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Petrās Architecture Designs New Greek Archaeological Museum for Sparta

13:00 - 19 August, 2019
Petrās Architecture Designs New Greek Archaeological Museum for Sparta , Courtesy of Petrās Architecture
Courtesy of Petrās Architecture

Courtesy of Petrās Architecture Courtesy of Petrās Architecture Courtesy of Petrās Architecture Courtesy of Petrās Architecture + 20

Greek design practice Petrās Architecture have created a new proposal for an archaeological museum in Sparta. Designed for the Peloponnese Municipality, the project integrates an existing listed building with a new museum building and the surroundings archaeological finds. The project aims to bring together architecture, history and landscape into a single narrative and museum experience for Sparta.

ArchDaily & Strelka Award: Three Winners Announced

11:57 - 19 August, 2019
ArchDaily & Strelka Award: Three Winners Announced, ​Coffee Production Plant / Khmaladze Architects, Georgia. Image © Giorgi Khmaladze
​Coffee Production Plant / Khmaladze Architects, Georgia. Image © Giorgi Khmaladze

The second round of voting has decided three winners of the ArchDaily & Strelka Award. The grand prize winner will be announced on September 10.

The joint award is organized by ​ArchDaily, Strelka KB, and Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design to celebrate emerging architects and new ideas that transform the contemporary city.

The winners have been selected by readers of ArchDaily and Strelka Mag from a shortlist of 15 architectural projects which were decided in the first round of voting. 

1st Prize Proposal for Latvian Pavilion in Expo Dubai 2020

11:00 - 19 August, 2019
1st Prize Proposal for Latvian Pavilion in Expo Dubai 2020 , Courtesy of Mailitis Architects
Courtesy of Mailitis Architects

The winning proposal for the Latvian Pavilion in Expo Dubai 2020 is designed by Malitis Architects. "Sounding Forest” is the holder of the 1st prize position in a national competition in Latvia. The interactive project puts in place an artificial forest made of piano strings, generating a playful dialogue between the installation and the visitors.

Is Integrating Building Performance Difficult at Your Firm?

10:55 - 19 August, 2019
Is Integrating Building Performance Difficult at Your Firm?, © Cooper Carry
© Cooper Carry

In a study recently published by AIA, less than 13% of architectural firms have incorporated building performance as part of their practice. With buildings contributing 40% of total carbon emissions leading to climate change, just 25 projects are roughly equivalent to planting 1 million trees each year. In addition to that, teams that are able to showcase data-driven and performance-driven decision-making and feature an energy analysis in every pursuit are able to increase fees and generate more revenue. Although integrating building performance sounds like a no-brainer, it proves to be difficult at many firms, because in addition to the practical changes, it requires a culture shift. That culture shift can only happen if the tools are easy to use, accurate, and mesh well with current workflows. Right now is the perfect time to tackle these culture changes due to a few reasons:

Erieta Attali: "I Create Images That Capture an Identity of Place"

10:32 - 19 August, 2019
Erieta Attali: "I Create Images That Capture an Identity of Place", Max Nunez, Nicolas del Rio, House in Portillo, Chile. Image © Erieta Attali
Max Nunez, Nicolas del Rio, House in Portillo, Chile. Image © Erieta Attali

Architecture is mostly known through representations. Even today, when traveling is no longer rare or just for the rich, buildings and places are mostly disseminated and appreciated through images. In that sense, photography has been—and still is—paramount to architecture. The following interview delves into Erieta Attali’s work and the relationship to both architecture and landscape through the lens of her camera. With over two decades of experience, shooting and teaching all over the world, the Israeli photographer reflects on the origins and evolution of her renown practice.

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The Third Chicago Architecture Biennial Announces its 2019 Program

09:00 - 19 August, 2019
The Third Chicago Architecture Biennial Announces its 2019 Program , Courtesy of The Chicago Architecture Biennial
Courtesy of The Chicago Architecture Biennial

The Chicago Architecture Biennial has released its cultural agenda for this year’s edition of the international exhibition. Held in the Chicago Cultural Center and all over the city, from the 19th of September 2019 till the 5th of January 2020, this edition under the theme of: ... And Other Such Stories, is going to be curated by the artistic director Yesomi Umolu, the executive director Todd Palmer and co-curated by Sepake Angiama and Paulo Tavares.

