Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid

09:30 - 22 May, 2016
Student Proposal for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard Builds on the Legacy of Zaha Hadid, Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture
Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture

In their semester-long project at Zaha Hadid’s final studio course at the Yale School of Architecture, students Lisa Albaugh, Benjamin Bourgoin, Jamie Edindjiklian, Roberto Jenkins and Justin Oh envisioned a new a high density mixed-use project for London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard, the largest undeveloped piece of land still existing in central London.

Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture +17

Zaha Hadid to be Remembered With Exhibition in Venice

14:00 - 13 May, 2016
Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square. Image © Zaha Hadid Architects
Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square. Image © Zaha Hadid Architects

In celebration of the four decade career of the late Zaha Hadid, Fondazione Berengo will host an exhibition of her paintings, drawings, and models at the 16th century Palazzo Franchetti in Venice, coinciding with the 2016 Venice Biennale. The exhibition will display the full range of Hadid's design work from built projects, to those under construction, and others ultimately never realized. Some of the early, unrealized work that will be represented includes Malevich’s Tektonic, a bridge concept for the Thames River, which Hadid developed while she was still a student at the Architectural Association School in London (1976-77), as well Peak Club, Hong Kong (1982-83), Hafenstrasse, Hamburg (1989), Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square, London (1985), the Victoria City master-plan for Berlin (1988), and the Cardiff Bay Opera House (1994-95).

The Peak, Hong Kong. Image © Zaha Hadid Architects Malevich’s Tektonic . Image © Zaha Hadid Architects Hafenstrasse, Hamburg . Image © Zaha Hadid Architects Victoria City Berlin. Image © Zaha Hadid Architects +9

AD Classics: Bergisel Ski Jump / Zaha Hadid Architects

04:00 - 9 May, 2016
AD Classics: Bergisel Ski Jump / Zaha Hadid Architects, © Helene Binet
© Helene Binet

Situated on the peak of Bergisel Mountain above the picturesque alpine city of Innsbruck, Austria, the Bergisel Ski Jump represents the contemporary incarnation of a historic landmark. Designed by Zaha Hadid between 1999 and 2002, the Ski Jump is a study in formal expression: its sweeping lines and minimalist aesthetic create a sense of graceful, high-speed motion, reflecting the dynamic sensation of a ski jump in a monumental structure that stands above the historic center of Innsbruck and the mountain slopes around.

© Helene Binet © Zaha Hadid Architects © Zaha Hadid Architects © Helene Binet +27

Panel Discussion: Architectural disAssociation

14:00 - 4 May, 2016
Panel Discussion: Architectural disAssociation, Event poster
Event poster

Architectural disAssociation - A reflection on the state of the education of architecture at the AA. Open discussion inviting everyone with an opinion of the school - students, tutors and alumni alike to retrospectively reflect on the state of the AA's unit system and speculate the possible future of its education. This discussion will have no panel as it is an open floor discussion.

AD Classics: Dutch Parliament Extension / OMA

04:00 - 22 April, 2016
AD Classics: Dutch Parliament Extension / OMA, © OMA
© OMA

Designed shortly before Zaha Hadid left the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)—led by Rem Koolhaas—to found her practice, Zaha Hadid Architects, the proposed extension for the Dutch Parliament firmly rejects the notion that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Rather than mimic the style of the existing historic buildings, OMA elected to pay tribute to the complex’s accretive construction by inserting a collection of visibly postmodern, geometric elements. These new buildings, unapologetic products of the late 1970s, would have served as unmistakable indicators of the passage of time, creating a graphic reminder of the Parliament’s long history.

"The Final Push". Image Courtesy of A.D.A. EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. Courtesy of A.D.A. EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. "The Podium: Accommodation for Orgies of Speech". Image Courtesy of A.D.A. EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. Elevations. Image Courtesy of A.D.A. EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. +9

AD Classics: Vitra Fire Station / Zaha Hadid

04:00 - 21 April, 2016
AD Classics: Vitra Fire Station / Zaha Hadid, © Christian Richters
© Christian Richters

Although Zaha Hadid began her remarkable architectural career in the late 1970s, it would not be until the 1990s that her work would lift out her drawings and paintings  to be realized in physical form. The Vitra Fire Station, designed for the factory complex of the same name in Weil-am-Rhein, Germany, was the among the first of Hadid’s design projects to be built. The building’s obliquely intersecting concrete planes, which serve to shape and define the street running through the complex, represent the earliest attempt to translate Hadid’s fantastical, powerful conceptual drawings into a functional architectural space.

