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Hudson Yards: The Latest Architecture and News

Solo Visitors No Longer Allowed on Heatherwick Studio's Vessel After Reopening

Following it's closure in January 2021, the 150-foot monumental staircase in Hudson Yards have reopened to the public on May 28th, but with a ban on solo visitors. The closure was confirmed after three individuals committed suicide since its opening in 2019, all under the age of 25. The structure was “temporarily closed” amid consultations by the firm with suicide-prevention experts and psychiatrists about how to prevent more potential suicides.

Courtesy of Michael Moran for Related-OxfordCourtesy of Forbes Massie - Heatherwick StudioCourtesy of Michael Moran for Related-OxfordCourtesy of Michael Moran for Related-Oxford+ 10

Paul Clemence Captures BIG's Spiral Skyscraper in New York City

Paul Clemence has just released recent photos of Bjarke Ingels Group’s Spiral skyscraper, an under-construction 1,000 feet tall tower with a series of stepped landscaped terraces. Set for completion in 2022, the highrise that topped out in February of this year, is located at Hudson Yards in New York City.

© Paul Clemence© Paul Clemence© Paul Clemence© Paul Clemence+ 29

50 Hudson Yards by Foster + Partners Tops Out

The 50 Hudson Yards skyscraper by Foster + Partners has topped out in New York. As one of the largest office buildings in the city, the project has become the fourth-biggest office tower by square footage. The 58-story office tower includes very large floor plates for up to 500 employees on each floor. The tower is the latest in a series of projects rounding out the Hudson Yards on the western edge of Manhattan.

Courtesy of Foster + PartnersCourtesy of Foster + PartnersCourtesy of Foster + PartnersCourtesy of Foster + Partners+ 5

Updated Images Reveal Interior Space of Heatherwick’s Lantern House in New York

New renderings were unveiled for Heatherwick’s first residential project in New York, currently under construction. The recently dubbed “Lantern House”, in West Chelsea’s neighborhood, will join a series of developments, expanding the High Line's facades.

Courtesy of Heatherwick StudioCourtesy of Heatherwick StudioCourtesy of Heatherwick StudioCourtesy of Heatherwick Studio+ 18

Highest Outdoor Sky Deck in the Western Hemisphere Set to Open in 2020

The highest outdoor observation deck in the western hemisphere is set to open in March of 2020 in New York City. Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF), the Edge cantilevers 80 feet from the 100th floor of 30 Hudson Yards. At a record-setting height of 1,131 feet, Edge will reveal never-before-seen views of The City, Western New Jersey and New York State spanning up to 80 miles.

© Connie ZhouCourtesy of KPF ArchitectsCourtesy of Related Oxford© Connie Zhou+ 17

Hudson Yards and Notre-Dame: A One-Two Punch of Megalomania

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

In recent months, two events have done more harm to the “brand” of architecture in the public’s perception than anything I’ve experienced in the 40 years that I have been in the profession.

First, there was the grand opening of New York City’s Hudson Yards, a massive $20 billion development on Manhattan’s far west side. This first phase opened after seven years of construction and included an obligatory gathering of “world class” architects—Kohn Pedersen Fox, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, SOM, The Rockwell Group—as well a folly by designer Thomas Heatherwick.

What could possibly go wrong?

The Shed Opens in New York's Hudson Yards

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group's iconic Shed has opened after more than a decade in the making in New York City. The building features a 120-foot telescopic shell in Hudson Yards that can extend out from the base building when needed for larger performances. Clad in ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) “pillows,” the project is connected to the High Line on 30th Street to bring performances and art to the city's newest neighborhood,

The Shed. Image © Timothy SchenckThe Shed. Image © Iwan BaanThe Shed. Image © Iwan BaanThe Shed. Image © Timothy Schenck+ 8

The Many Faces of Hudson Yards' Vessel

Hudson Yards’ Large Honeycomb… Hudson Yards’ New Shawarma Sculpture…”
Call it what you want, but the Vessel has created quite a buzz over the past couple of weeks, and it is not just because of its impressive architecture, or the panoramic view at the top (to which some claimed that getting there was an uncalled for work-out).

After coming across different nicknames of Hudson Yards’ now-famous point of attraction, architectural designer and illustrator Chanel Dehond selected some of the most amusing ones and transformed them into sketches.

Tell us, ArchDaily readers, what do you call the Vessel?

The Hoberman . Image © Chanel DehondThe Basket . Image © Chanel DehondThe Beehive . Image © Chanel DehondThe Faberge Egg. Image © Chanel Dehond+ 11

Critical Round-Up: Hudson Yards

New York City’s Hudson Yards has opened its doors to the public, and the reviews are flooding in. Built on Midtown Manhattan’s West Side, the project is New York’s largest development to date and the largest private real estate venture in American history, covering almost 14 acres of land with residential towers, offices, plazas, shopping centers, and restaurants. A host of architecture firms have shaped the development, including BIG, SOM, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Rockwell Group, and many others.

Read on to find out how critics have responded to Hudson Yards so far.

Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordHudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordHudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordHudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford+ 15

New York City's Hudson Yards Is Finally Open to the Public

New York City’s long-awaited Hudson Yards has finally opened its doors to the public for the first time. Built on Midtown Manhattan’s West Side, the project is New York’s largest development to date and the United States’ largest private real estate development, covering almost 14 acres of land (more than 56,000 sqm) with polished residential towers, offices, plazas, gardens, shopping centers, and restaurants, all designed by some of the world’s most iconic architects.

