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Zaha Hadid-Designed Statuettes for BRIT Awards 2017 Unveiled

16:00 - 1 December, 2016

The designs of the Zaha Hadid-created statuettes to be handed out at this year’s BRIT Awards have been unveiled. One of Hadid’s final commissions before her death this March, the design consists of a family of 5 interrelated trophies take the form of abstracted female figures representing diversity. One of those family members, meant to represent Britannia, the female personification of Great Britain, will be awarded to musicians for their victories in the BRIT Awards ceremony this February.

Zaha Hadid Architects Responds to Patrik Schumacher's "Urban Policy Manifesto"

08:05 - 29 November, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects Responds to Patrik Schumacher's "Urban Policy Manifesto", Courtesy of ZHA
Courtesy of ZHA

On Thursday 17th of November, at the World Architecture Festival in Berlin, Patrik Schumacher gave a lecture offering his theory on how to address London’s Housing crisis. Given Schumacher’s well-known penchant for neoliberal economics, it was perhaps little surprise that his plan included a number of highly controversial ideas, such as the elimination of all forms of social housing and planning, and the privatization of all public space—with Schumacher highlighting Hyde Park as a particularly interesting opportunity.

Though ArchDaily was in attendance at the lecture, we chose not to cover Schumacher’s speech, at least in part because the audible boos from the crowd indicated that this was not a position that the wider architectural profession was interested in giving publicity to. However, the news was picked up by a number of other architectural publications including Dezeen; as a result, Schumacher’s speech became front page news on the London Evening Standard, prompting a response from London Mayor Sadiq Khan who said Schumacher’s ideas were “out of touch” and “just plain wrong.” These developments in turn have prompted an outcry from the architectural profession, causing Zaha Hadid Architects to write an open letter in response to the furore. Read on to see the full letter.

Watch Harvard GSD Celebrate Zaha Hadid in this Discussion Including Patrik Schumacher and Elia Zenghelis

09:30 - 27 November, 2016

In October, the Harvard Graduate School of Design (Harvard GSD) hosted “Zaha Hadid: A Celebration,” an evening of presentations and discussion around the extraordinary work and life of the late Zaha Hadid. Six months on from Hadid’s sudden passing in March, the Dean of Harvard GSD, Mohsen Mostafavi, introduced the event as the appropriate time to focus on creative recognition and “an evening of incredible celebration and enjoyment.”

Article 25's "10x10" Auction Features Work by Zaha Hadid, Kengo Kuma, Richard Meier & Antony Gormley

06:00 - 21 November, 2016
Article 25's "10x10" Auction Features Work by Zaha Hadid, Kengo Kuma, Richard Meier & Antony Gormley, Kyle Henderson. Image Courtesy of Article 25
Kyle Henderson. Image Courtesy of Article 25

In celebration of their 10-year anniversary, Article 25, the world's largest architectural charity, will hold this year's "10x10 Drawing the City London" event on November 29 at the Royal Institute of British Architects. Each year, representatives from UK's top architecture studios and property and design industries gather to raise funds for Article 25's work in developing countries. The event features an auction of artwork by 100 prominent rising artists, designers, and architects; this year's participants include Kengo Kuma, Richard Meier, Antony Gormley, Zaha Hadid Design, and David Adjaye.

Eva Jiricna. Image Courtesy of Article 25 Roger Fitzgerald. Image Courtesy of Article 25 Time Gledstone. Image Courtesy of Article 25 David Adjaye. Image Courtesy of Article 25 +24

Zaha Hadid-Designed Statuettes to be Presented at BRIT Awards 2017

14:00 - 31 October, 2016
Zaha Hadid-Designed Statuettes to be Presented at BRIT Awards 2017, BRIT statue concept sketch by Zaha Hadid Design. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
BRIT statue concept sketch by Zaha Hadid Design. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

The BRIT Awards has announced that the statuettes that will be given during their 2017 awards ceremony have been designed by the late Zaha Hadid.

Hadid had accepted the project in January of this year and developed concepts for the design before her sudden passing in March of this year. The work has since been led by Zaha Hadid Design Director Maha Kutay and the BRIT Awards Niamh Byrne.

“Zaha was truly excited to be doing this,” recalled Kutay. “Her vision was, being an architect, to focus our efforts more on the 3D element, as the statue had previously been used as a canvas for artists to paint on for the last few years. Our design expresses Zaha’s unwavering belief in progress and optimism for the future and a break from the norm.  The biggest challenge was to create something different within certain guidelines, yet achieving a result recognisable to the public. You have to respect the existing to create something new.”

Spotlight: Zaha Hadid

08:00 - 31 October, 2016
Spotlight: Zaha Hadid, Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton+Crow
Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton+Crow

In her lifetime, Pritzker prize-winning architect, fashion designer and artist Zaha Hadid (31 October 1950 – 31 March 2016) became one of the most recognizable faces of our field. Revered and denounced with equal aplomb for the sensuous curved forms for which she was known, Hadid rose to prominence not solely through parametricism but by designing spaces to occupy geometries in new ways. Despite her tragically early death in March of 2016, the projects now being completed by her office without their original lead designer continue to push boundaries both creative and technological, while the fearless media presence she cultivated in recent decades has cemented her place in society as a woman who needs just one name: Zaha.

