1. ArchDaily
  2. Photography

Photography: The Latest Architecture and News

"My Photographs Are a Celebration of the Making of Things": In Conversation with Christopher Payne

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Christopher Payne’s fascination with factories goes back decades. As an architecture student at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1990s, Payne had the good fortune to find a summer job with an agency inside the National Park Service called the Historic American Buildings Survey. “They sent teams of architecture students, historians, and photographers to document all kinds of projects,” he says. “We documented grain elevators in Buffalo, cast iron bridges in Ohio, a power plant in Alabama, and national parks in Utah. That experience instilled a deep appreciation for industrial architecture.” After graduation, he worked for several years as an architect in New York City before transitioning full-time to photography. His previous books include New York’s Forgotten Substations: The Power Behind the Subway; Asylum: Inside the Closed World of State Mental Hospitals; North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City; and Making Steinway: An American Workplace. Last month, Payne gave the School of Visual Art’s Ralph Caplan Memorial Lecture, and shortly afterward I reached out to him to talk about his most recent book, Made in America (Abrams), his long love affair with factories, and the photographic process.

"My Photographs Are a Celebration of the Making of Things": In Conversation with Christopher Payne - Image 1 of 4"My Photographs Are a Celebration of the Making of Things": In Conversation with Christopher Payne - Image 2 of 4"My Photographs Are a Celebration of the Making of Things": In Conversation with Christopher Payne - Image 3 of 4"My Photographs Are a Celebration of the Making of Things": In Conversation with Christopher Payne - Image 4 of 4My Photographs Are a Celebration of the Making of Things: In Conversation with Christopher Payne - More Images+ 9

Paul Clemence Explores "Architectural Essence" in Latest Photo Exhibition at Le Salon Suisse

In his latest photographic journey, Paul Clemence explores the architectural essence of Swiss Museums at Le Salon Suisse, Miami Art Week. Delving into the architectural artistry of the region and the museum’s significance in today’s urban landscape, the photographer showcases a comprehensive exhibition. Titled “Shapes, Rhythm, Abstraction: Swiss Museums,” the photo series includes Geneva, Lausanne, Basel, Zurich, and St. Gallen.

Paul Clemence Explores "Architectural Essence" in Latest Photo Exhibition at Le Salon Suisse - Image 1 of 4Paul Clemence Explores "Architectural Essence" in Latest Photo Exhibition at Le Salon Suisse - Image 2 of 4Paul Clemence Explores "Architectural Essence" in Latest Photo Exhibition at Le Salon Suisse - Image 3 of 4Paul Clemence Explores "Architectural Essence" in Latest Photo Exhibition at Le Salon Suisse - Image 4 of 4Paul Clemence Explores Architectural Essence in Latest Photo Exhibition at Le Salon Suisse - More Images+ 12

A Ghost City: The White Buildings of Ashgabat, Turkmenistan

Arnau Rovira is a photographer who found himself in Turkmenistan by accident. From Barcelona, he recalls the story of how he found himself in its capital, Ashgabat, accompanying sports journalists for the 2017 Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games. This Central Asian country, a former colony of the USSR, is known not only for its strict access and control restrictions but also for its white and golden structures that create a futuristic city near the border with Iran.

MAD Architects’ Museum of Migration in Rotterdam is Scheduled to Open in 2025

Designed by MAD Architects, the FENIX Museum of Migration is set to be inaugurated in 2025 in Rotterdam’s City Harbor. The purpose of the institution is to showcase and highlight the stories of global migration through encounters with art, architecture, photography, and history. The museum broke ground in 2020 when the first images of the proposal were also released. MAD Architects is working with Bureau Polderman for the restoration of the historic warehouse dating back to 1932, which now represents the base and starting point for the museum experience.

MAD Architects’ Museum of Migration in Rotterdam is Scheduled to Open in 2025 - Image 1 of 4MAD Architects’ Museum of Migration in Rotterdam is Scheduled to Open in 2025 - Featured ImageMAD Architects’ Museum of Migration in Rotterdam is Scheduled to Open in 2025 - Image 2 of 4MAD Architects’ Museum of Migration in Rotterdam is Scheduled to Open in 2025 - Image 3 of 4MAD Architects’ Museum of Migration in Rotterdam is Scheduled to Open in 2025 - More Images+ 2

Casa Gomis by Antonio Bonet and Modern Architecture in Catalonia, Through the Lens of Arnau Rovira

In 2021, the Government of Catalonia recognized Casa Gomis, designed by the architect Antoni Bonet Castellana for the Gomis-Bertrand family between 1949 and 1956, as a Cultural Heritage of National Interest in the category of Historical Monument.

Designed from a distance in Argentina, 'La Ricarda,' as the residence is also known due to its proximity to the eponymous pond, which recently became the center of debate over the expansion of Barcelona Airport, stands out for its vaulted roof and glazed enclosures that engage with the surroundings of Prat de Llobregat.

