to those in the field.

In compiling this list, we sought out titles from different backgrounds with the aim of revealing divergent cultural contexts. From essays to monographs, urban theory to graphic novels, each of the following either engage directly with or flirt on the edges of architecture.

The books on this list were chosen by our editors, and are categorized loosely by type. Read on to see the books we consider valuable to anyone interested in architecture | Last updated in December 2019.

Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

Through their pioneering theory and provocative built work, husband and wife duo Robert Venturi (born June 25, 1925) and Denise Scott Brown (born October 3, 1931) were at the forefront of the postmodern movement, leading the charge in one of the most significant shifts in architecture of the 20th century by publishing seminal books such as Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (authored by Robert Venturi alone) and Learning from Las Vegas (co-authored by Venturi, Scott Brown and Steven Izenour).

Venturi Scott Brown's Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery London Receives AIA 25 Year Award

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected Venturi Scott Brown's Sainsbury Wing at the National Gallery of London as the recipient of the 2019 AIA Twenty-five Year Award. Designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown in an international competition, AIA commended the project for its ability to “...make its context better than it found it” - a citation borrowed from Venturi himself.

The award is presented annually to a project that has "stood the test of time by embodying architectural excellence for 25 to 35 years."

Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries

An exhibition has opened at New York’s Carriage Trade Gallery celebrating the photography of Denise Scott Brown, highlighting the significance of pop art in the American vernacular. The project was initiated by Scott Brown, and first exhibited in Venice in 2016, with the latest events in London and New York initiated by PLANE-SITE.

The exhibition, titled “Photographs 1956-1966” is co-curated by Andres Ramirez, with 10 photographs selected, curated, and featured for limited sale. As well as being on display at the Carriage Trade Gallery, a concurrent exhibition is taking place in the Window Galleries at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, London.

Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries - Image 1 of 4Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries - Image 2 of 4Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries - Image 3 of 4Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries - Image 4 of 4Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries - More Images+ 19