NEO Bankside / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

© Edmund Sumner

Architects: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Location: Tate Modern, Bankside, Borough of Southwark, , UK
Landscape Architects: Gillespies
Year: 2012
Photographs: Edmund Sumner, Spring & Mercer LLP, , Gillespies

NEO Bankside comprises 217 residential units in four hexagonal pavilions ranging from 12 to 24 storeys and a six-storey office block, located next to the Tate Modern, one of the most visited museums in the world.

Site Plan

All the buildings of the scheme take their cues from the immediate context and it is the quality of the entire ensemble – rather than the individual parts – which creates drama.  The overall design hints at the former industrial heritage of the area during the 19th and 20th centuries, responding in a contemporary language which reinterprets the colouration and materials of the local architectural character. The steel and glass pavilions fit perfectly into the Bankside landscape; oxide reds of the Winter Gardens echo those of Tate Modern and nearby Blackfriars Bridge, while the exterior’s timber clad panels and window louvres give the building a warm, residential feeling.

The pavilions’ distinctive external bracing system has removed the need for internal structural walls and created highly flexible spaces inside the apartments.  The bracing is located outside of the cladding plane allowing it to be expressed as the distinct and legible system which gives the scheme much of its charismatic language. Glazed lift towers provide all occupants great views of London and the river, and a dynamic expression of the vertical circulation on the eastern side of each building.  Winter gardens are enclosed, single-glazed balconies at the north and south ends of each building, suspended from the main structure on a lightweight deck with large sliding screens. They act both as enclosed terraces and additions to the interior living space.

© Spring & Mercer LLP

A generous public realm is also created at ground level with landscaped groves defining two clear public routes through the site connecting the riverside gardens outside Tate Modern through to Southwark Street.  The permeability through the site was a key driver of the design and the imaginative arrangement of the pavilions provides residents with generous accommodation and maximum daylight.

© Gillespies

Landscape designers Gillespies has created a series of richly-detailed garden spaces around the footprint of the apartment pavilions.  The final landscape features soft planting inspired by native woodlands, balancing beautifully with the contemporary lines of the buildings. Unusually in the heart of a city, the outdoor spaces offer NEO Bankside’s residents opportunities to engage with nature, and create a new micro-ecological environment in this established urban setting. The elegant and peaceful landscaped gardens integrate NEO Bankside with the neighbouring Tate Modern and its surroundings, and provide public access during the day as well as a secure, private environment for residents to enjoy.

© Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Gillespies’ landscape design was developed to provide optimum private residents’ gardens, while separating them distinctly from the public routes. An innovative landscape strategy was introduced from the outset to define the threshold between private and publically-accessible spaces.  This definition has been achieved through the use of richly-planted berms, pebble-lined moats, stone-lined cuttings and narrow walkways that combine to create a strong sense of identity for the site. The long planted berms are a recurring signature that channel North/ South movement and act as a threshold between private and public space, dissected by a network of residents’ pathways. The berms also complement Tate Modern’s landscape, binding this site into its wider context.

Diagram

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* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "NEO Bankside / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners" 07 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 17 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=315590>

6 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Is a pity that has no images from the entrance of the tate gallery. I was in London four months ago and I can say that this building is incredible (and too expensive each apartment, LOL)

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Good proportions and nice to see a developer driven project where an inner city site is not over developed

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    NOT OVER DEVELOPED Baz? you obviously haven’t seen this development where the public realm has been fenced off, the public footpath closed and the concept alien to its environment and ignorant of the urban grain. This is ‘copy paste’ architecture from what was once the greatest practice in the world. Heroic architecture looks great on this web site but cities are much more complicated than a one line gag.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    This is a great project on many levels. The architecture is both novel and rational (a rare combination), both fresh and refined. I wondered for a second whether the elevators could have been placed so as to give the units the most prominent view corridors, but I think the final product justifies the compromises that led to it. Well done.

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