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Future: The Latest Architecture and News

Holography: How It Could Change Architectural Space

Although holograms have been a possibility for decades—the first hologram was developed in the early 1960’s following the development of laser technology—many might still associate them more with science fiction, the term conjuring up images of high-tech superhero gadgets and spaceships in the distant future. Yet as we inch closer to the reality of a hyper-technologized future, and a variety of industries—including architecture and construction— begin to embrace new forms of increasingly advanced technology, holography, too, has a chance of completely reshaping the way we conceptualize and experience architecture. While it is impossible to predict exactly how holographic technology will be used in the future, below, we list several examples of existing projects that use holograms and other types of holography to create atmospheric environments, fantastical scenes, and practical visualizations. These examples move beyond the use of holograms to visualize structures and sites during the design phase; they utilize holography to shape the completed architectural space itself, completely altering the sensory and spatial experience of their environment.

An Optimist’s Take on AI and the Future of Architecture

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Martin C. Pedersen discusses with Frank Stasiowski, the founder and president of PSMJ Resources, his take on AI and the future of the profession. The author explains that six years ago he "interviewed Frank Stasiowski, the founder and president of PSMJ Resources, a management consulting firm that specializes in architecture, engineering, and construction firms. In addition to advising firms on strategic and growth planning, leadership and succession plans, mergers and acquisitions, and a host of other issues, Stasiowski spends a lot of his time analyzing where the industry is likely to evolve in the future, especially as technology takes an increasingly important role". Finding him one of the keenest observers of the industry, Pedersen talked to Stasiowski to get his opinion on AI and the future of the architectural profession.

Architecture post COVID-19: the Profession, the Firms, and the Individuals

As the world is slowly reopening, easing lockdown measures, everyone is adapting to new realities. Imposing drastic adjustments to our lives, the coronavirus has introduced a new “normal”, changing our perceptions and altering our priorities. Driven towards questioning and evaluating our environment, we are constantly reacting and anticipating a relatively unknown future.

A casual conversation between two editors at ArchDaily generated this collaborative piece that seeks to investigate the current trends, predict the future, and offer insights to everyone/everything related to the architectural field. Tackling the evolution of the profession, the firms, and the individuals, especially young adults and students, this article, produced by Christele Harrouk and Eric Baldwin, aims to reveal what is happening in the architecture scene.

Thriving Through Challenging Times

With the current economic volatility and a looming recession, this conference brings together the brightest business minds in our profession to provide you with insights, guidance and tactics to not only survive the next few months, but thrive.  AIA Houston invites you to participate in an exciting two days of virtual learning. The conference will educate and inform architects on tools and strategies to navigate the current global crisis and anticipate the new normal beyond.

The Cause of Wonder and Worry Over Digital Cities Post Virus

The disruption caused by the coronavirus may have opened doors that many have been waiting for. Preliminary studies support that we experienced a faster technological revolution during the last three months than ever before. Forced to adapt, and to ensure the liveability of urban fabrics, policymakers are reviewing data protocols and legislations, giving way to tech-powered urban health solutions. However, many of those amendments will stay post virus. The precedence gained as a legacy will offer cause for both wonder and worry for our urban future. 

Introducing an Illustrated Series: Architecture and Cities Post-virus

Yesterday, on the 20th of April, we passed the cap of 111 days of the pandemic. During this time, we’ve been busy fighting in supermarket aisles over toilet paper in Australia, lining up for marijuana purchases in Amsterdam and boosting gun demand in the USA. We are conscious none of those will help in fighting the virus, but we do it, nonetheless. Beyond the bizarre human psyche, this pandemic unveils interesting trends that will, whether we like it or not, impact on Architecture and Cities. 

