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Richard Rogers: The Latest Architecture and News

Sir Richard Rogers' First Residential Project in New York City Nears Completion

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners have unveiled images of their latest venture, No. 33 Park Row in New York City. Located across the street from City Hall Park in Downtown Manhattan, the project, nearing completion and set to officially launch in the spring of 2021, is the city’s first residential project designed by Sir Richard Rogers and Graham Stirk of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners.

Courtesy of ir Richard Rogers and Graham Stirk of Rogers Stirk Harbour + PartnersCourtesy of ir Richard Rogers and Graham Stirk of Rogers Stirk Harbour + PartnersCourtesy of ir Richard Rogers and Graham Stirk of Rogers Stirk Harbour + PartnersCourtesy of ir Richard Rogers and Graham Stirk of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners+ 6

Selected Projects of Pritzker Laureates’ in 2020

This year, architecture’s highest honor, the Pritzker Prize, has been granted to Grafton Architects, a Dublin-based architectural firm mainly ran by female partners Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara. For the first time ever in its 42-year history, due to the constraints set by Covid-19 global pandemic, the organizers of the Pritzker Prize decided to use Livestream the award ceremony. Having reached the end of 2020, ArchDaily has summed up what current and previous Pritzker Prize winners have accomplished during this turbulent year.

Richard Rogers Retires After 43 Years of Practice

Richard Rogers has retired from Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners after founding the practice 43 years ago. As one of Britain’s greatest living architects, he is known for iconic, hi-tech architecture, including the Lloyd’s building in London and the Pompidou Centre in Paris. The Pritzker Prize-winner has become one of the world's most distinct architects, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is both recognizable and adaptable.

Courtesy of Estudio Lamela & Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners© Grant SmithCourtesy of Edmund Sumner© Mark Ramsay+ 13

Richard Rogers, One of the Leading Architects of the British High-Tech Movement

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 1970s and '80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.

NEO Bankside. Image Courtesy of Edmund SumnerThe Leadenhall Building. Image © Richard Bryant – Courtesy of British Land/Oxford PropertiesLloyd's of London Building. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/332669479'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>Millennium Dome. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesjin/58712717/'>Flickr user jamesjin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>+ 18

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

Harvard GSD Announces 2020 Richard Rogers Fellowship

Harvard University Graduate School of Design has announced the 2020 Richard Rogers Fellowship cycle. Open to accomplished practitioners and scholars working in fields related to the built environment, the research-focused residency program is based in London at the Wimbledon House, designed by Lord Richard Rogers in the late 1960s. Fellows have researched a diverse series of topics, including examinations of public and affordable housing; how food and cooking transform cities; and citizen-driven urban regeneration initiatives, among others.

7 Architects Who Weren't Afraid to Use Color

Interior of Casa Gilardi. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ACasa_Liraldi_Luis_Barrag%C3%A1n.JPG'> Wikimedia user Ulises00</a> licensed under <a href=' https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_domain'>Public Domain</a>Casa Batlló. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Barcelona_Casa_Batll%C3%B3_DachterrasseKamine.jpg'>Wikimedia user M.Stallbaum</a> licensed under <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_domain'>Public Domain</a>St. Coletta School / Michael Graves. Image Courtesy of Michael GravesCafé l'Aubette. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Strasbourg_Cin%C3%A9_Bal_de_l%27Aubette_janvier_2014-17.jpg'>Wikimedia user Claude Truong-Ngoc</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>+ 22

Some architects love color, some are unmoved by it, some hate it, and some love to dismiss it as too whimsical or non-serious for architecture. In an essay on the subject, Timothy Brittain-Catlin mentions the “innate puritanism among clients of architecture,” architects and their “embarrassment of confronting color,” and how “Modernism tried to ‘educate out’ bright colors.” So, while the debate on color in architecture is far from being a new one, it is not finished, and probably never will be.

In today’s world where the exhausted stereotype of the no-nonsense architect clad in black still persists, and while we quietly mull over the strange pull of the Cosmic Latte, there are some architects who haven’t been afraid of using broad swathes of color in their work at all. Read on for a list of 7 such exemplary architects both from the past and the present.

121 Definitions of Architecture

There are at least as many definitions of architecture as there are architects or people who comment on the practice of it. While some embrace it as art, others defend architecture’s seminal social responsibility as its most definitive attribute. To begin a sentence with “Architecture is” is a bold step into treacherous territory. And yet, many of us have uttered — or at least thought— “Architecture is…” while we’ve toiled away on an important project, or reflected on why we’ve chosen this professional path.

Most days, architecture is a tough practice; on others, it is wonderfully satisfying. Perhaps, though, most importantly, architecture is accommodating and inherently open to possibility.

This collection of statements illustrates the changing breadth of architecture’s significance; we may define it differently when talking among peers, or adjust our statements for outsiders.

Richard Rogers Wins the 2019 AIA Gold Medal

Richard Rogers has been awarded the 2019 AIA Gold Medal by the American Institute of Architects. The world-renowned architect and founding principal of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners has been recognized “for his influence on the built environment [that] has redefined an architect’s responsibilities to society.”

Honoring “an individual or pair of architects whose significant body of work has had a lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture,” the AIA Gold Medal is often considered the highest honor awarded in the United States for architecture.

