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Ai: The Latest Architecture and News

Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities

Autodesk has just acquired Spacemaker, a platform that “gives architects and developers the automation superpower to test design concepts in minutes” and explore the best urban design options. Targeting architects, urban designers, and real estate developers, the cloud-based AI-powered generative design helps professionals taking better early-stage design decisions.

Courtesy of SpacemakerCourtesy of SpacemakerCourtesy of SpacemakerCourtesy of Spacemaker+ 13

BIG Designs AI CITY, an Innovation Campus Hosting Headquarters of Tech Firm in Chongqing, China

BIG has unveiled its design for AI CITY, the future home for Terminus Group, a smart service provider. Imagined as the new center of innovation for China, the project will be dedicated to "artificial intelligence, robotics, networking, and big data”. Located in Chongqing, in southwest China, known as the “mountain city”, the project is set within the Chongqing Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.

Courtesy of BIGCourtesy of Lucian R and BIGCourtesy of Lucian R and BIGCourtesy of Lucian R and BIG+ 24

Reparametrize Studio Reveals Innovative and Smart Post-War Housing System, Using Advanced AI Technology

Part of Reparametrize Studio’s ongoing research on “Re-Coding Post War –Syria”, “House Re-Coding” is a new generation of housing solutions adaptable to the post-war cities. Focusing on innovation, collecting comprehensive infrastructural and socioeconomic analytics data through Artificial intelligence, the project seeks to envision the future of post-war cities, as a Smart urban development where all different actors come together, using the existing, and still useful, urban fabric.

Courtesy of Reparametrize StudioCourtesy of Reparametrize StudioCourtesy of Reparametrize StudioCourtesy of Reparametrize Studio+ 18

The Future of Universities, Offices and Cities: Highlights From Digital Futures 2020

Like most functions in recent months, this year’s Digital FUTURES, which is held annually since 2011 at Tongji University in Shanghai, had to move online due to the pandemic. The organizers took this as an opportunity to give the event a global dimension, turning the festival into what they rightfully call the most significant worldwide event for architectural education ever staged, with a 24/7 display of workshops, lectures and panel discussions involving some of the most prominent architects and educators. Here is an overview of the festival, together with a selection of lectures from Digital FUTURES World.

Open Resources to Become Knowledgeable in the Field of AI

As Artificial Intelligence has become one of the most significant forces driving innovation and economic development, this societal transformation requires new knowledge and an additional set of skills. Just as knowing a BIM software has become a prerequisite for most architecture jobs, understanding or even knowing how to use AI-related tools would become a desirable asset, if not a requirement in the future. However, with a vast array of information available, how does one begin to venture into this topic? The following is a compilation of online resources, lectures, and courses, that could provide a better understanding of the field and how to incorporate it into the practice of architecture.

White Arkitekter + ReGen Villages Create First Circular, Self-Sufficient Communities for Sweden

White Arkitekter, in collaboration with Silicon Valley-based ReGen Villages, have joined forces to create fully circular, self-sufficient and resilient communities in Sweden. Inspired by computer games, the project puts in place organic food production, locally produced and stored energy, comprehensive recycling, and climate positive buildings.

Pioneers: 6 Practices Bringing AI into Architecture

In this article, we tap into how AI could be augmenting, changing design processes, and how architects and other professionals are responding and incorporating these technological advancements into their design work. What kind of innovation can AI bring to this industry, and what has been experimented with so far? This selection of projects can help form an opinion on the architectural application of AI.

A Virtual Tour of AI & Architecture at the Pavillon de l'Arsenal in Paris

The AI & Architecture at the Pavillon de l'Arsenal in Paris, France was scheduled to be open for the past couple of months, showcasing work by Stanislas Chaillou on generative design and machine learning. However, due to the global pandemic, people were able to virtually explore the ideas through a series of interviews and a virtual tours. The work explored current scales of experimentation: plans, elevations, structures and perspectives in which AI could already make a contribution, whether real or speculative.

Courtesy of Pavillon de l'ArsenalCourtesy of Stanislas Chaillou, Pavillon de l'ArsenalCourtesy of Pavillon de l'ArsenalCourtesy of Pavillon de l'Arsenal+ 9

Will Technology Replace Architects? Artist Sebastian Errazuriz Explains Why "Architects Will Need To Find New Jobs"

Joris Laarman for MX3d
Joris Laarman for MX3d

Will architects be one of the professionals who will be replaced by AI in the near future? New York-based artist Sebastián Errázuriz recently opened the debate in one of his latest Instagram videos.

Errázuriz, also known for his critique/proposal of the reconstruction of the Notre-Dame church, says that it is very likely that the future of the profession as we know it might disappear. Thanks to technological advancements, only a small elite of architects who maintain architecture as an artistic practice might be the ones who will continue to practice the discipline as we know it.

BuildTech Futures: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

Artificial intelligence, machine learning and generative design have begun to shape architecture as we know it. As systems and tools to reimagine the built environment, they present diverse opportunities to rethink traditional workflows. Designers also fear they may inversely affect practice, limiting the services of the architect. Looking to building technologies, new companies are creating software and projects to explore the future of design.