The Future of the Old: How Ancient Construction Techniques are Being Updated

While technology and construction have progressed rapidly in recent years, allowing structures to be built taller and faster than ever, remnants of colossal ancient monuments remind us that construction techniques from as long as hundreds of years ago had enormous merit as well. In fact, many of the innovations of antiquity serve as foundations of modern construction, with the Roman invention of concrete serving as a cogent example. Other essential ancient construction techniques, such as the arch and the dome, are now often considered stylistic flourishes, with designs like the Met Opera House reinterpreting classical typologies in a modern context. Yet perhaps the most relevant reinterpretations of ancient construction today are those that do so in the interest of sustainability, renouncing high-energy modern construction methods in favor of older, more natural techniques.

DesignTO Symposium: A Future without Work

DesignTO’s fifth annual symposium brings nine multidisciplinary experts into one room for an inspiring discussion on a Future without Work, covering topics such as the Indigenous workforce, meaning of work, space of work, labour markets, economic systems, and other thought provoking topics. Hear from Jonas Altman, Antonio Cesare Iadarola, Komal Faiz, Carol Anne Hilton, Keith Jones, Symon Oliver, Heather Russek, Jessica Thornton, and Lexi Tsien. Supported by George Brown College School of Design and Gensler.

Superscape 2020

Superscape 2020

Population growth, increasing urbanisation and social change pose new challenges for architecture and urban planning. Reflecting these processes of change, Superscape opens a creative space for unconventional ideas meant to deliver new impulses to real-life architectural output and urban development. The biennial prize seeks to encourage innovative and visionary architectural concepts that explore new models of living and strategies for inhabiting an urban context over a broad expanse of 30 years.
www.superscape.at/eng/

MIXED-USE CITY
Living, Working and Urban Production

Like the earlier industrial revolution, it is now the digital revolution that is influencing social, economic and socio-cultural processes and, hence, making increased demands

Will Technology Replace Architects? Artist Sebastian Errazuriz Explains Why "Architects Will Need To Find New Jobs"

Joris Laarman for MX3d
Joris Laarman for MX3d

Will architects be one of the professionals who will be replaced by AI in the near future? New York-based artist Sebastián Errázuriz recently opened the debate in one of his latest Instagram videos.

Errázuriz, also known for his critique/proposal of the reconstruction of the Notre-Dame church, says that it is very likely that the future of the profession as we know it might disappear. Thanks to technological advancements, only a small elite of architects who maintain architecture as an artistic practice might be the ones who will continue to practice the discipline as we know it.

Foresight - AA Visiting School Stuttgart

Never before have there been such fundamental uncertainties about our future. Obvious signs of climate change, a political landscape in flux, rapid advances in technology and their consequential societal changes are making us anxious about our personal life in the next decades.

The Laboratory is a cross-disciplinary initiative that brings together architects, artists, designers and researchers to speculate about the near future through an exploration of our social, cultural, spatial and technological present. What could the impact be onto our shared future? Avoiding dystopia, the workshop aims to come up with productive narratives about the future that try to

7 Houses of the Future - According to the Past

It is often claimed that “there is nothing more outdated than science fiction.” Indeed, history is awash with speculation on future ways of living, as futurists imagine how advancements in technology, trends, and social norms could alter how we live, and what we live in. The period between 1958 and 1963 could be described as “The Golden Age of American Futurism” where technological milestones such as the founding of NASA coincided with cultural icons such as The Jetsons. Some of this era’s wildest ideas centered on how the houses of the future would look.

Space Houses (1960s). Image © Angie's ListGlass Houses (1920s). Image © Angie's ListMoving Houses (1920s). Image © Angie's ListUnderwater Houses (1960s). Image © Angie's List+ 8

Athenaeum - of World Architecture ’20: Brazil

Introduction

Architects are not endowed with designing just buildings but with time, they are now building ecosystems. This expanded role of architecture is becoming more and more evident with the passing century, where the profession found itself from making enclosures for functions, to defining how the functions would be.
As we enter into the 2020, these changing definitions are becoming more noticeable. As architecture evolves these themes continuously shift with amazing trails behind.
And this, in context of South American subcontinent looks more real than ever.

Framing the world capital architecture as a place of dialogue, the time to build architecture for architecture