NEO Bankside. Image © Edmund Sumner3 World Trade Center. Image Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + PartnersThe Leadenhall Building. Image © Richard Bryant – Courtesy of British Land/Oxford PropertiesY-Cube. Image © Grant Smith+ 7

The 30 Most Influential Architects in London

As a “global capital,” London is home to some of the world’s most influential people, architects included. This fact has recently been laid bare by the London Evening Standard newspaper, whose list of the 1000 most influential Londoners features 30 architects, big and small, who use the city as a base for producing some of the world’s most celebrated architectural works.

Below, we have rounded up the 30 most influential architects in London, complete with examples of the architectural works which have put them on the city and world map.

 by Nigel Young by Rob Parrish by Darren Bradley by Iwan Baan+ 31

Harvard GSD Announces 2019 Richard Rogers Fellowship Cycle

Harvard University Graduate School of Design has announced the 2019 Richard Rogers Fellowship cycle. Open to accomplished practitioners and scholars working in fields related to the built environment, the research-focused residency program is based in London at the Wimbledon House, designed by Lord Richard Rogers in the late 1960s. Fellows have researched a diverse series of topics, including examinations of public and affordable housing; how food and cooking transform cities; and citizen-driven urban regeneration initiatives, among others.

Nike Unveils Air Max Edition Inspired by the Centre Pompidou

Nike has announced that it will release a special edition of its Air Max 1 range, inspired by the iconic Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. The special edition pays tribute to the Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano-designed structure, which is credited by designer Tinker Hatfield as the inspiration behind his original Air Max 1 range.

Two upcoming editions of the Air Max 1 will honor the building, with colored tubes appearing along the seams and lines of the fabric, as well as the sole. A large P logo on the translucent sole offers a further tribute to the controversial structure, opened in 1977.

© Nike via Sneaker News© Nike via Sneaker News© Nike via Sneaker News© Nike via Sneaker News+ 12

Manuel Zornoza of LATITUDE: "We Were Fascinated by this Idea - How do You Build a City from Scratch?"

Manuel N. Zornoza grew up in Alicante, Spain and, following studies in Madrid (UAX) and London (the AA), relocated to China in 2010 to avoid the economic crisis stifling architectural work in his home country. Over the last eight years, the young architect’s small but thriving studio has built more than a dozen projects, from shops, to factory space conversions, to a traditional Chinese hutong - all in China. But that’s not to say Zornoza’s left his roots behind. He now also maintains a small practice in Madrid, which handles projects in both China and Spain.

This interview was conducted on a bullet train ride from Beijing to Tianjin, where we ventured in search of the recent architecture that has brought so much media attention to this emerging metropolis.

Courtesy of LATITUDE© Shannon Fagan. Image Courtesy of LATITUDECourtesy of LATITUDECourtesy of LATITUDE+ 17

Rogers Stirk Harbour, HASSELL, and Weston Williamson Design Five Metro Stations for Melbourne

VA Australia’s Minister for Transport has unveiled designs for five new underground metro stations in the city of Melbourne, designed by a collaborative team comprising HASSELL, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, and Weston Williamson. Scheduled to open in 2025, the new stations will “combine functionality, space and natural light with the latest in public transport infrastructure design.”

The new stations, named North Melbourne, Parkville, State Liberty, Town Hall and Anzac, will each draw on an individual surrounding character to inform their architectural style. The schemes will also include public amenities such as parks, bicycle facilities, and community plazas.

North Melbourne Station. Image Courtesy of Metro Tunnel, via HASSELL, RSHP, Weston WilliamsonNorth Melbourne Station. Image Courtesy of Metro Tunnel, via HASSELL, RSHP, Weston WilliamsonNorth Melbourne Station. Image Courtesy of Metro Tunnel, via HASSELL, RSHP, Weston WilliamsonParkville Station. Image Courtesy of Metro Tunnel, via HASSELL, RSHP, Weston Williamson+ 16

First Images Released of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners' Toronto "HUB" Tower

The scheme is set to be a dominant fixture on the Toronto skyline. Image Courtesy of RSHP
The scheme is set to be a dominant fixture on the Toronto skyline. Image Courtesy of RSHP

London-based Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners has released the first images of their 1.4-million-square-foot (130,000-square-meter) commercial tower for Toronto, Canada. Having won an international competition for the design of “The HUB” in 2017, the RSHP scheme has progressed with the potential to become a dominant fixture on the Toronto skyline.

Harvard Announces Winners of 2018 Richard Rogers Fellowships

Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) has announced the six recipients of their 2018 Richard Rogers Fellowship program. Inspired by Lord Richard Rogers’ “commitment to cross-disciplinary investigation and engagement,” the Fellowship established last year to support individuals “whose research will be enhanced by access to London’s extraordinary institutions, libraries, practices, professionals, and other unique resources.”

The six winners will be given the opportunity to live and research at the Wimbledon House in London, which was designed by Rogers for his parents in the late 1960s. In 2015, Rogers gifted the home to Harvard for Fellowship use. This year’s winners will receive a three-month residency as well as travel expenses to London and $10,000 cash.

Graham Stirk On His Career Of Iconic Designs As Part Of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

In an exclusive half-hour interview with Graham Stirk, partner at Richard Rogers' London-based practice RSHP (Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners), Monocle's Tom Edwards dives into discussing the complexity of some of the practice’s recent projects. Stirk is best known for designing some of the firm's iconic London buildings, such as the Leadenhall Building (or “Cheesegrater”) and the more controversial NEO Bankside.