Is Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) the Concrete of the Future?

06:30 - 19 August, 2019
Is Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) the Concrete of the Future? , Wood Innovation Design Centre / Michael Green Architecture. Image © Ema Peter
Wood Innovation Design Centre / Michael Green Architecture. Image © Ema Peter

Concrete, an essential building material, has for decades offered us the possibility of shaping our cities quickly and effectively, allowing them to rapidly expand into urban peripheries and reach heights previously unimagined by mankind. Today, new timber technologies are beginning to deliver similar opportunities – and even superior ones – through materials like Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT).

To better understand the properties and benefits of CLT, we talked with Jorge Calderón, Industrial Designer and CRULAMM Manager. He discusses some of the promising opportunities that CLT could provide architecture in the future. 

"KITERASU" Edificio modelo en CLT en la estación Kuse / ofa. Image © Ken'ichi Suzuki MINIMOD Catuçaba / MAPA. Image © Leonardo Finotti Capilla Sacromonte Landscape Hotel / MAPA Arquitetos. Image © Leonardo Finotti Cortesía de Jorge Calderón + 21

Giancarlo Mazzanti on Social Spaces for Learning

05:00 - 19 August, 2019
Giancarlo Mazzanti on Social Spaces for Learning, © Felipe Rueda
© Felipe Rueda

Courtesy of El Equipo de Mazzanti © Sergio Gomez © Rodrigo Davila © Rodrigo Davila + 8

PLANE—SITE has released a new film showcasing the work and ideas of Bogotá-based architect Giancarlo Mazzanti, founder of El Equipo de Mazzanti. In this video interview, Mazzanti elaborates on his experimental approach to design research and explores several of his spaces for learning. His firm is behind numerous schools and educational centers, designed to encourage playful and exploratory movement and social relations. As the video explore, Mazzanti creates scenarios for play in daily life.

The Paris Researcher Pioneering a New Way to Recycle Building Materials

08:00 - 18 August, 2019
The Paris-based designer and researcher Anna Saint Pierre is rethinking architectural preservation through her Granito project, which was awarded the Best Conscious Design prize at this year’s WantedDesign Brooklyn.. Image © Anna Saint Pierre/Rimasùu
The Paris-based designer and researcher Anna Saint Pierre is rethinking architectural preservation through her Granito project, which was awarded the Best Conscious Design prize at this year’s WantedDesign Brooklyn.. Image © Anna Saint Pierre/Rimasùu

Anna Saint Pierre's Granito project is harvesting the ingredients for new architectural building blocks from demolished structures.

Rapid urban change comes and goes without many even noticing it. Entire slices of a city’s history disappear overnight: What was once a wall of hewn stone is now fritted glass and buffed metal. The building site is always, first, a demolition site.

This is the thread that runs through Granito, a project by the young French designer and doctoral researcher Anna Saint Pierre. Developed in response to a late-20th-century Paris office block due for a major retrofit, one involving disassembly, it hinges on a method of material preservation Saint Pierre calls “in situ recycling.” Her proposal posits that harvesting the individual granite panels of the building’s somber gray facade could form the basis of a circular economy. “No longer in fashion,” this glum stone—all 182 tons of it—would be dislodged, pulverized, and sorted on-site, then incorporated into terrazzo flooring in the building update.

The Top 10 Design Cities of 2019

04:00 - 18 August, 2019
The Top 10 Design Cities of 2019, Skanderberg Square / 51N4E, Anri Sala, & Plan en Houtgoed. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin
Skanderberg Square / 51N4E, Anri Sala, & Plan en Houtgoed. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin

Design trends are often the result of foreign cultural influences, avant-garde creations, and innovative solutions for people's ever-evolving needs. Although the design world seems like one big mood board, some cities have managed to outshine the rest with their recent projects.

