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The Vibrant Colors and Details of Argentine Architecture in 100 Minimalist Photographs

08:00 - 17 June, 2017
The Vibrant Colors and Details of Argentine Architecture in 100 Minimalist Photographs, Cortesía de @hernanmat
Cortesía de @hernanmat

The textures, colors, and details, captured by @hernanmat in these minimalist photographs, show the vibrancy of the patterns and elements characteristic of the local, traditional and popular architecture of Argentina.

By photographing and compiling all these elements into one place, the collection becomes in a way a reflection of the different components of Argentine architecture that occupy the collective memory.

Check out below a stunning selection of minimalist photographs by @hernanmat.

Photographed: Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines' Solar-Powered Seine Musicale

08:00 - 5 June, 2017
© Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia
© Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia

Photographer duo Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia have released a new photo series capturing the Seine Musicale, which recently opened its doors. Designed as a partnership itself between architects Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines, the mixed-use music and cultural center is located in Paris’ western Boulogne-Billancourt suburb. The project is the latest feature in the site’s Island Master Plan designed by Jean Nouvel. Features include a multi-purpose concert hall seating 4,000, a classical music call seating 1,150, rehearsal and recording rooms and an outdoor park area for visitors and practicing musicians. 

© Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia © Luc Boegly & Sergio Grazia +54

Korean Curiosity: Is Seoul Experiencing a "Neo-Brutalist Revival"?

09:30 - 25 April, 2017
© Raphael Olivier
© Raphael Olivier

During his frequent travels to Seoul, Hong Kong- and Singapore-based photographer Raphael Olivier noticed a new trend taking the South Korean capital: a crop of geometric, concrete buildings of all genres. He calls the new style Neo-Brutalism, after the modernist movement that proliferated in the late 1950s to 1970s, in which raw concrete was meant to express a truth and honesty. Olivier's observation led him to capture the phenomenon in a personal photo series—a photographic treasure trove of these projects which, when taken as a whole, uncovers a cross-section of this trend in the city's architecture.

© Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier +19

Sketches of Spain: Hidden Spanish Architecture Through Ola Kolehmainen's Lenses

16:00 - 23 April, 2017
Sketches of Spain: Hidden Spanish Architecture Through Ola Kolehmainen's Lenses, House of Spiritual Retreat. Image © Ola Kolehmainen. Courtesy of the SENDA Gallery
House of Spiritual Retreat. Image © Ola Kolehmainen. Courtesy of the SENDA Gallery

The exhibition 'Sketches of Spain' by photographer Ola Kolehmainen has been recently shown in Barcelona at the SENDA Gallery. The exhibition summarized the last ten years of Kolehmainen’s work. In 2015, the artist was awarded the RIBA Honorary Fellowship for his contribution in promoting the architecture of his generation. 

With his particular vision, Ola Kolehmainen seeks to show the constant abstractions that are partially hidden in modern architecture. His photography is dramatic and inspiring, we can find pieces of European avant-garde mixed with the crudeness of the materials and their uses. With minimal format, he shows us details we normally miss completely from well-known works such as the Barcelona Pavilion by Mies Van der Rohe (key architect in Kolehmainen's work), or the Niemeyer Center in Avilés, by Oscar Niemeyer

Less is more. Image © Ola Kolehmainen. Courtesy of the SENDA Gallery Red Staircase 2. Image © Ola Kolehmainen. Courtesy of the SENDA Gallery Ein Hauch II. Image © Ola Kolehmainen. Courtesy of the SENDA Gallery Ein Hauch III. Image © Ola Kolehmainen. Courtesy of the SENDA Gallery +12

45 Years of Architecture Model Photography in Spain

12:00 - 16 April, 2017
45 Years of Architecture Model Photography in Spain, International Design Competition for the José Batlle y Ordóñez Monument in Montevideo (Uruguay), 1959. Architect: Roberto Puig Álvarez. Sculptor: Jorge Oteiza. Image © Photographic Library of the Spanish Cultural Heritage Institute, Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. Oteiza Museum Archives
International Design Competition for the José Batlle y Ordóñez Monument in Montevideo (Uruguay), 1959. Architect: Roberto Puig Álvarez. Sculptor: Jorge Oteiza. Image © Photographic Library of the Spanish Cultural Heritage Institute, Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. Oteiza Museum Archives

138 images, 14 albums, 20 magazines, 13 original models and one projection are part of Modeling for the Camera: Photography of architectural models in Spain, 1925-1970, the current exhibition of the ICO Museum in Madrid, curated by Iñaki Bergera, PhD of Architecture from the University of Navarra.

