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The Impact of the "Happiness Industry" on Architecture

10:00 - 19 May, 2019
The Impact of the "Happiness Industry" on Architecture , "Lava dwellers” in Kalapana State Wayside Park on the island of Hawaii. Image © John Sanphillippo
"Lava dwellers” in Kalapana State Wayside Park on the island of Hawaii. Image © John Sanphillippo

Although The Architecture of Happiness did not gain momentum after its publication in the mid-2000s, the ideology of architecture and well-being has remained a topic of intrigue until today. To further explore this ideology, the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), with the curation of Francesco Garutti, have put together an exhibition that explores how the “happiness industry” has controlled every aspect of contemporary life after the 2008 financial crash.

Our Happy Life, Architecture and Well-being in the Age of Emotional Capitalism is a non-archival show that exhibits work from architects, artists, and photographers. Metropolis’ Samuel Medina spoke to Garutti to discuss the notion behind the exhibition, social media, and architecture’s new spaces of meaning.

Paul Goldberger on Ballpark: Baseball in the American City

08:00 - 19 May, 2019
Paul Goldberger on Ballpark: Baseball in the American City, Orioles Park at Camden Yards by Bob Busser
Orioles Park at Camden Yards by Bob Busser

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Paul Goldberger has a new book out, released just this week, entitled Ballpark: Baseball in the American City. Taking a page from the Ken Burns playbook, the book looks at a particularly American building type as a lens for looking at the broader culture of cities. Goldberger’s premise is a good one: Ballparks do parallel, to a remarkable degree, trends in American urbanism. They start as an escape from the city, then the city builds up around them. Post–World War II, they escape to the suburbs, then decades later return to the city. Today, privatization of the public realm and real estate development are driving the agenda. Recently I talked with Goldberger about the new book and a whole slew of magical ballparks, both living and long gone.

16 Temporary Pavilions that Reflect on Public Space

06:00 - 19 May, 2019
Signals 1.0 by Tools for Action. Image © José Manuel Cutillas
Signals 1.0 by Tools for Action. Image © José Manuel Cutillas

The Wooden Car Covering by Benedetto Bufalino. Image © José Manuel Cutillas Living Cloister by Parasite 2.0. Image © José Manuel Cutillas Taburete Tower de SZCZ Jakub Szczesny. Image © José Manuel Cutillas A Trip Around the Hazelnut Tree by Pablo Losa y Gadea Burgaz. Image © José Manuel Cutillas + 29

The International Festival of Concentric Architecture and Design is characterized by its temporary displays that take place throughout the city. For this year's festival, 16 exhibits have been created that seek to experiment with spaces both within and outside the city of Logroño, bringing with them a whole new way to see and experience the urban surroundings.

10 Buildings That Helped Define Modernism in New York City

08:00 - 18 May, 2019
211 East 48th Street, Midtown East, William Lescaze, 1934. Image © Mark Wickens
211 East 48th Street, Midtown East, William Lescaze, 1934. Image © Mark Wickens

Greater Refuge Temple, Harlem, Costas Machlouzarides, 1966. Image © Mark Wickens Monsignor Farrell High School, Staten Island, Charles Luckman Associates, 1962. Image © Mark Wickens The “Bubble House” (1969) on East 71st Street is one of the city’s most idiosyncratic Modern buildings. Its convex apertures are surprisingly operable, swiveling open from the side. Image © Mark Wickens Tribeca Synagogue, William N. Breger, 1967. Image © Mark Wickens + 12

This Article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine here.

The story of architectural Modernism in New York City goes beyond the familiar touchstones of Lever House and the Seagram Building.

Eighty-five years on, the little white town house on East 48th Street by William Lescaze still startles. With its bright stucco and Purist volumes, it pulls the eye away from the do-nothing brownstones on one side and the noirish sub-Miesian tower on the other. The machined rectitude of its upper floors, telegraphed by two clumsily large spans of glass block, is offset by the freer plastic arrangement of the bottom levels. Le Corbusier’s five points are in evidence (minus the roof garden), suggesting an architecture ready to do battle. Built in 1934 from the shell of a Civil War–era town house, this was the first Modernist house in New York City, and its pioneering feeling for futurity extended to its domestic conveniences. (A skeptical Lewis Mumford noted its central air-conditioning.)

