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Adolf Loos: The Latest Architecture and News

Ornament, Crime & Prejudice: Where Loos' Manifesto Fails to Understand People

09:30 - 2 January, 2019
Ornament, Crime & Prejudice: Where Loos' Manifesto Fails to Understand People, © Aga Khan Award for Architecture
© Aga Khan Award for Architecture

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "African Architecture: Ornament, Crime & Prejudice."

The 9 Bars That Every Architect Needs to Visit

06:00 - 3 August, 2018
The 9 Bars That Every Architect Needs to Visit, The cafe and bar at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London / Zaha Hadid Architects. . Image © Luke Hayes
The cafe and bar at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London / Zaha Hadid Architects. . Image © Luke Hayes

When you think of your favorite spot to grab a beer, what architectural features come to mind? Is it the swanky furniture, themed artwork, or the heavily designed cocktail menu? Today, the aesthetics of bars are now as much a draw as the drinks themselves. From movie set inspired spaces to rooftops that offer spectacular city views, we’ve compiled a list of nine bars and beer gardens that every architect needs to cross off their list.

How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?

09:30 - 2 July, 2018
How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?, Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet
Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet

From the Fundación Arquia Blog, architect José Ramón Hernandez brings us an article that reflects on projects that can only be appreciated because of who they were created by. If it weren't for the fact that they bear the signature of their illustrious creator, they most likely would have gone completely unnoticed or even despised.

Spotlight: Adolf Loos

04:00 - 10 December, 2017
Spotlight: Adolf Loos, Goldman & Salatsch Building. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Looshaus_Michaelerplatz.JPG'>Wikimedia user Thomas Ledl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>
Goldman & Salatsch Building. Image © Wikimedia user Thomas Ledl licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Adolf Loos (December 10, 1870 – August 23, 1933) was one of the most influential European architects of the late 19th century and is often noted for his literary discourse that foreshadowed the foundations of the entire modernist movement. As an architect, his influence is primarily limited to major works in what is now Austria and the Czech Republic, but as a writer he had a major impact on the development of 20th century architecture, producing a series of controversial essays that elaborated on his own architectural style by decrying ornament and a range of social ills. Adolf Loos’s minimalist attitudes are reflected in the works of Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and many other modernists and led to a fundamental shift in the way architects perceived ornamentation.

Architectural Adventures: Vibrant Vienna

15:16 - 16 November, 2017
Architectural Adventures: Vibrant Vienna, Haas Haus | Courtesy of Rene Wildgrube
Haas Haus | Courtesy of Rene Wildgrube

Brimming with architectural innovation, Vienna stands at the crossroads of Europe. Its location between north and south, east and west has always made it open to new ideas, even as the city carefully groomed its signature refinement and grace.

How Chicago’s Tribune Tower Competition Changed Architecture Forever

16:00 - 3 October, 2017
How Chicago’s Tribune Tower Competition Changed Architecture Forever, © Steve Hall
© Steve Hall

This article was originally published on the blog of the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the largest platform for contemporary architecture in North America. The 2017 Biennial, entitled Make New History, will be free and open to the public between September 16, 2017 and January 6, 2018.

The Tribune Tower has stood at the heart of Chicago’s cultural heritage for almost a hundred years. Like the spire of a secular cathedral, it still symbolizes the rise of the “city of big shoulders” and its defining role in the American Century. But the building is more than a Chicago icon. The story of its origin has proved to be one of the most enduringly influential narratives in 20th Century architecture, key to understanding the skylines of cities all over the world.

The “late entries” included fantastical designs by Helmut Jahn, Judith Di Maio, Arquitectonica, and Robert A.M. Stern. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial Blog (Consortia) Some of the more radical proposals for the Tribune Tower by Walter Gropius and Adolf Meyer; Max Taut; Adolf Loos; and Bruno Taut, Walter Gunther, and Kurz Schutz. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial Blog (Consortia) For nearly a century, Chicago’s Tribune Tower has stood at the heart of the city’s cultural heritage. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial Blog (Consortia) A reconstruction of Loos’ proposal (center) accompanies new towers by an international group of young architects. Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial. Image © Steve Hall + 8

How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects

09:30 - 17 April, 2017
How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects

There’s no doubt that one of the best things about architecture is its universality. Wherever you come from, whatever you do, however you speak, architecture has somehow touched your life. However, when one unexpectedly has to pronounce a foreign architect’s name... things can get a little tricky. This is especially the case when mispronunciation could end up making you look less knowledgeable than you really are. (If you're really unlucky, it could end up making you look stupid in front of your children and the whole world.)

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of 22 architects with names that are a little difficult to pronounce, and paired them with a recording in which their names are said impeccably. Listen and repeat as many times as it takes to get it right, and you’ll be prepared for any intellectual architectural conversation that comes your way. 

A Selection of Name-Based Architecture Memes

06:00 - 13 January, 2017

The world of architecture can be a serious place. Though the rest of the world holds quite a few stereotypes about architects, unfortunately none of them include us having a sense of humor—and perhaps that seriousness explains why one of the most popular memes involving architects isn't exactly favorable to the profession. Here at ArchDaily we thought we'd do just a little to correct that with some memes riffing on some of the profession's most beloved names—as our gift to the entire architectural profession. Read on to see what we've come up with, and don't forget to get involved with your own architecture funnies.

