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3d Modelling: The Latest Architecture and News

Museum Rüsselsheim / Heinrich Böll Architekt

15:00 - 5 May, 2019
Museum Rüsselsheim / Heinrich Böll Architekt, © Thomas Mayer
© Thomas Mayer

© Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer + 14

  • Architects

    Heinrich Böll BDA DWB 
  • Location

    Rüsselsheim, Germany
  • Category

  • Structural Engineer

    Imagine structure, Frankfurt
  • Mechanical Engineer

    ZWP, Wiesbaden
  • Fire Engineering

    BSCON Brandschutzconsult GmbH, Essen
  • Client

    City of Rüsselsheim
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

Soumaya Museum / FR-EE Fernando Romero Enterprise

10:00 - 17 April, 2019
Soumaya Museum / FR-EE Fernando Romero Enterprise, © Rafael Gamo
© Rafael Gamo

© Rafael Gamo                          © Adam Weisman © Adam Weisman © Adam Weisman + 32

Tree House / 6a Architects

17:00 - 14 April, 2019
Tree House  / 6a Architects, © Johan Dehlin
© Johan Dehlin

© Johan Dehlin © Johan Dehlin © Johan Dehlin © Johan Dehlin + 17

  • Architects

  • Location

    United Kingdom
  • Category

  • Project Team

    Stephanie Macdonald, Tom Emerson, John Ross, Alice Colverd, Cécile David
  • Area

    57.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

The Elastic Perspective / NEXT architects

17:00 - 13 April, 2019
The Elastic Perspective / NEXT architects, © Sander Meisner
© Sander Meisner

© Sander Meisner © Sander Meisner © Sander Meisner © Sander Meisner + 13

Curno Public Library and Auditorium / Archea Associati

15:00 - 13 April, 2019
Curno Public Library and Auditorium / Archea Associati, © Pietro Savorelli
© Pietro Savorelli

© Pietro Savorelli © Pietro Savorelli © Pietro Savorelli © Pietro Savorelli + 28

House in Nada / FujiwaraMuro Architects

22:00 - 9 April, 2019
© Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 13

Kiltro House / Supersudaka

12:00 - 26 March, 2019
Kiltro House / Supersudaka, Courtesy of Supersudaka
Courtesy of Supersudaka

Courtesy of Supersudaka Courtesy of Supersudaka Courtesy of Supersudaka © Cristobal Palma / Estudio Palma + 30

  • Architects

    Juan Pablo Corvalán, Gabriel Vergara
  • Location

    Talca, Chile
  • Category

  • Project Team

    Pablo Sepúlveda, Miguel Angel Reyes
  • Engineering

    Cesar Moreira / Sigma Ingenieros
  • Budget

    U$80,000
  • Area

    104.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2008
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architects

16:30 - 25 January, 2019
AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architects

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architects AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architects AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architects AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architects + 12

  • Architects

    Benthem Crouwel Architekten
  • Location

    Almere, The Netherlands
  • Category

  • Area

    65.0 m2
  • Project Year

    1984

AD Classics: Berlin Philharmonic / Hans Scharoun

16:30 - 14 January, 2019
AD Classics: Berlin Philharmonic / Hans Scharoun, © Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
© Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Columbia University Creates 3D-Printed Timber Lookalike with Internal Grain Pattern

11:00 - 7 January, 2019
via Columbia University
via Columbia University

Researchers at New York’s Columbia University have unveiled a method of vibrantly replicating the external and internal structure of materials such as wood using a 3D printer and specialist scanning techniques. While conveying the external profile and patterns of natural objects is tried and tested, a major challenge in the 3D printing industry has been replicating an object’s internal texture.

In their recent study “Digital Wood: 3D Internal Color Texture Mapping” the research team describes how a system of “color and voxel mapping “led to the production of a 3D printed closely resembling the texture of olive wood, including a cut-through section.

via Columbia University via Columbia University via Columbia University via Columbia University + 6

AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham

22:00 - 27 October, 2018
AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham, © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York
© Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York

This article was originally published on May 25, 2015. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Before the impossibly “super-thin” tower became ubiquitous on the Midtown Manhattan skyline, Raimund Abraham’s Austrian Cultural Forum challenged the limits of what could be built on the slenderest of urban lots. Working with a footprint no bigger than a townhouse (indeed, one occupied the site before the present tower), Abraham erected a daring twenty-four story high-rise only twenty-five feet across. Instantly recognizable by its profile, a symmetrical, blade-like curtain wall cascading violently toward the sidewalk, ACFNY was heralded by Kenneth Frampton as “the most significant modern piece of architecture to be realized in Manhattan since the Seagram Building and the Guggenheim Museum of 1959.” [1]

The massing of the building is dictated solely by zoning laws and the immediacy of its neighbors. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York The director's office that occupies the box-like protrusion on the southern facade. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York East-facing section with the "scissor stairs" on the left-hand side + 7

Tonkin Liu Create Innovative Medical Device using their Signature Shell Lace Structure

09:00 - 16 October, 2018
Tonkin Liu Create Innovative Medical Device using their Signature Shell Lace Structure, Courtesy of Tonkin Liu
Courtesy of Tonkin Liu

Anna Liu and Mike Tonkin of London-based Tonkin Liu have developed an innovative medical device for use in patients’ windpipes. The prototype stent is based on the firm’s signature Shell Lace Structure, a “single-surface structural technology designed and developed through a decade of research for architectural and engineering applications.”