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Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens

06:00 - 18 May, 2019
Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens, Casa Torre / Andrew Maynard Architects. Image © Peter Bennetts
Casa Torre / Andrew Maynard Architects. Image © Peter Bennetts

As urban dwellers become more aware of the environmental impacts of food production and transportation, as well as the origin and security of what they consume, urban agriculture is bound to grow and attract public and political eyes. Bringing food production closer, in addition to being sustainable, is pedagogical. However, generally with small size and other restrictions, the concerns of growing food in cities differ somewhat from traditional farming.

Urban gardens can occupy a multitude of places and have varied scales - window sills and balconies, slabs and vacant lots, courtyards of schools, public parks and even unlikely places, such as subway tunnels. They can also be communitarian or private. Whatever the case, it is important to consider some variables:

No Restaurante Tuju, projeto de vapor arquitetura + Garupa Estúdio, todos o paisagismo é feito com espécies comestíveis. Image © Pedro Napolitano Prata Cortesia de US Department of Agriculture Planter Box House / Formzero. Image © Ameen Deen Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens + 19

Spotlight: Walter Gropius

05:00 - 18 May, 2019
Bauhaus, 1925. Image ©  Thomas Lewandovski
Bauhaus, 1925. Image © Thomas Lewandovski

One of the most highly regarded architects of the 20th century, Walter Gropius (18 May 1883 – 5 July 1969) was one of the founding fathers of Modernism, and the founder of the Bauhaus, the German "School of Building" that embraced elements of art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography in its design, development and production.

This Architectural Movie Uses an Abandoned Building in Lebanon to Create a Modern Fairy Tale

13:00 - 17 May, 2019
© JPAG
© JPAG

Lebanon-based firm JPAG has created a short architectural movie titled “Coming Back to Life” which uses an abandoned icon from the Lebanese civil war to generate a modern day fairy tale. The Burj El Murr (Tower of Bitterness) has been reimagined in a cinematic narrative loaded with emotional content and dramatic sceneries, in an attempt to generate new understandings of what an architectural concept is.

Zaha Hadid Architects' First 2022 Qatar World Cup Stadium Completed

11:00 - 17 May, 2019
Zaha Hadid Architects' First 2022 Qatar World Cup Stadium Completed , © Hufton+Crow
© Hufton+Crow

Construction has been completed on the Al Janoub Stadium, the first stadium commissioned for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects and Aecom, and situated in the city of Al Wakrah, the stadium underwent a design process beginning in 2013, and was inaugurated on May 16th 2019.

© Hufton+Crow © Hufton+Crow © Hufton+Crow © Hufton+Crow + 19

Adjaye Associates' First US Residential Skyscraper Tops Out in New York City

09:00 - 17 May, 2019
Adjaye Associates' First US Residential Skyscraper Tops Out in New York City, © Binyan Studios
© Binyan Studios

The Adjaye Associates-designed 130 William has topped out in Lower Manhattan at 800 feet. The first residential skyscraper in the USA designed by the firm, the iconic exterior architecture features a custom hand-cast façade with rhythmic large-scale arched windows and bronze detailing. Made to recall New York City’s historic fabric from the 19th and early 20th centuries, the tower will include 242 new luxury condominiums in the Financial District over 66 stories.

Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects

07:00 - 17 May, 2019
Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects, 'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus
'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus

The need to substantially reduce our impact on the planet must be translated into a significant change to our lifestyle and habits. One of these is to consume responsibly and consider that waste does not exist, but that all material can be transformed into something useful again following a circular ecological system.

In his book Upcycling Wood, Reutilización creativa de la madera, the architect and artist Bruno Sève writes and edits a non-exhaustive guide of the uses and possibilities of recovered wood, as a framework for responsible reuse; from small scale, such as furniture or artists' canvases, to medium scale, with its use in interiors and facades. This book seeks to raise awareness among professionals and citizens in general through analysis of the life cycle, examples of uses and finishing processes, leading to an ecological and responsible framework. The book is illustrated by numerous design and architecture teams who follow the guidelines of ecological design with reclaimed wood.

Hotel Lobby and Nishi Grand Stair Interior / March Studio. Image © John Gollings 'San Cristóbal', by Bruno Sève. Image © Bruno Sève © Uhuru Recycling Woodstore. Image © The Community wood recycling + 20

Juan Herreros on His Thriving Career in Architecture and Academia

05:00 - 17 May, 2019
Juan Herreros on His Thriving Career in Architecture and Academia, Courtesy of Juan Herreros
Courtesy of Juan Herreros

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

The goal of the series is to research these successful firms and attempt to understand their methods and approaches. By hopefully gaining a clearer picture of what it means to be an architect in the 21st century, the videos can also serve as inspiration for the next generation of up-and-coming architects and students as they enter the field.