© Helene Binet © Helene Binet © Helene Binet © Helene Binet +24

Zaha Hadid Architects Will Complete Four Projects in 2016

16:05 - 19 April, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects Will Complete Four Projects in 2016, © Zaha Hadid Architects
© Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects has 36 projects underway in 21 countries, and four of them will be completed this year. The Salerno Maritime Terminal will open later this month, the Port House, Antwerp, in September, the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC) in Riyadh, in October, and the Mathematics Gallery at the Science Museum in London, in December.

In spite of the untimely death of the practice’s namesake last month, the firm has pledged to continue with its slate of projects, stating, “Zaha is in the DNA of Zaha Hadid Architects. She continues to drive and inspire us every day, and we work on as Zaha taught us – with curiosity, integrity, passion and determination.”

Monocle 24 Explores Women in Architecture

08:00 - 16 April, 2016
Monocle 24 Explores Women in Architecture, Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton + Crow
Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton + Crow

Following the death of Zaha Hadid on March 31st of this year Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, hones in on the role of women in architecture and design. They discuss why, despite an almost 50:50 gender split in undergraduate architecture courses, women are still grossly underrepresented at senior levels within the profession by featuring conversations with two leading female architects, Angela Brady OBE and Amanda Levete. The episode also looks back over the lives of some of architecture's overlooked heroines.

Comic Break: "Sexism in Architecture"

06:00 - 15 April, 2016
Comic Break: "Sexism in Architecture"

Since Zaha Hadid’s death two weeks ago, we’ve been thinking a lot about her legacy. Hadid’s accomplishments in architecture are impressive not only because of her innovative designs, but because she succeeded in a male-dominated profession, and undoubtedly experienced sexism along the way. In our webcomic, Architexts, we use humor to cope with various aspects and stereotypes of the architectural profession, including negative ones. With our forthcoming book, Architects, LOL, we hope to share the stories--your stories--that paint a more realistic picture of the profession, rather than an idealistic one that most of us can only dream of.

Reflections on Zaha Hadid: A Compilation of Introductory Remarks

08:00 - 13 April, 2016

Zaha Hadid’s prolific, admired, and influential body of work led to hundreds of invitations to lecture around the world. Through her contemporaries’ heartfelt introductions, we can appreciate her groundbreaking architectural approach in a world which often appeared to be one step behind her ideas and enthusiasm.

AD Readers Debate: RIP Zaha Hadid

10:30 - 8 April, 2016
AD Readers Debate: RIP Zaha Hadid, © Steve Double
© Steve Double

Of course, the top story in recent weeks has been the sudden death of Dame Zaha Hadid, who passed away last week in Miami. At just 65 years of age, and at the height of her powers as an architect, the news of Hadid’s passing was a shock to many and unsurprisingly was met with grief from many of our readers. Read on to see what tributes those readers left, along with opinions on other stories from recent weeks.

Tributes Pour in With News of Zaha Hadid's Passing

12:00 - 1 April, 2016
Tributes Pour in With News of Zaha Hadid's Passing, Zaha Hadid. Image © Brigitte Lacombe
Zaha Hadid. Image © Brigitte Lacombe

Zaha Hadid's sudden passing has led to an outpouring of heartfelt tributes from some of the profession's most prominent figures. A "brave and radical" trailblazer, and the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize, Hadid's significant impact on the world of architecture is undeniable. She will be missed. 

"We are all shocked and devastated that we lost Zaha today, a most beautiful individual, talent, leader and friend," Patrik Schumacher, Director of Zaha Hadid Architects, wrote on Facebook.

We will continue to update this link as more tributes come in. 

Zaha Hadid Dies Aged 65

11:20 - 31 March, 2016
Zaha Hadid Dies Aged 65, Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE (1950-2016). Image © Steve Double
Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE (1950-2016). Image © Steve Double

The Iraqi-born British Architect Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE (1950-2016) has died aged 65, in Miami, Florida. According to reports from the BBC, Hadid was being treated in hospital for bronchitis when she suffered a heart attack. Earlier this year she became the first sole woman to receive the RIBA Royal Gold Medal at a ceremony in London.

Read on for the official statement from Zaha Hadid Architects: 

Zaha Hadid Receives the RIBA Royal Gold Medal at a Ceremony in London

04:00 - 4 February, 2016

Congratulations to Dame Zaha Hadid who has tonight received the #RoyalGoldMedal for architecture.