The exhibition is tied to the book of the same name that was published in 2016, edited by La Fábrica and the Ministry of Public Works (Spain). In times when 3D visualization software has popularized, accelerated and perfected the rendering industry, both materials choose to value the legacy of architectural model photography in the 20th century.

Club Táchira, Caracas (Venezuela), 1956. Architects: Eduardo Torroja Miret and José Fructoso Vivas Vivas. Image © Modern construction archives- Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Alberto Sartoris. © García Moya Preliminary design outdoor gazebo for music band. National Prize of Architecture, 1962. Architect: Juan Daniel Fullaondo Errazu. Image © Paco Gómez Archive / Foto Colectania Foundation Headquarters of JORBA Laboratories, Madrid, 1965. Architect: Miguel Fisac ​​Serna. Image © C. Jiménez. Fisac ​​Foundation Torres Blancas, Madrid, 1969. Architect: Francisco Javier Sáenz de Oiza. Image © Collection Architectural College of Catalonia Historical Archives. Photography: L. Jiménez +15

The Singularity of the Skyscraper: Studies in Form and Façade

04:00 - 11 April, 2017
The Singularity of the Skyscraper: Studies in Form and Façade, New York. Image © Florian W. Mueller
New York. Image © Florian W. Mueller

Florian W. Mueller's Singularity series is, in the photographer's own words, "just the building – reduced to the max." These deceptively simple shots of the summits of skyscrapers from around Europe and North America, each set against in infinite gradient of sky, are symbols of architecture's effort to reach ever higher in evermore unique ways. For Mueller, who is based in Cologne, they are an attempt at abstraction. In isolation—and especially when viewed together—they are remarkably revealing as studies of form and façade.

Cologne. Image © Florian W. Mueller Hong Kong. Image © Florian W. Mueller Hamburg. Image © Florian W. Mueller London. Image © Florian W. Mueller +21

Experience Renzo Piano's Valletta City Gate Through This Captivating Photo Series

14:00 - 9 April, 2017

Within the framework of the recent election of Malta to the Presidency of the Council of the European Union—a position that will be held through June 2017—architectural photographer Danica O. Kus has created a photo series detailing Renzo Piano Building Workshop’s Valletta City Gate in Malta.

Completed in 2014, the project is composed of four parts: the Valletta City Gate and site, an open-air theater “machine,” a Parliament building, and landscaped space. Experience the project in beautiful detail though the photo series, after the break.

© Danica O. Kus Photography © Danica O. Kus Photography © Danica O. Kus Photography © Danica O. Kus Photography +22

Santiago Calatrava's City of Arts and Sciences Through the Lens of Photographer Sebastian Weiss

09:30 - 9 April, 2017
Santiago Calatrava's City of Arts and Sciences Through the Lens of Photographer Sebastian Weiss, © Sebastian Weiss Photography
© Sebastian Weiss Photography

As a young boy, Santiago Calatrava's fascination with light in his native Valencia fueled his determination to draw, design, and eventually build. His Ciudad de Artes y Ciencias (City of Arts and Sciences) is a perfect example of the influence of the Valencian sun on the architect's work. The seven cultural buildings define a formal vocabulary all their own, with a dynamism between blanched curves and rhythmic visual patterns. So bright it almost glows on clear days, the materiality of the structures emphasizes the ability of light to outline the spatial relationships between Calatrava's shapes, and shift them as the sun moves through the sky.

In his most recent photo series, Sebastian Weiss has captured the tendency of the shapes of the City of Arts and Sciences to "complement each other and even merge to a harmonic unity," as the photographer himself puts it. The photos were originally featured on his Instagram, @le_blanc, and develop a new way of looking at the oft-photographed tourist spot. His images imagine the complex as a pulsating "light-space installation" of equally systematic and creature-like forms in constant conversation with one another. The series gives the sense of looking at different sections of a particularly beautiful beast—its ribs, underbelly, horns, etc.—captured within the complex's shallow pools.