The Creative Process of Zaha Hadid, As Revealed Through Her Paintings

06:00 - 31 October, 2016
Vision for Madrid - 1992. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid
Vision for Madrid - 1992. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid

Today, on October 31st, we celebrate what would have been the 66th birthday of Zaha Hadid (1950-2016) who tragically died in March. Internationally renowned for her avant-garde search for architectural proposals that reflect modern living, Hadid made abstract topographical studies for many of her projects, intervening with fluid, flexible and expressive works that evoke the dynamism of contemporary urban life.

In honor of Hadid's birthday and in order to further knowledge of her creative process and the development of her professional projects, here we have made a historic selection of her paintings which expand the field of architectural exploration through abstract exercises in three dimensions. These artistic works propose a new and different world view, questioning the physical constraints of design, and showing the creative underpinnings of her career.

The Peak - 1983. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid The World (89 Degrees) - 1983. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Great Utopias - 1992. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Hafenstrasse Development. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid +34

121 Definitions of Architecture

09:30 - 17 October, 2016
121 Definitions of Architecture

There are at least as many definitions of architecture as there are architects or people who comment on the practice of it. While some embrace it as art, others defend architecture’s seminal social responsibility as its most definitive attribute. To begin a sentence with “Architecture is” is a bold step into treacherous territory. And yet, many of us have uttered — or at least thought— “Architecture is…” while we’ve toiled away on an important project, or reflected on why we’ve chosen this professional path.

Most days, architecture is a tough practice; on others, it is wonderfully satisfying. Perhaps, though, most importantly, architecture is accommodating and inherently open to possibility.

This collection of statements illustrates the changing breadth of architecture’s significance; we may define it differently when talking among peers, or adjust our statements for outsiders.

9 Times Architects Transformed Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum

07:00 - 13 October, 2016
Exhibition design by Gae Aulenti. Installation view: The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 1994–January 22, 1995. Photo: David Heald
Exhibition design by Gae Aulenti. Installation view: The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 1994–January 22, 1995. Photo: David Heald

This article originally appeared on guggenheim.org/blogs under the title "Nine Guggenheim Exhibitions Designed by Architects," and is used with permission.

Exhibition design is never straightforward, but that is especially true within the highly unconventional architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. Hanging a painting in a traditional “box” gallery can be literally straightforward, whereas every exhibition at the Guggenheim is the reinvention of one of the world’s most distinctive and iconic buildings. The building mandates site-specific exhibition design—partition walls, pedestals, vitrines, and benches are custom-fabricated for every show. At the same time, these qualities of the building present an opportunity for truly memorable, unique installations. Design happens simultaneously on a micro and macro scale—creating display solutions for individual works of art while producing an overall context and flow that engages the curatorial vision for the exhibition. This is why the museum’s stellar in-house exhibition designers all have an architecture background. They have developed intimate relationships with every angle and curve of the quarter-mile ramp and sloping walls.

The Strange Habits of Top Architects

07:00 - 10 October, 2016

Well-known architects are easy to admire or dismiss from afar, but up close, oddly humanizing habits often come to light. However, while we all have our quirks, most people's humanizing habits don't give an insight into how they became one of the most notable figures in their field of work. The following habits of several top architects reveal parts of their creative process, how they relax, or simply parts of their identity. Some are inspiring and some are surprising, but all give a small insight into the mental qualities that are required to be reach the peak of the architectural profession—from an exceptional work drive to an embrace of eccentricity (and a few more interesting qualities besides).

Zaha Hadid's Successor Patrick Schumacher Discusses Parametricism in Architecture and Fashion

12:00 - 1 October, 2016
Zaha Hadid's Successor Patrick Schumacher Discusses Parametricism in Architecture and Fashion, Images by: Virgile Simon Bertrand, Owencn_95, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects, Thomas Mayer, Khoo Guo Jie
Images by: Virgile Simon Bertrand, Owencn_95, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects, Thomas Mayer, Khoo Guo Jie

As Zaha Hadid’s successor and current leader of the firm, Schumacher relays a host of opinions, including those on parametricism, which he deems the “architectural style of capitalism.” The term describes the avant-garde practice that uses digital animation to create equations for designs. Patrik Schumacher, who coined this term in 2008, believes this style extracts doubt from the design process, relying instead on the infallibility of science.