Juan Herreros is an acclaimed Spanish architect with multiple award-winning projects to date. In addition to his impressive creations in the construction field, he has strived to redefine the practice of architecture by teaching at the School of Architecture in Madrid and at the GSAPP Columbia University in New York. His collaborative office, Studio Herreros, is an award-winning firm with projects built all over the world, ranging between residential and public spaces. These projects vary between small-scale, "immediate" projects, and internationally-commissioned structures and building competitions, allowing the architect to be one of the most influential Spanish architects practicing today.

Amey Kandalgaonkar Explores the Architectural Possibilities of Combining Desert Rocks and Geometric Forms

04:30 - 17 May, 2019
House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar
House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar

House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar House Inside a Rock. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar Rock House 3. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar Rock House 3. Image © Amey Kandalgaonkar + 13

Although architecture has been constantly evolving, past builders have laid out a huge amount architectural heritage for us to learn from and get inspired by, and integrating natural elements with man-made structures is no exception.

Shanghai-based architect and architectural photographer Amey Kandalgaonkar found inspiration in the rock cut-tomb of Madain Saleh in Saudi Arabia, and with the same architecture approach, designed two residential projects that incorporate architecture with the rigid parts of nature.

7 Must-See Pavilions at the 2019 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 17 May, 2019
7 Must-See Pavilions at the 2019 Venice Biennale, Installation view of Sun & Sea (Marina), at the Lithuanian pavilion at the 58th International Art Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia, 2019.  © Andrej Vasilenko
Installation view of Sun & Sea (Marina), at the Lithuanian pavilion at the 58th International Art Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia, 2019. © Andrej Vasilenko

The Venice Biennale of Arts is a great opportunity to think outside the box. From the collateral events that bring new uses for centenary buildings to the country pavilions in Giardini or Arsenale, an architect can learn a lot by visiting the world's oldest biennial. Here are 7 must-see pavilions if you are visiting Venice before the Biennale ends on the 24th of November. 

TRS Studio Converts Shipping Container into Single Family Module

13:00 - 16 May, 2019
TRS Studio Converts Shipping Container into Single Family Module , © TRS Studio
© TRS Studio

TRS Studio has unveiled their design for a social project in the Callao region of Peru. The single-family module is based on a cargo container, constructed with strong materials emitting a low cost, and low environmental impact. The project is founded on community participation, improving the quality of health and housing in the Pesquero II settlement through sustainable materials.

© TRS Studio © TRS Studio © TRS Studio © TRS Studio + 11

AMO Curates Virgil Abloh Exhibition for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

11:00 - 16 May, 2019
AMO Curates Virgil Abloh Exhibition for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago,  Virgil Abloh, “dollar a gallon,” 2018. Installation view, Virgil Abloh: “PAY PER VIEW,” March 16 – April 1, 2018. Kaikai Kiki Gallery, Tokyo. Courtesy of the artist.. Image
Virgil Abloh, “dollar a gallon,” 2018. Installation view, Virgil Abloh: “PAY PER VIEW,” March 16 – April 1, 2018. Kaikai Kiki Gallery, Tokyo. Courtesy of the artist.. Image

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is to present an AMO-curated exhibition devoted to the work of the ultra-modern, genre-bending artist and designer Virgil Abloh. Titled “Virgil Abloh: Figures of Speech” the immersive space has been designed by the Museum's Chief Curator Michael Darling, and Samir Bantal, a director at OMA’s research wing, focusing on the creative process and collaborative work of Abloh who is redefining fashion, art, and design.

 Virgil Abloh, Yeezus Album Art, 2013/19. Courtesy of the artist.. Image  Virgil Abloh, Off-White First Season “Framing Grey Area” Grid Arm Chair, 2016. Courtesy of the artist.. Image  Virgil Abloh, Color Gradient Chair, 2018. Courtesy of the artist.. Image  Pioneer, Pioneer DJM and CDJ. Courtesy of the artist. Image + 10

Studio INI's Urban Imprint Exhibition Debuts at A/D/O for NYCx Design

09:00 - 16 May, 2019
Studio INI's Urban Imprint Exhibition Debuts at A/D/O for NYCx Design, © Studio INI / A/D/O
© Studio INI / A/D/O

Studio INI is set to unveil Urban Imprint, an immersive installation at A/D/O by MINI in Brooklyn that reconstructs the fabric of our urban environment and imagines the city as a megaphone to the self. The outdoor installation will open to the public tomorrow, May 17th, during NYCxDesign, New York City’s annual celebration of Design which takes place throughout May.