© Sebastian Weiss Photography © Sebastian Weiss Photography © Sebastian Weiss Photography © Sebastian Weiss Photography +17

Boa Nova Tea House by Alvaro Siza Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

08:00 - 8 April, 2017

The following photo set by Fernando Guerra focuses on Boa Nova Tea House, a project by Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira. Completed in 1963, it was one of the first works done by the 1992 Pritzker Prize winner. Built on the rocks that hang over the sea in Leça da Palmeira, the tea house is in close proximity to another iconic project by the same architect, the Leça Swimming Pools, both classified as National Monuments in Portugal. 

These Photographs Capture the Opulent Beauty of Empty Moscow Metro Stations

12:15 - 29 March, 2017

Known as one of the world’s grandest subway systems, the Moscow Metro is filled with materials more commonly associated with palaces or museums – marble and granite walls, bronze columns, and lavish chandeliers are just a few of the opulent textures you’ll find beneath the streets of Russia’s largest city.

Despite their renown, the Moscow government almost never allows professional photographers to capture the beauty of the stations. But in 2014, photographer David Burdney was finally given that opportunity. Visiting the system late at night after the metro had closed, Burdney was able to capture each station in its best light, and completely devoid of people.

International Photography Competition "Cities Without Architecture”

19:30 - 13 March, 2017
International Photography Competition "Cities Without Architecture”, Courtesy of Arquitectura Sin Fronteras
Courtesy of Arquitectura Sin Fronteras

The main objective of this competition is to select a photograph which will be the main image for a sensibilization campaign named "Cities Without Architecture" alerting to the need of working towards the improvement of the habitat.

A -Theme Area

According to the Un-Habitat (United Nations) Urban Observatory, it is estimated that fifty million people will move from rural areas to the cities in western Africa over the next ten years. In Mumbay, the population has recorded a four-fold increase. Half of the population live in slums, 700.000 spend the night on the streets, 100 million people in the world, mostly kids, have no permanent home.

More than half a century has passed already since Bernanrd Rudofsky exhibited at the New York MOMA a collection of pictures he took during his trips. The exhibition would be named: Architecture Without Architect. This exhibition was shown in more than 80 cities during the following 11 years, and its catalog has become a true referent in what has been called vernacular architecture.

A question arises nowadays: what have architects learned from this famous Architecture Without Architects? But these days there is an even more important question: how much aware are we in the developed countries of the existence of cities without architecture?

These Images of Abandoned Insane Asylums Show Architecture That Was Designed to Heal

09:30 - 8 March, 2017
These Images of Abandoned Insane Asylums Show Architecture That Was Designed to Heal, Courtesy of Matt Van der Velde
Courtesy of Matt Van der Velde

With cracked paint, overgrown vines, rust, and decay, abandoned buildings have carved out a photographic genre that plays to our complex fascination with the perverse remnants of our past. While intellectual interest in ruins has been recorded for centuries, the popularity and controversy of contemporary "ruin porn" can be traced back to somewhere around 2009, when photographer James Griffioen’s feral houses series sparked a conversation about the potential harm in the aesthetic appropriation of urban collapse.

A favorite subject within this field is the American insane asylum, whose tragic remains carry echoes of the unsavory history of mental illness treatment in the United States. These state-funded asylums were intensely overcrowded and often housed patients in nightmarish conditions in the 20th century. Beginning in 1955, with the introduction of the antipsychotic drug Thorazine, these institutions were closed in large numbers, never to be reopened [1]. Now, these closed but un-demolished asylums that dot the country are the subject of "ruin porn" that neglects an equally important piece of the buildings’ narrative: the beginning. In his recent photobook Abandoned Asylums, Photographer Matt Van der Velde depicts this earlier period of asylum architecture, when the institutions were built in the belief that the built environment has the power to cure.

Courtesy of Matt Van der Velde Courtesy of Matt Van der Velde Courtesy of Matt Van der Velde Courtesy of Matt Van der Velde +61

RCR Arquitectes' Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library, Photographed by Pedro Kok

14:00 - 3 March, 2017
RCR Arquitectes' Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library, Photographed by Pedro Kok, Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library / RCR Arquitectes. Image © Pedro Kok
Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library / RCR Arquitectes. Image © Pedro Kok

Following the announcement on Wednesday of the winners of the 2017 Pritzker Prize, which was awarded to architects Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes, architectural photographer Pedro Kok has shared with us a series of photographs of the Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library, located in Barcelona, Spain.