The 3D-printed prototype is 500 times smaller than those used by the firm for their architectural applications and was developed in collaboration with Arup and the Natural History Museum.

Courtesy of Tonkin Liu Courtesy of Tonkin Liu Courtesy of Tonkin Liu Courtesy of Tonkin Liu + 10

AD Classics: Villa dall'Ava / OMA

22:00 - 3 October, 2018
AD Classics: Villa dall'Ava / OMA, © Peter Aaron (OTTO)
© Peter Aaron (OTTO)

This article was originally published on November 13, 2013. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Much of the spatial composition of the Villa dall'Ava was influenced by its site, in a garden on a hill. It was completed in 1991 in the residential area of Saint-Cloud, overlooking Paris. The clients selected OMA to design a house with two distinct apartments—one for themselves and another for their daughter—and requested a swimming pool on the roof with a view of the Eiffel Tower.

© Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA + 21

Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi

03:00 - 21 June, 2018
Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi, Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Palazzetto dello sport. Image © Flickr user ihavegotthestyle licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known as both an architect and an engineer, Pier Luigi Nervi (June 21, 1891 – January 9, 1979) explored the limitations of reinforced concrete by creating a variety of inventive structural projects; in the process, he helped to show the material had a place in architecture movements of the coming years. Nervi began his career in a time of technological revolution, and through his ambition and ability to recognize opportunity in the midst of challenge, he was able to have an impact on several disciplines and cultures.

How To Create An Architecture Portfolio in Virtual Reality

09:00 - 11 February, 2018
How To Create An Architecture Portfolio in Virtual Reality, Cortesía de SentioVR
Cortesía de SentioVR

A portfolio is the standard way for architects to show their work  and their style, process and brand. Over the last decade, portfolios have evolved from paper to digital, primarily because it is more time and cost efficient to maintain a digital portfolio and keep it up-to-date.

Within the realm of digital portfolios, choices can range between an app, a PDF, to a web-hosted portfolio. Architects usually choose to use JPEGs as the main element of the portfolio and may add text or other digital media like video or audio.

However, with the increasing use of new technologies like Virtual Reality to present architectural work - there is a strong case for creating and maintaining an immersive VR portfolio of your work to differentiate your brand in front of your audience and embrace newer technologies.

10 Models Which Show the Power of Point Cloud Scans, As Selected by Sketchfab

09:30 - 9 November, 2016
10 Models Which Show the Power of Point Cloud Scans, As Selected by Sketchfab, via Sketchfab
via Sketchfab

Traditional 3D models made up of surfaces have for a long time aided us in visualizing buildings and spaces, but they often come at a cost: large models require a lot of storage and processing power, and can become incredibly complex to the point where they are difficult to navigate. As a part of our Selected by Sketchfab series, Sketchfab has their eye on a more efficient, increasingly common method of capturing architectural spaces; namely, point clouds. Point clouds are made up of a set of points located in a three-dimensional coordinate system, that when put together merely give an impression of the surface of an object, or the façade of a building.

The method is fairly simple. The collection of data points is generated by a 3D scanner that rotates while emitting a laser that measures the distance to points on surrounding surfaces. This data can then be converted into a polygonal model that can be rendered like any other 3D model. However, the advantages of keeping the scan in point form are what makes it great; the file sizes are much smaller, and the porosity of the point clouds make it possible to see through walls and surfaces, accessing "hidden" spaces and uncommon views of seemingly familiar surroundings. Read on to find out more about the possibilities and advantages that come with point cloud modelling.

6 Castle Fortresses Across Europe, as Selected by Sketchfab

09:30 - 7 July, 2016
6 Castle Fortresses Across Europe, as Selected by Sketchfab

Today, thanks to our partnership with Sketchfab, we take you on a virtual tour of some of the most breathtaking historic fortresses across Europe. The design of castles and fortress complexes are particularly interesting because of their strategic siting and defense mechanisms. As strongholds of territorial claim, fortress complexes are meant to be self-sustaining in times of conflict and contain not only defense fortifications but a suite of supporting structures such as chapels, schools, and housing. This effectively turns fortress complexes into a village within a village. These richly detailed scans hosted on Sketchfab allow us to see in detail the urban planning strategies of different historic periods and places.

For a more immersive experience, all of these models can be viewed on a virtual reality headset such as Google Cardboard.

Tutorial: Using Vray and Sketchfab to Render and Share Your 3D Models

11:30 - 13 February, 2016

In this tutorial, originally published on the Sketchfab blog as "Sketchfab Archvis workflow based on V‌ray baked textures," Tarek Adhami guides you through the full workflow required to take your 3D Model, render it with Vray and upload to Sketchfab.

In this article I will be talking about my workflow to create a real time rendered 3D scene in Sketchfab based on Vray realistic lights and textures.

It does not matter what software you use to model your objects since what I am going to show you can be applied to other applications that Vray (or any similar rendering plugin) can support. In this example I used 3ds Max and Marvelous Designer for modeling and Vray for lighting and texturing.