As part of their annual Design Cities Listing, Metropolis Magazine has highlighted 10 cities across 5 continents with intriguing projects that have harmonized contemporary urbanism with traditional and faraway influences.

How Renderings Can Contribute to Architectural Projects: The Lumion Example

07:30 - 17 August, 2019
How Renderings Can Contribute to Architectural Projects: The Lumion Example, Cortesia de Lumion
Cortesia de Lumion

Over the past two decades, the role of representation and rendering has changed dramatically in the architecture, engineering, and construction industries. New rendering technologies, techniques, and programs, such as Lumion, have been contributing to this change. By including 3D rendering tools, architects and designers can take advantage of easy-to-use, multifunctional visualization technology that serves to strengthen creativity rather than stifle it.

Day-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist State

06:00 - 17 August, 2019
Day-VII Architecture: How the Architecture of Polish Churches Developed in a Secular Socialist State, Church of Our Lady Queen of Poland in Świdnica. Architect: Marian Tunikowski. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image
Church of Our Lady Queen of Poland in Świdnica. Architect: Marian Tunikowski. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image

Church of St Eugene de Mazenod in Kędzierzyn-Koźle. Architect: Alfons Kupka. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image Church of the Holy Spirit in Wrocław. Architects: Waldemar Wawrzyniak, Jerzy Wojnarowicz, Wojciech Święcicki, Tadeusz Zipser. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image Church of Our Lady of Fatima in Kraków. Architects: Przemysław Gawor, Małgorzata Grabacka, Jan Grabacki. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image Church of St Maximilian Kolbe in Kicznia. Architect: Eugeniusz Baziak. Photo: Igor Snopek. Image + 46

In the mid-to-late 20th century, a secular, socialist Poland served as the backdrop for the construction of thousands of Catholic churches. In their book Day-VII Architecture, Izabela Cichonska, Karolina Popera, and Kuba Snopek analyze the paradoxical facets of this architecture born at the intersection of secularity and religion, charting how its development was influenced by liturgical reform, political movements, and the growth of postmodernism. In the excerpted introduction below, the authors unfold this history, touching on the Second Vatican Council, Solidarity, the Iron Curtain, and more in relation to the development of Day-VII Architecture's ultimately unique postmodern style. The publication has collected photographs of 100 Polish churches built after the year 1945, accompanied by interviews with their architects. To read more about the authors' original Day-VII documentation project, which served as the groundwork for this book, be sure to visit the original article "These Churches Are the Unrecognized Architecture of Poland's Anti-Communist 'Solidarity' Movement."

Old Doors and Insulation Foil: 5 Projects that Derive from Russian Culture

04:00 - 17 August, 2019
© Archstoyanie
© Archstoyanie

Russia is an enigmatic country known for its sublime constructivism developed during Soviet times, its greatness and enormous scale. It comes as no shocker — architects, such as Ivan Leonidov and his student Leonid Pavlov, and artists like El Lissitzky, have definitely contributed to the history and image of a strong Russian personality.

Considering the prevalent poverty in Russia, the reason for the fixation on cheap construction is rather clear. However, even local leading architects find something attractive and beautiful in the suburban barns and flimsy dwellings. Creating authentic installations in the shape of houses or changing and enhancing the experience of existing structures with materials at hand, Russian artists and architects express the country's skill of turning the ruined and inhabitable into the lively and cozy.

Bee Breeders Announces Winners of SKYHIVE Skyscraper Challenge

13:00 - 16 August, 2019
Bee Breeders Announces Winners of SKYHIVE Skyscraper Challenge, Courtesy of Bee Breeders
Courtesy of Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders have announced the winners of the SKYHIVE Skyscraper Challenge. The purpose of the competition was to allow architects, design students, engineers, and artists from all over the world to generate design ideas for iconic high rise buildings in cities around the globe. As part of this design series, participants were encouraged to incorporate new technologies, materials, forms, spatial organizations, and construction systems in their designs for a skyscraper.