Aerial View of Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordCourtesy of Francis Dzikowski for Related-OxfordCourtesy of Francis Dzikowski for Related-OxfordVessel. Image Courtesy of Francis Dzikowski for Related-Oxford+ 27

SOM Reveals 35 Hudson Yards Tower for New York

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill have revealed new images of their design for 35 Hudson Yards, a new tower that will be part of the largest private real estate development in the history of the United States. SOM provided architectural design and structural engineering services for the mixed-use tower in New York, which is set to become the tallest residential building in Hudson Yards. Standing 1,000 feet tall, the project will express transitions in program as a series of setbacks twisting around the tower.

35 Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related Oxford35 Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related Oxford35 Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related Oxford35 Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related Oxford+ 12

DXA Studio Designs New Urban Pathway for New York

Architecture and design firm DXA studio was awarded Grand Prize for their design for an urban pathway in New York City. Submitted for Construction Magazine’s 2019 Design Challenge, the project would span 9th Avenue to connect the new Moynihan Train Hall to the High Line and Hudson Yards. The design was created to push the boundaries of contemporary steel construction and create a signature public pathway for New York.

The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studioThe Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studioThe Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studioThe Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio+ 10

Construction Begins on BIG's Spiral Skyscraper in Manhattan

© Tishman Speyer
© Tishman Speyer

Construction has begun on “The Spiral,” a 1,031-foot-tall project in New York’s Hudson Yards designed by Bjarke Ingels Group. The fifth supertall to be added to the area, The Spiral was commissioned by developer Tishman Speyer as part of the ongoing revitalization of the Midtown West region of Manhattan.

The tower is named after its defining feature - an "ascending ribbon of lively green spaces" that extend the High Line "to the sky," says Bjarke Ingels. The scheme will offer 2.85 million of office space, with the anchor tenant Pfizer occupying 18 floors, according to New York YIMBY.

© Tishman Speyer© Tishman Speyer© Tishman Speyer© Tishman Speyer+ 7

Months Before Opening Day, the Promised - and Sold - High-Tech Utopia of Hudson Yards is Still Just a Dream

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Hudson Yards Promised a High-Tech Neighborhood — It was a Greater Challenge Than Expected."

There’s something striking about the command center of America’s largest private real estate development, Hudson Yards, in that it’s actually pretty boring. The room—technically known as the Energy Control Center, or ECC for short—contains two long desks crammed with desktop computers, a few TV monitors plastered to the wall, and a corkboard lined with employee badges. The ceiling is paneled; the lighting, fluorescent. However, New York’s Hudson Yards was once billed as the country’s first “quantified community”: A network of sensors would collect data on air quality, noise levels, temperature, and pedestrian traffic. This would create a feedback loop for the developers, helping them monitor and improve quality of life. So where is the NASA-like mission control? Data collection and advanced infrastructure will still drive parts of Hudson Yards’ operations, but not (yet) as first advertised.

The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year

For those in the northern hemisphere, the last full week in January last week kicks off with Blue Monday - the day claimed to be the most depressing of the year. Weather is bleak, sunsets are early, resolutions are broken, and there’s only the vaguest glimpse of a holiday on the horizon. It’s perhaps this miserable context that is making the field seem extra productive, with a spate of new projects, toppings out and, completions announced this week.

The week of 21 January 2019 in review, after the break: 

LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode© TMRW, courtesy of Gensler©Jaime NavarroThe Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year+ 11

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group's Hudson Yards Skyscraper Completed in Manhattan

Construction has completed on Diller Scofidio + Renfro (Lead Architect) and Rockwell Group's (Lead Interior Architect) 15 Hudson Yards, an 88-story skyscraper marking the first residential project in the Manhattan masterplan. The scheme is now open with 60% of residential units already sold, totaling over $800 million in sales.

The tower marks DS+R and Rockwell Group's first skyscraper, designed in collaboration with executive architects Ismael Leyva. The scheme topped out in February 2018 to its architectural height of 914 feet.

Courtesy of Timothy Schenck for Related-OxfordCourtesy of Timothy Schenck for Related-OxfordCourtesy of Timothy Schenck for Related-OxfordCourtesy of Timothy Schenck for Related-Oxford+ 11

New Renderings Revealed of The Shed at Hudson Yards as ETFE Cladding is Installed

New renderings and details of The Shed at Hudson Yards have been revealed as the structure’s ETFE panels continue to be installed ahead of its Spring 2019 opening date.

The new images show how some of the cultural venue’s interior spaces will look, including the galleries and the vast event space created when the wheeled steel structure is rolled out to its furthest extents. This space will be known as “the McCourt,” named after businessman Frank McCourt Jr, who donated $45 million to the project.

Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group, the 200,000-square-foot cultural center was envisioned as a spiritual successor to Cedric Price’s visionary “Fun Palace,” a flexible framework that could transform to host different types of events.

Rendering of The McCourt, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell GroupRendering of the Gallery on Level 4, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell GroupRendering of The McCourt with seating, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell GroupRendering of The McCourt with standing room, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group+ 9

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group's 15 Hudson Yards Tops Out

Hudson Yards’ first condominium tower, 15 Hudson Yards, has topped out at its full architectural height of 914 feet, with exterior cladding also more than halfway complete. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (the firm’s first true skyscraper) in collaboration with Rockwell Group and executive architects Ismael Leyva Architects, the tower will contain a total of 285 residences, half of which have already been sold.

15 Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordFacade View. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordAquatics Center. Image Courtesy of Related-OxfordDuplex Penthouse interior. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford+ 30