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Iwan Baan

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE

How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 16 Notable Examples

12:00 - 24 June, 2018
© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking

Cortesía de MAP Cortesía de Project.DWG + LOOS.FM © Lukas Pelech Cortesía de Wang Shu, Amateur Architecture Studio + 34

With the aim of supporting architects to become active agents of sustainable design, this week we present a selection of facades that incorporate different recycled materials. Beyond the typical uses of plastic and glass, in this article, you will find innovative materials such as mattress springs, ice cream containers, plastic chairs, and recycled waste from agricultural and industrial products. A look at 16 remarkable projects using recycled materials to create an attractive facade.

Spotlight: Alejandro Aravena

10:30 - 22 June, 2018
Innovation Center UC - Anacleto Angelini. Image © Nico Saieh
Innovation Center UC - Anacleto Angelini. Image © Nico Saieh

As founder of the “Do Tank” firm ELEMENTAL, Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena (born on June 22, 1967) is perhaps the most socially-engaged architect to receive the Pritzker Prize. Far from the usual aesthetically driven approach, Aravena explains that “We don’t think of ourselves as artists. Architects like to build things that are unique. But if something is unique it can’t be repeated, so in terms of it serving many people in many places, the value is close to zero.” [1] For Aravena, the architect’s primary goal is to improve people's way of life by assessing both social needs and human desires, as well as political, economic and environmental issues.

Spotlight: Smiljan Radić

10:30 - 21 June, 2018
Spotlight: Smiljan Radić,  The Winery at VIK. Image © Cristobal Palma / Estudio Palma
The Winery at VIK. Image © Cristobal Palma / Estudio Palma

Mainly known outside of his home country for his design of the 2014 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, architect Smiljan Radić (born June 21, 1965) is one of the most prominent figures in current Chilean architecture. With a distinctive approach to form, materials, and natural settings, Radić mostly builds small- to medium-sized projects that flirt with the notion of fragility.

2014 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Danica O. Kus Copper House 2. Image © Smiljan Radic Mestizo Restaurant. Image © Smiljan Radic Zwing Bus Stop. Image © Yuri PALMIN + 13

Why Heatherwick Studio's Zeitz MOCAA Is "A Call to Arms" For African Museums

09:30 - 20 June, 2018
© Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

The Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa—or Zeitz MOCAA for short—recently received first place in ArchDaily's Refurbishment in Architecture awards, with its striking design transforming a formerly derelict industrial building into an iconic landmark in South Africa’s oldest working harbor. Developed by the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town and designed by Heatherwick Studio, the mixed-use project is now “the world’s largest museum dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora.” To celebrate the award, we sat down with group leader Matthew Cash to discuss the challenges faced during the project, its cultural importance to Africa, and the practice’s interest in refurbishment as a whole.

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan + 11

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

14:00 - 11 June, 2018
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan + 38

Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London

09:35 - 11 June, 2018
Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The 2018 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, designed by Frida Escobedo, was unveiled today in London's Hyde Park. Escobedo's design, which fuses elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, features a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed from cement roof tiles. These tiles are stacked to form a celosia, a type of wall common to Mexican architecture which is permeable, allowing ventilation and views to the other side.

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 11

CTBUH Reveals Best Tall Building Worldwide and Winners of 2018 Tall Building Awards

12:00 - 4 June, 2018
CTBUH Reveals Best Tall Building Worldwide and Winners of 2018 Tall Building Awards, Oasia Downtown Hotel. Image © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Oasia Downtown Hotel. Image © Patrick Bingham-Hall

The Council on Tall Building and Urban Habitat have announced the winners of the 16th edition of the CTBUH Tall Building Awards. From over 48 finalists in 28 countries, the best buildings from four regions – the Americas, Asia & Australasia, Europe, and Middle East & Africa – were selected, along with recipients of the Urban Habitat Award, the Innovation Award, the Construction Award and the 10 Year Award. From these finalists, the CTBUH has also awarded the Best Tall Building Worldwide to the Oasia Hotel Downtown by WOHA

The towers were chosen by a panel of architects from world-renowned firms and were judged on every aspect of performance, looking in particular for those which “have made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and that achieve sustainability at the highest and broadest level.”