As with many of the Catalan trio's work, the library stands out for its materiality and careful construction, making intense use of transparency and light.

Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library / RCR Arquitectes. Image © Pedro Kok Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library / RCR Arquitectes. Image © Pedro Kok Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library / RCR Arquitectes. Image © Pedro Kok Sant Antoni - Joan Oliver Library / RCR Arquitectes. Image © Pedro Kok +10

Norbert Juhász's Portrait of Moroccan Berber Settlements

16:00 - 14 February, 2017
Norbert Juhász's Portrait of Moroccan Berber Settlements, © Norbert Juhász
© Norbert Juhász

In this photo-essay, Norbert Juhász—a Hungarian photographer based in Budapest—presents a study of the Moroccan Berber villages (around Imlil and the surrounding valleys). Located in the High Atlas Mountains, these remote settlements are increasingly connected to the "outside world." In the words of Juhász, "many are now connected to the electrical grid and have some sort of road access." That said, "mules are still a popular form of transport."

© Norbert Juhász © Norbert Juhász © Norbert Juhász © Norbert Juhász +10

The English Cathedral by Peter Marlow

10:04 - 7 February, 2017
The English Cathedral by Peter Marlow, Liverpool Cathedral © Peter Marlow / Magnum Photos
Liverpool Cathedral © Peter Marlow / Magnum Photos

42 photographs representing all 42 cathedrals of the Church of England by Magnum photographer Peter Marlow (1952 – 2016) are to be exhibited in The Lady Chapel at Ely Cathedral. This is only the second time this work has been displayed in one of the spaces featured in the series and the first time the project has been exhibited in this region of the UK.

This Kickstarter Camera Mimics Human Eyesight

16:00 - 4 February, 2017
This Kickstarter Camera Mimics Human Eyesight, via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech
via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech

The team at TwoEyes Tech made up of HunJoo Song, SeonAh Kim, and Vivek Soni has launched a kickstarter campaign for its TwoEyes VR 360 camera, which is the first binocular 360-degree VR, 4K camera that mirrors human eye sight.

Using two pairs of 180-degree lenses that are placed 65 millimeters apart—the average distance between a person’s eyes—the camera captures 360-degree footage, “just like your natural eyes would view the world.” This footage can be uploaded to 360-degree-compatible social media platforms like YouTube 360, Facebook 360, and Twitter 360, or enjoyed through virtual reality binoculars or 3D television.

via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech +5

Take Harvard's Online Course in Digital Photography for Free

06:00 - 16 January, 2017
Take Harvard's Online Course in Digital Photography for Free

If you've always wanted to take better photos and you have 10-15 hours to dedicate to the endeavor, you'll be pleased to know this: Harvard, one of the world's most renowned universities and home to the mighty GSD (Graduate School of Design)—whose faculty has included Rem Koolhaas, Zaha Hadid, Walter Gropius and many others—is offering a free course in digital photography.

Available via ALISON, an online learning community, the course offers 13 modules that promise to teach the basics behind good photography.

Discover Madrid's Geometric Architecture Through This Photo Series

13:00 - 12 January, 2017

Digital Designer and Creative Director Joel Filipe has unveiled Geometry of Madrid Architecture, a series of photographs depicting the bold architecture of Madrid. Through the project, Filipe reveals varying “geometries within minimalist clichés that underline the lines of the buildings.”

Buildings photographed in the series include Ciudad BBVA, by Herzog & de Meuron, Museo ABC, by Aranguren & Gallegos Architects, Hospital Rey Juan Carlos, by Rafael de La-Hoz, and more.  

“This project aims at challenging the viewer by exploring the intimate relationship between architecture and photography,” said Filipe.

Experience the geometry of Madrid, after the break. 

Distrito Telefónica - Rafael de La-Hoz. Image © Joel Filipe Apartamentos en Gran Vía - Madrid. Image © Joel Filipe  Hospital Rey Juan Carlos - Rafael de La-Hoz. Image © Joel Filipe Hospital Rey Juan Carlos - Rafael de La-Hoz. Image © Joel Filipe +22