Sanjay Puri on the Potential and the Challenges of Architecture in India

09:00 - 16 August, 2019
Sanjay Puri on the Potential and the Challenges of Architecture in India

During the World Architecture Festival in Amsterdam, ArchDaily sat down with Sanjay Puri who discussed his starting point, the architectural possibilities presented in India, and the oppositions faced by architects in his country. He also spoke of the importance of building in your context and not copying the past or the built environment in other parts of the earth.

With an office of more than 70, in Mumbai, Sanjay Puri Architects are currently working on several new ventures including education, residential, offices, hotel, and hospitality projects.

An Ornamental Shade and a Desert Sauna for Burning Man 2019

07:30 - 16 August, 2019
An Ornamental Shade and a Desert Sauna for Burning Man 2019, Steam of Life . Image Courtesy of Sauna On Fire And JKMM Architects
Steam of Life . Image Courtesy of Sauna On Fire And JKMM Architects

This year’s theme for the famous annual Burning Man festival revolves around the notion of “Metamorphosis”. Taking place in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, from the 25th of August till the 2nd of September, each year artists and architects from around the world get creative and imagine installations and pavilions responding to one general question.

For the 2019 edition, Burning Man has already revealed the design for the Central Temple by Geordie Van Der Bosch. Read on to discover more about 2 interventions, taking part in this year's event, an Ornamental Shade from San Francisco and a Desert Sauna from Finland.

India Approves World’s First Passenger Hyperloop System

05:00 - 16 August, 2019
India Approves World’s First Passenger Hyperloop System, Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One
Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One

Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One + 5

The Government of Maharashtra has deemed Virgin Hyperloop One a public infrastructure project, setting it up to become the first hyperloop project in the world. The announcement brings the hyperloop transportation system in India closer to reality, recognizing hyperloop technology alongside other more traditional forms of mass transit. Dubbed the Pune-Mumbai Hyperloop, the project will link central Pune to Mumbai in under 35 minutes, as opposed to the current 3.5+ hours by road.

We Need More Wheelchair Users to Become Architects

04:00 - 16 August, 2019
We Need More Wheelchair Users to Become Architects, © Giordano Aita / Shutterstock
© Giordano Aita / Shutterstock

When famed architect Michael Graves contracted a mysterious virus in 2003, a new chapter in his life began. Paralyzed from the chest down, the pioneer of Postmodernism would be permanently required to use a wheelchair. Graves could have been forgiven for believing that having fought for his life, having been treated in eight hospitals and four rehab clinics, and needing permanent use of a wheelchair, that his most influential days as an architect were behind him. This was not the case. To the contrary, he would use this new circumstance to design trend-setting hospitals, rehab centers, and other typologies right up to his death in 2015, all with a new-found awareness of the everyday realities of those in wheelchairs, and what architects were, and were not doing, to aid their quality of life.

Santiago Calatrava receives a fine for negligence on his bridge in Venice

15:15 - 15 August, 2019
Santiago Calatrava receives a fine for negligence on his bridge in Venice, © Wikipedia, author: F.J.OGALLAR Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
© Wikipedia, author: F.J.OGALLAR Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava was fined by the Court of Accounts of Venice to pay 78,000 euros for errors that increased the cost of the construction of the Constitution Bridge on the Grand Canal of Venice.

GROUPWORK + Amin Taha Architects Win Motion Against Demolishing 15 Clerkenwell Close

13:39 - 15 August, 2019
GROUPWORK + Amin Taha Architects Win Motion Against Demolishing 15 Clerkenwell Close, 15 Clerkenwell Close / GROUPWORK + Amin Taha Architects. Image © Timothy Soar
15 Clerkenwell Close / GROUPWORK + Amin Taha Architects. Image © Timothy Soar

After a 2-year trial, GROUPWORK and Amin Taha Architects won the motion against demolishing the 15 Clerkenwell Close building.

The architects behind the RIBA award-winning project have been in an ongoing battle with local planning authorities over attempts of demolishing the 7-storey building in the city of Clerkenwell, UK. Taha has also received an enforcement notice last year, claiming that "the structure does not reflect the building that was granted planning permission and conservation area consent in 2013".

However, a planning inspector overturned the council’s demolition request, granting the architects planning permission regardless of the differences between what was proposed and what is developed.  

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