Ground Zero Masterplan. Image © Studio Daniel Libeskind MULTI. Image © thyssenkrupp New York Times Tower. Image © Anthony Wood Oasia Downtown Hotel. Image © Patrick Bingham-Hall + 11

7 Lessons from New York's New Affordable Housing Design Guide

09:30 - 1 June, 2018
7 Lessons from New York's New Affordable Housing Design Guide , Broadway Housing in Santa Monica, by Kevin Daly, was identified by the report as a case study for its circulation. Image © Iwan Baan
Broadway Housing in Santa Monica, by Kevin Daly, was identified by the report as a case study for its circulation. Image © Iwan Baan

When we think of public housing architecture in the United States, we often think of boxes: big, brick buildings without much aesthetic character. But the implications of standardized, florescent-lit high-rises can be far more than aesthetic for the people who live there. Geographer Rashad Shabazz, for one, recalls in his book Spatializing Blackness how the housing project in Chicago where he grew up—replete with chain link fencing, video surveillance, and metal detectors—felt more like a prison than a home. Accounts of isolation, confinement, and poor maintenance are echoed by public housing residents nationwide.

But American public housing doesn’t have to be desolate. A new set of design standards from the New York City Public Design Commission (PDC)—in collaboration with The Fine Arts Federation of New York and the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter—hopes to turn over a new leaf in affordable housing architecture.

Step Up on Fifth in Santa Monica, by Brooks + Scarpa, was identified by the report as a case study for its windows and doors. Image Courtesy of Brooks + Scarpa The Navy Green development in Brooklyn was a key case study in the report. Here, the supportive housing from that development, designed by Architecture in Formation and Curtis + Ginsburg. Image © Tom Powel Imaging The Tetris Apartments in Ljubljana, by OFIS Arhitekti, were identified by the report as a case study for their massing. Image Courtesy of OFIS Arhitekti Creston Avenue Residence in the Bronx. Image Courtesy of MAP Architects + 16

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

01:00 - 1 June, 2018
Spotlight: Toyo Ito, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi Tama Art University Library. Image © Iwan Baan Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc. Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan + 16

LEGO House and Bicycle Snake Honored in 2018 Danish Design Awards

14:00 - 31 May, 2018
LEGO House and Bicycle Snake Honored in 2018 Danish Design Awards, © Kim Christensen / DISSING + WEITLING Architecture
© Kim Christensen / DISSING + WEITLING Architecture

Bjarke Ingels Group’s LEGO House and DISSING + WEITLING’s Bicycle Snake have been recognized by the 2018 Danish Design Awards, an initiative which “highlights the impact and value of design, celebrates companies and designers across the country and showcases the difference their solutions make to industry, everyday life, and society at large.”

The LEGO House was victorious in the “Feel Good” category, while the Bicycle Snake was awarded the “Icon Award.”

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © DISSING + WEITLING Architecture © DISSING + WEITLING Architecture + 7

AIA Announces Winners of 2018 Housing Awards

16:00 - 26 May, 2018
Underhill; Matinecock, New York | Bates Masi + Architects. Image © Michael Moran
Underhill; Matinecock, New York | Bates Masi + Architects. Image © Michael Moran

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) announced the winners of their 18th annual Housing Awards, which recognize the best in housing design for new constructions, restorations, and renovations. This year the five-person jury selected eleven projects to receive awards in four categories: one- and two-family custom residences; one- and two-family production homes; multifamily housing; and specialized housing.

The Bear Stand; Gooderham, Ontario, Canada | Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Image © Nic Lehoux 150 Charles; New York City | COOKFOX Architects, DPC and Alan Wanzenberg Architect & Design. Image © Bilyana Dimitrova South 5th Residence; Austin, Texas | alterstudio architecture. Image © Casey Dunn Mariposa1038; Los Angeles | Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects . Image © Paul Vu + 65

Smiljan Radic Receives the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize 2018

14:00 - 26 May, 2018
Smiljan Radic Receives the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize 2018, Image © Iwan Baan
Image © Iwan Baan

Chilean architect Smiljan Radic was announced the winner of the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize 2018 Architecture Awards from The American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York.

The academy's annual architecture awards program began in 1955 with the opening of the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize. The prize is given to an architect of any nationality who has made a significant contribution to architecture as an art. The program has since been expanded to include four Arts and Literature Awards for American architects that explore ideas in architecture through any medium of expression.

SelgasCano Adds a Splash of Color to the Bruges Triennale with New Installation

08:00 - 16 May, 2018
SelgasCano Adds a Splash of Color to the Bruges Triennale with New Installation, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

In our rapidly changing world where ideologies and forms of life are under threat, history is being disregarded. The 2018 Bruges Triennale proposes one question: “How flexible, liquid, and resilient can a historic city like Bruges be in an age when nothing seems to be certain any longer?” In parallel, the inspiration behind the concept lies in the geography of the city itself. Bruges is a city wrapped and braided with water and has been a metaphor for Liquid City since early times. Till-Holger Borchert and Michel Dewilde, curators of the 2018 Bruges Viennale, have asked artists and architects to translate the city’s fluidity and artistic legacy into picturesque installations, allowing visitors to become part of the creative process.