Serpentine Galleries Names Rogers & Adjaye to Pavilion Selection Board, Announces Zaha Hadid Exhibition

16:30 - 28 September, 2016
Serpentine Galleries Names Rogers & Adjaye to Pavilion Selection Board, Announces Zaha Hadid Exhibition, Images by Hélène Binet, Sylvain Deleu, John Offenbach, Luke Hayes, Claire Byrne, Iwan Baan, Neil MacWilliams, George Rex, NAARO, and Laurian Ghinitoiu
Images by Hélène Binet, Sylvain Deleu, John Offenbach, Luke Hayes, Claire Byrne, Iwan Baan, Neil MacWilliams, George Rex, NAARO, and Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Serpentine Galleries has announced a new process for the selection of architects for its successful Summer Serpentine Pavilion program.

For the event’s first 16 years, the annual commissions were selected by program founder and former Serpentine Galleries director Julia Peyton-Jones, who left her position earlier this year to pursue independent contemporary art and architecture projects. Replacing her are the Serpentine Galleries new CEO Yana Peel and Artistic Director Hans Ulrich Obrist, who will lead an advisory board featuring architects Richard Rogers and David Adjaye.

Step Inside Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House With Thomas Mayer's Photos

11:00 - 25 September, 2016
Step Inside Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House With Thomas Mayer's Photos, © Thomas Mayer
© Thomas Mayer

Opening to much fanfare earlier this week, Zaha Hadid Architects' Port House holds a commanding presence over the port of Antwerp. The design combines a listed and formerly derelict fire station, which was restored as part of the project, with an eye-catching glass extension which rises out of the older building's courtyard and thrusts itself towards the water in a dramatic cantilever. In the context of the port, where large infrastructure and colossal machines form the backdrop to everyday functions, the building boldly stakes its claim as the operational centerpiece, providing a space for the Port of Antwerp's 500 employees. Photographer Thomas Mayer visited the building, capturing its striking external presence and investigating how its structural gymnastics translate to the building's internal space.

© Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer +20

Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

09:15 - 23 September, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Zaha Hadid Architects' new Port House in the Belgian city of Antwerp, which has been almost a decade in planning and construction, officially opens this week. A monumental new structure sits above a repurposed and renovated (formerly derelict) fire station, providing a new headquarters for Europe's second largest shipping port. Housing 500 staff, who will now be under the same roof for the first time, the building represents a sustainable and future-proof workplace for its employees. Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has visited to capture his unique perspective on this new addition to the city's crane-covered skyline.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +42

Video: Zaha Hadid Discusses the Influence of Kazimir Malevich on her Work

16:00 - 1 September, 2016

This video, presented by the BBC, takes a look at the work of Zaha Hadid as inspired by her favorite artist: the Russian Suprematist painter Kazimir Malevich. Featuring interviews with the dame herself, the narrative looks all the way back to Hadid’s origins, including her time at the Architectural Association School in London. It was there that she designed “Malevich’s Tektonik,” a hotel along the Thames River based upon the works of Malevich. Hadid believed that this work radically drove the architectural outlook she would employ for the remainder of her career:

“I was very fascinated by abstraction and how it really could lead to abstracting plans, moving away from certain dogmas about what architecture is. That project really liberated me, freed me from all these rules.”

Check out the video, currently on display as part of the Zaha Hadid retrospective at the Venice Biennale, for more on how Hadid drew inspiration from the Russian artist.

Zaha Hadid's 2007 Serpentine Pavilion Re-Erected at Chatsworth House

16:15 - 29 August, 2016
Zaha Hadid's 2007 Serpentine Pavilion Re-Erected at Chatsworth House

Lilas, Zaha Hadid Architects’ design for the 2007 Serpentine Gallery pavilion, has been reinstalled at a new location on the south lawn of Chatsworth House, the Derbyshire home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. The mushroom-like pavilion has been put on display as part of Sotheby’s annual Beyond Limits sculpture exhibition, and is for sale through the international auction house.

4 Ways You Can Dress Like an Architect

12:00 - 8 August, 2016
4 Ways You Can Dress Like an Architect

1. All black.
2. Black with a bit of grey.
3. Black with a bit of white.
4. Match different shades of black. 

Done. Go home.

All jokes aside, there has never been a set uniform in the architecture profession. The truth is, there are a large variety of different architectural practices, and one’s attire to do architectural work often depends on each firm’s unique culture. There are corporate firms composed of hundreds of people in office blocks where “corporate” clothing is expected, or there are atelier style firms where jeans and a simple shirt are more appropriate for the design-build.

The architecture world is unique in that we are expected to be creative like artists, execute like engineers, negotiate like businessmen, and make like craftsmen but at the same time are asked to discover our own unique style and approach. Hybridity and improvisation abounds in architecture, which is definitely reflected in our fashion choices. In general though, the architect’s wardrobe is governed by four key words: eccentric, professional, relaxed and... well, still largely black.  Here we’ve profiled a few tips on how to dress by these four qualities.

Vintage Festival Shirt via ASOS mac shirt via COS Bjarke Ingels "Yes is More" Tee via Cafe Press Textured Gray Suit via ZARA +33

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

10:30 - 28 June, 2016
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. With this year’s edition featuring not just one pavilion but four additional “summer houses,” the program shows no sign of slowing down. Each of the previous sixteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 16th Pavilion this month, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © © Iwan Baan +34