From Sketch to Painting: A Digital Art Gallery To Inspire Everyday Architectural Work

 | Sponsored Content

The relationship between art and architecture is a recurring topic of discussion, seeing as architecture can be positioned at the intersection of structure, technology, and aesthetics. Despite the utilization of technical knowledge, architecture, and interior design also incorporate artistic concepts into their processes. From captivating illustrations during the design development phase to murals and artistic pieces that form an integral part of spatial conception, art plays an essential role in architectural production and society.

In the context of contemporary society, many of our activities are carried out digitally, from booking accommodation for travel to manufacturing materials and creating art exhibitions. In this sense, digitalization has also permeated the art world, conceiving initiatives like SINGULART, which challenges the traditional concept of art galleries by existing in a digital format. This platform combines works from various sources of inspiration and artistic techniques, encompassing everything from sketches and paintings to architectural photography. It fuses multiple influences from various contexts, including architectural work.

Introducing ArchDaily Gallery: The Online Shop for Architectural Photography and Illustration

ArchDaily is thrilled to unveil its brand-new online shop: ArchDaily gallery, a platform designed to celebrate the captivating work of architectural photographers and illustrators while connecting them with our vibrant community. In this inaugural stage, we proudly feature 11 renowned artists, including Roland Halbe, Nico Saieh, and Sander Patelski.



Capturing the Essence of Delos: A Photographic Journey with Erieta Attali

Nestled amidst the Aegean Sea, the ancient island of Delos emerges as a timeless testament to human ingenuity and the harmonious interplay between architecture and nature, in this captivating series of photographs shared with ArchDaily for the International Day of Photography by artist Erieta Attali, along with the insightful voice of Brazilian architect Angelo Bucci. Inspired by Attali's work, Bucci crafts a narrative that explores the profound connection between architecture and the environment, echoing the ethos of Delos itself.

Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar

It's clear that architecture inspires and impassions Timothy Soar - not only has the UK photographer spent most of his life visiting and capturing great architectural works, but - unlike most photographers, or architects for that matter - he also speaks eloquently about the architecture that inspires him. Describing his favorite building, AHMM's Yellow Building, he tells us it "delivers exquisite simplicity out of a complex lattice. The building has a lyrical poetry in the way it wraps and folds itself around the occupants – deft, confident and generous. It is one of London’s great spaces."

Moreover, Soar believes deeply that his architectural photography does more than merely idealize built forms; not only do his images enable the architects he works with to "refine and amplify" the ideas within their built works, and thus aid them in defining their next work, but it also seeks to advocate architecture for all: "My work as a photographer is predicated on a desire to [...] to be an advocate for design that elevates, to help construct an argument where good design isn’t an occasional, rare and special thing but an everyday, routine and expected event." Read the whole interview and see more of Soar's fantastic images, after the break

Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar - Image 1 of 4Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar - Image 2 of 4Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar - Image 3 of 4Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar - Image 4 of 4Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar - More Images+ 24

WORLD PHOTO DAY: The 13 Architecture Photographers to Follow Now

In honor of World Photo Day, we've rounded up the 13 architectural photographers who have been impressing us most in 2013. From industry heavyweights, like Iwan Baan and Thomas Mayer, to relative new comers, such as Miguel de Guzmán and Fran Parente, these photographers have traveled the world, getting the architectural shots we only dream of. See all 13, after the break...

WORLD PHOTO DAY: The 13 Architecture Photographers to Follow Now - Image 1 of 4WORLD PHOTO DAY: The 13 Architecture Photographers to Follow Now - Image 2 of 4WORLD PHOTO DAY: The 13 Architecture Photographers to Follow Now - Image 3 of 4WORLD PHOTO DAY: The 13 Architecture Photographers to Follow Now - Image 4 of 4WORLD PHOTO DAY: The 13 Architecture Photographers to Follow Now - More Images+ 8

LOST UTOPIAS: Photographer Jade Doskow's Kickstarter Campaign

Since 2007, Jade Doskow has been photographing the remains of World's Fair Sites: once iconic spots that displayed the ambitions/ideals of their eras, now, often forgotten and left to decay. Now, for the 50th anniversary of the 1964 World's Fair in New York (in just a few weeks time), Doskow has a new goal: to shoot all the iconic North American fair sites - from Seattle's Space Needle to San Francisco's Treasure Island. To do so, she's launched a Kickstarter campaign: LOST UTOPIAS. See more of Doskow's stunning images, and find out how to support her Kickstarter campaign, after the break...

Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick

Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick - Image 1 of 4
© Amanda Kirkpatrick

Hurricane Sandy has come and gone, but the destruction she left in her path remains a stark reminder of her strength. 

Photographer Amanda Kirkpatrick has shared with us her images of The Rockaways in Queens, an upper-class beach neighborhood that was one of the areas hit hardest by the storm. Kirkpatrick's objective eye documents the twisted boardwalks and unrecognizably distorted homes in an almost "clinical" way, honestly portraying the damage from the perspective of the broken structures themselves.

If you're interested in getting involved with Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts, you can get more information here. For more images from Amanda Kirkpatrick, read on after the break...

Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick - Image 1 of 4Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick - Image 3 of 4Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick - Image 6 of 4Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick - Image 7 of 4Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy / Amanda Kirkpatrick - More Images+ 3