© Studio INI / A/D/O © Studio INI / A/D/O © Studio INI / A/D/O © Studio INI / A/D/O + 6

Is the Internet Bringing Us to the Middle Ages? / Deyan Sudjic's Response to the Curatorial Statement of the Shenzhen Biennale(UABB) 2019

07:00 - 16 May, 2019
Is the Internet Bringing Us to the Middle Ages? / Deyan Sudjic's Response to the Curatorial Statement of the Shenzhen Biennale(UABB) 2019, Netherlandish Proverbs, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1559, a photographic reproduction by Google Cultural Institute
Netherlandish Proverbs, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1559, a photographic reproduction by Google Cultural Institute

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT. If you are interested in taking part in the exhibition at UABB 2019, submit your proposal to the “Eyes of the City” Open Call by May 31st, 2019: www.eyesofthecity.net

Without the city, modernity could never have been invented.  What we are in the midst of discovering now is whether modernity can survive in a city transformed by the digital revolution. The village may offer security and community, but what it does not allow its inhabitants is the possibility of being different, a phenomenon that is as true now as it was during the witch-burning era. 

How Designing for Air Quality May Determine the Outcome of Your Meeting

04:00 - 16 May, 2019
How Designing for Air Quality May Determine the Outcome of Your Meeting, © Max Lee. ImageRain of Light / Yuan Architects
© Max Lee. ImageRain of Light / Yuan Architects

Humans can survive for 30 days without eating, 3 days without drinking, yet only 3 minutes without breathing. Of course our need for air is also constant, we rely on it at all times indoors and outdoors although can often be less clean than we would hope. Unpleasant odors make us aware of bad air, but many irritants and unhealthy gases are not easily detectable by smell while still affecting our health. Smells are the most obvious signal, as they are consciously perceived by the brain and nervous system, allowing us to make judgements about our environment.

Learn more about where poor indoor air quality comes from, why it's important to address within the built environment, and how to design for good indoor air quality and comfort.

© Vivek Muthuramalingam. ImageBiome Environmental Solutions © Javier Callejas. ImageAlberto Campo Baeza © Ishita Sitwala. ImageDesign Work Group  © Nelson Kon. ImageMipibu House / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image + 17

Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter Designs Vernacular Norwegian Mountain Village

13:00 - 15 May, 2019
Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter Designs Vernacular Norwegian Mountain Village, © Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter
© Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter has unveiled details of their housing scheme in Hafjelltoppen, Norway. Designed to accommodate about 1000 people, Mosetertoppen is rooted in both tradition and innovation, with inspiration drawn from the cultural landscape and building art, and a rethinking in relation to sustainable architecture, and how to build in the Norwegian mountain landscape in the future.

Mola Structural Kit 3 Launches on Kickstarter

10:00 - 15 May, 2019
Mola Structural Kit 3 Launches on Kickstarter, Mola Structural Kit 3. Image Courtesy of Mola Model
Mola Structural Kit 3. Image Courtesy of Mola Model

Following the popularity of their first two structural modeling kits, today Mola Model launches their Kickstarter campaign for Mola Structural Kit 3. Mola3 introduces cable structures to the system of hands-on structural learning, integrating seamlessly with the previous two kits. Because the Mola kits are designed as a single modular system, the new kit can be combined with the previous two, all connected via magnets, to model iconic structures like the Sydney Harbor Bridge or London’s Stansted Airport with the help of the bilingual instruction booklet.

Milano Arch Week Publishes Program Featuring Talks by Stefano Boeri and Rem Koolhaas

09:00 - 15 May, 2019
Milano Arch Week Publishes Program Featuring Talks by Stefano Boeri and Rem Koolhaas, Into the Forest - Fallen Forest by Openfabric. Image © Jacopo Gennari Feslikenian
Into the Forest - Fallen Forest by Openfabric. Image © Jacopo Gennari Feslikenian

Milano Arch Week has published details of their 2019 event, hosting a week of lectures, conversations, workshops, and itineraries on the main challenges of contemporary urban transformation. Running from 21st to the 26th May 2019, Milano Arch Week “explores the future of architecture and cities through a polyphony of voices; architects, urban planners, landscape designers, scientists, philosophers, artists, and curators from all over the world.”

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