Posted by RIBA on Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Zaha Hadid, who was named as the the first sole woman to be awarded the UK's highest honour for architects in her own right in 2015, received the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) 2016 Royal Gold Medal at a ceremony in London yesterday. Hadid, who was appointed a Dame of the British Empire in 2012, received the Pritzker Prize in 2004. Her practice also took both the 2010 and 2011 RIBA Stirling Prizes.

Zaha Hadid and Sou Fujimoto Among 30 to Design Pre-Fab Pavilions for Revolution PreCraft

12:00 - 25 January, 2016
Zaha Hadid and Sou Fujimoto Among 30 to Design Pre-Fab Pavilions for Revolution PreCraft, VOLU Dining Pavilion at Design Miami. Image Courtesy of Revolution PreCraft
VOLU Dining Pavilion at Design Miami. Image Courtesy of Revolution PreCraft

Following the recent trend of luxury pre-fabricated structures like Muji’s recent three huts, Robbie Antonio’s “Revolution PreCraft” is a collection of pre-fabricated pavilions by 30 top designers and architects, including Zaha Hadid, Sou Fujimoto, Daniel Libeskind and Gluckman Tang. Some have already been built, being exhibited at Design Miami, while others are planned for the future.

With recent advancements in building technology, Revolution PreCraft hopes to democratize the design of pre-fab structures, offering a line of products that incorporate the distinct spatial and social brands of the designers. See a selection of the Revolution Precraft line after the break.

Kengo Kuma Denies Copying Zaha Hadid's Tokyo National Stadium Design

12:00 - 19 January, 2016
Kengo Kuma Denies Copying Zaha Hadid's Tokyo National Stadium Design, Kengo Kuma's design. Image © Japan Sport Council
Kengo Kuma's design. Image © Japan Sport Council

In the latest Tokyo National Stadium news, Kengo Kuma is firing back to Zaha Hadid's allegations regarding the "similarities" of the two designs by insisting that his "concept is completely different." As reported the Architects' Journal, the Japanese architect agrees there are some natural similarities due to appropriate sightlines and regulations, however the actual design and concept are radically different.

"I believe that the design by Zaha Hadid was excellent, with a unique shape and demonstration of her philosophy," said Kuma in a press conference. "When we consider the design is being created within the same land, using the same tracks and under the same laws it is natural and almost automatic that there are some similarities which will arise."

"And despite the technical details being similar, the concepts and designs are completely different," he added, referring to Hadid's "saddle-style" design and his flat-roofed proposal. 

JSC Witholds Payment from Zaha Hadid in Exchange for Copyright Release

11:55 - 14 January, 2016
JSC Witholds Payment from Zaha Hadid in Exchange for Copyright Release, Zaha Hadid's design. Image © Japan Sport Council
Zaha Hadid's design. Image © Japan Sport Council

Zaha Hadid is facing new hurdles regarding her scrapped Tokyo National Stadium design; according to the architect, the Japan Sport Council (JSC) is withholding an overdue payment until ZHA agrees to relinquish ownership of their original designs. 

After working on the design for more than two years, the British practice was decommissioned from the project over cost objections last summer. Since, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has been reassigned the project, offering a design that ZHA says is suspiciously similar to their original proposal "in the structure, layout and numerous elements."

Now, the JSC has requested ZHA agrees to new "Compliance Rules" that would allow the stadium's new architect to "use any product of work ... regardless of its copyright."

Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

09:30 - 9 November, 2015
Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

In the mid-1980s, after literature had long been held hostage by postmodernist irony and cynicism, a new wave of authors called for an end to negativity, promoting a "new sincerity" for fiction. Gaining momentum into the 1990s, the movement reached a pinnacle in 1993 when, in his essay E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction, pop-culture seer David Foster Wallace, a proponent of this "new sincerity," made the following call to action: “The next real literary ‘rebels’ in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles... These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the ‘Oh how banal.'"

Architecture, ever in debt to the styles and ideas of other art forms, could learn a thing or two now from the resuscitation of American fiction at the turn of the millennium. It too is enduring an identity crisis, mired by pessimism and uncertainty - a reality made painfully clear this past January when a New York Times Op-Ed by Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, How to Rebuild Architecture, divided camps and made the design world fume. In the editorial, the authors spoke vehemently of an architectural profession that has become mired by egos and been disconnected from public needs. Things quickly got ugly, critics wrestled with critics and subsequently the public got involved. What no one seemed to take into account is that this type of hounding is at the core of the problem. In its current landscape the discipline has struggled with its past, been deferential to its present, and wrestled with the uncertainty of its future. In a moment when we have become addicted to despondency, can anyone win?