8 Short Architectural Texts You Need To Know

10:30 - 14 November, 2016
8 Short Architectural Texts You Need To Know, © Sharon Lam, using an image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Adolfloos.2.jpg'>Wikimedia user Martin H.</a> licensed under Public Domain
© Sharon Lam, using an image by Wikimedia user Martin H. licensed under Public Domain

© Sharon Lam, using an image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Denise_Scott_Brown_portrait_by_%C2%A9Lynn_Gilbert,_1977.jpg'>Wikimedia user LynnGilbert5</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> © Sharon Lam, using an image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Junichiro_Tanizaki_1913.jpg'>Wikimedia user Suiten</a> licensed under Public Domain © Sharon Lam, using image via screenshot from <a href='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vc5XmTbGtVQ'>12.1.12 Lecture / Reading Lisa Robertson et Abigail Lang</a> © Sharon Lam, using an image by © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/strelka/15069054410'>Flickr user Strelka</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 10

Update: We've added links to help you find these books for purchase and, in 5 of 8 cases, tracked down a way you can read them online for free!

Quality over quantity, so the saying goes. With so many concepts floating around the architectural profession, it can be difficult to keep up with all the ideas which you're expected to know. But in architecture and elsewhere, the most memorable ideas are often the ones that can be condensed textually: “form follows function,” “less is more,” “less is a bore.” Though slightly longer than three words, the following lists a selection of texts that don’t take too long to read, but impart long-lasting lessons, offering you the opportunity to fill gaps in your knowledge quickly and efficiently. Covering everything from loos to Adolf Loos, the public to the domestic, and color to phenomenology, read on for eight texts to place on your reading list:

The Long(ish) Read: "Ornament and Crime" by Adolf Loos

04:00 - 2 November, 2016
The Long(ish) Read: "Ornament and Crime" by Adolf Loos, Villa Müller (1930), Czech Republic / Adolf Loos
Villa Müller (1930), Czech Republic / Adolf Loos

Welcome to the fourth installment of The Long(ish) Read: an AD feature which presents texts written by notable essayists that resonate with contemporary architecture, interior architecture, urbanism or landscape design. Ornament and Crime began as a lecture delivered by Adolf Loos in 1910 in response to a time (the late 19th and early 20th Centuries) and a place (Vienna), in which Art Nouveau was the status quo.

Loos used the essay as a vehicle to explain his distain of "ornament" in favour of "smooth and previous surfaces," partly because the former, to him, caused objects and buildings to become unfashionable sooner, and therefore obsolete. This—the effort wasted in designing and creating superfluous ornament, that is—he saw as nothing short of a "crime." The ideas embodied in this essay were forerunners to the Modern movement, including practices that would eventually be at core of the Bauhaus in Weimar.

Sam Jacob Studio "Resurrects" Unrealized Adolf Loos Mausoleum in London Cemetery

14:00 - 24 September, 2016
Sam Jacob Studio "Resurrects" Unrealized Adolf Loos Mausoleum in London Cemetery , © Sarah Duncan
© Sarah Duncan

Sam Jacob Studio has created a replica of Adolf Loos’ unrealized 1921 mausoleum in Highgate Cemetary, London, which is home to the graves of Karl Marx and Malcolm McLaren, amongst other notable figures.

© Harry Mitchell © Sarah Duncan © Sarah Duncan © Harry Mitchell + 6

Alternative Realities: 7 Radical Buildings That Could-Have-Been

09:30 - 21 September, 2015
Alternative Realities: 7 Radical Buildings That Could-Have-Been, Masterplan for the World Trade Center by Richard Meier & Partners, Eisenman Architects, Gwathmey Siegel and Associates, and Steven Holl Architects. Image © Jock Pottle. Courtesy Richard Meier & Partners Architects
Masterplan for the World Trade Center by Richard Meier & Partners, Eisenman Architects, Gwathmey Siegel and Associates, and Steven Holl Architects. Image © Jock Pottle. Courtesy Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In It’s A Wonderful Life the film’s protagonist George Bailey, facing a crisis of faith, is visited by his guardian angel, and shown an alternate reality where he doesn’t exist. The experience gives meaning to George’s life, showing him his own importance to others. With the increasing scale of design competitions these days, architectural “could-have-beens” are piling up in record numbers, and just as George Bailey's sense of self was restored by seeing his alternate reality, hypothesizing about alternative outcomes in architecture is a chance to reflect on our current architectural moment.

Today marks the one-year-anniversary of the opening of Phase 3 of the High Line. While New Yorkers and urbanists the world over have lauded the success of this industrial-utility-turned-urban-oasis, the park and the slew of other urban improvements it has inspired almost happened very differently. Although we have come to know and love the High Line of Diller Scofidio + Renfro and James Corner Field Operations, in the original ideas competition four finalists were chosen and the alternatives show stark contrasts in how things might have shaped up.

On this key date for one of the most crucial designs of this generation, we decided to look back at some of the most important competitions of the last century to see how things might have been different.

Joseph Marzella's second-place design for the Sydney Opera House. Image via The Daily Mail Designs for the Chicago Tribune Tower by Adolf Loos (left) and Bruno Taut, Walter Gunther, and Kurz Schutz (right). Image via skyscraper.org Design for the High Line by Zaha Hadid Architects with Balmori Associates, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP and studio MDA. Image via University of Adelaide on Cargo Collective Moshe Safdie's design for the Centre Pompidou. Image Courtesy of Safdie Architects + 16