Unexpected Ways Our Cities Are Becoming Smarter

Cities across the globe are undergoing makeovers - swapping out old, antiquated technology for new, sleek alternatives. The development and implementation of computer vision and real-time analytics are ushering in the newest wave of smart cities. The combination of cloud-based dashboards and machine learning are providing actionable data to be collected and understood regarding everything from vehicle concentration to pedestrian activity. As cities continue to push forward and develop socially and technologically, there is no doubt we will continue to see cities incorporate tools like Artificial Intelligence (AI) to facilitate such changes. Despite the fact that eye-popping technologies like drones and robots are at the forefront of this technological revolution, there are also a number of unexpected ways cities are becoming smarter.

AI Creates Generative Floor Plans and Styles with Machine Learning at Harvard

Designer and Fulbright fellow Stanislas Chaillou has created a project at Harvard utilizing machine learning to explore the future of generative design, bias and architectural style. While studying AI and its potential integration into architectural practice, Chaillou built an entire generation methodology using Generative Adversarial Neural Networks (GANs). Chaillou's project investigates the future of AI through architectural style learning, and his work illustrates the profound impact of style on the composition of floor plans.

Courtesy of Stanislas ChaillouCourtesy of Stanislas ChaillouCourtesy of Stanislas ChaillouCourtesy of Stanislas Chaillou+ 16

"I Don't Really See AI as A Threat": Imdat As on Artificial Intelligence in Architecture

Is Artificial Intelligence (AI) the doom of the architecture profession and design services (as some warn) or a way to improve the overall design quality of the built environment, expanding and extending design services in ways yet to be explored? I sat down with my University of Hartford colleague Imdat As. Dr. As is an architect with an expertise in digital design who is an assistant professor of architecture and the co-founder of Arcbazar.com, a crowd-sourced design site. His current research on AI and its impact on architectural design and practice is funded by the US Department of Defense. Recently we sat down and talked about how this emerging technology might change design and practice as we now know it—and if so, would that be such a bad thing?

This article was originally published as "Doom or Bloom: What Will Artificial Intelligence Mean for Architecture?" on CommonEdge. It has been slightly abridged for publication on this platform; the full interview can be read on CommonEdge here.

Could Computer Algorithms Design the Floor Plans of the Future?

Optimized Floor Plan. Image Courtesy of Joel Simon
Optimized Floor Plan. Image Courtesy of Joel Simon

Programmer Joel Simon has created an experimental research project, Evolving Floor Plans, to explore speculative and optimized plan layouts using generative design. Interested in the intersection of computer science, biology and design, Joel organized rooms and expected flow of people through a genetic algorithm to minimize walking time, the use of hallways, etc.

The creative goal is to approach floor plan design solely from the perspective of optimization and without regard for convention or constructability. The research aims to see how a combination of explicit, implicit and emergent methods allow floor plans of high complexity to evolve.

Optimized Floor Plan. Image Courtesy of Joel SimonHallways. Image Courtesy of Joel SimonWindows. Image Courtesy of Joel SimonMapping Overview. Image Courtesy of Joel Simon+ 5

Towards a Robotic Architecture

The field of robotics is coming of age. Robotics and artificial intelligence represent the next cutting edge technology to transform the fields of architecture and design. The past decade's surge towards more computationally defined building systems and highly adaptable open-source design software has left the field ripe for the integration of robotics wither through large-scale building fabrication or through more intelligent/adaptive building systems. Through this surge, architecture has not only been greatly influenced by these emerging technologies, but has also begun influencing other disciplines in unexpected ways. The purpose of this book is to provide systems of classification, categorization and

Amazon's Futuristic Checkout-Free Convenience Store Opens with Just a Few Kinks

Amazon’s innovative, checkout-free convenience store concept, Amazon Go, has opened to the public in Seattle.

Located in the base of an existing Amazon office building, the 1,800-square-foot (167-square-meter) store offers grocery and convenience items. To begin shopping, customers simply scan an Amazon Go smartphone app and pass through a turnstile.

Using machine learning, computer vision and artificial intelligence technologies (incorporated into the software powering cameras and weight sensors), the store can then track the actions of customers as they remove items from the shelves, creating a virtual shopping list as they go. When a customer is finished shopping, they simply exit the store through the turnstiles and the user’s Amazon account is automatically charged.

Installation Showing the Perspective of a Self-Driving Car Aims to Evoke Empathy for Artificial Intelligence

Driver Less Vision, an installation at the 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism by Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin, is an immersive 3D video experience comprised of spatial scans of Seoul, projected into a dome and paired with surround sound. The supporting audio is the internal monologue of a personified autonomous vehicle, driving through the streets of a future Seoul, Korea. The installation transports vierers to the front seat of the autonomous vehicle, providing a new perspective of traversing cities—through the car’s point of view.

Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel PerlinCourtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel PerlinCourtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel PerlinCourtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin+ 9