Rammed Earth Construction: 15 Exemplary Projects

12:00 - 13 May, 2018
© Nic Lehoux Photography
© Nic Lehoux Photography

© Iwan Baan © Stefan Müller © Norman Müller © Filip Dujardin + 19

This week, we're highlighting a selection of the best images of projects built using rammed earth. These 15 works show the attractive aesthetic finish created by the superposition of multiple layers of compressed soil. Despite having been neglected as a construction technique for years, this type of construction is now experiencing a renaissance in architecture. Read on for a selection of images from prominent photographers such as Filip DujardinJoão Morgado, and Nic Lehoux

Toshiko Mori Pursues Dialogue That Transcends Time and Space

08:00 - 12 May, 2018

Continuing their Time-Space-Existence series of monthly videos leading up to this year’s Venice BiennalePLANE—SITE have released a new conversation with architect and former Harvard GSD chair of architecture Toshiko Mori. Each video highlights the ideas that drive the work of well-known designers, with this episode focusing on Mori’s philosophy of visual communication, dialogue with history and considering the future in her work.

Courtesy of Tashiko Mori Architect © Paul Warchol © Hiroshi Abe © Iwan Baan + 15

Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron

06:00 - 8 May, 2018
Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron, VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra
VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra

Led by Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950), most descriptions of Herzog & de Meuron projects are almost paradoxical: in one paragraph they will be praised for their dedication to tradition and vernacular forms, in the next for their thoroughly modern innovation. However, in the hands of Herzog & de Meuron this is no paradox, as the internationally renowned architectural duo combine tradition and innovation in such a way that the two elements actually enhance each other.

VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra 1111 Lincoln Road. Image © Nelson Garrido, Reprinted with permission from MBeach1, LLLP. Parrish Art Museum. Image © Matthu Placek Messe Basel New Hall. Image Courtesy of Messe Basel + 29

8 Biodegradable Materials the Construction Industry Needs to Know About

09:30 - 2 May, 2018
8 Biodegradable Materials the Construction Industry Needs to Know About

In architecture we are so caught up in creating something new, we often forget about what happens at the end of a building’s life cycle—the unfortunate, inevitable demolition. We may want our buildings to be timeless and live on forever, but the harsh reality is that they do not, so where is all the waste expected to go?

As with most non-recyclable waste, it ends up in the landfill and, as the land required for landfill becomes an increasingly scarce resource, we must find an alternative solution. Each year in the UK alone, 70–105 million tonnes of waste is created from demolishing buildings, and only 20% of that is biodegradable according to a study by Cardiff University. With clever design and a better awareness of the biodegradable materials available in construction, it’s up to us as architects to make the right decisions for the entirety of a building’s lifetime.

Firms Like Zaha Hadid Architects Are Revolutionizing Office Design Using Big Data

09:30 - 1 May, 2018
Firms Like Zaha Hadid Architects Are Revolutionizing Office Design Using Big Data, The Analytics and Insight unit at Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has developed data-driven space-planning models for workplaces that can be changed or adapted in real time. The team, led by architect Uli Blum and Arjun Kaicker, applies their research directly to ZHA projects, including the Sberbank Technopark at the Skolkovo Innovation Centre, Moscow, Russia (seen here), and the Galaxy SOHO Beijing, which was built in 2012. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
The Analytics and Insight unit at Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has developed data-driven space-planning models for workplaces that can be changed or adapted in real time. The team, led by architect Uli Blum and Arjun Kaicker, applies their research directly to ZHA projects, including the Sberbank Technopark at the Skolkovo Innovation Centre, Moscow, Russia (seen here), and the Galaxy SOHO Beijing, which was built in 2012. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

This article was originially published by Metropolis Magazine as "Architects, Armed with Data, Are Seeing the Workplace Like Never Before."

A workplace that improves employee productivity and efficiency has been a white whale of corporate managers for decades. But even before the office as we know it today was born, designers and innovators were already studying sites of labor, such as the factory, to devise strategies to boost worker performance. By the 1960s, Robert Propst, the inventor behind Herman Miller’s Action Office line of workplace furniture, and others were conducting workspace research that would ultimately lead to the creation of the modern cubicle.

These developments relied largely on observation and intuition to organize office workers in purportedly effective ways. Now, advances in technology allow designers to take a more sophisticated approach, using sensors, internet-connected furniture and fixtures, and data analytics to study offices in real time. “You can take into account every single employee, and people are very different,” says London architect Uli Blum. “It’s about solving the fundamental problems of getting people the environment they need. And the easiest way is to ask them,” he adds. But finding out the needs of hundreds, sometimes thousands, of workers can quickly become an exercise in futility.