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Sustainable Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Bio-climatic Fixtures in Buenos Aires' Houses as Seen In Floor Plans and Layout

House N / Estudio GM ARQ. Image Golf House / BAM! arquitectura. Image AC House / Estudio GM ARQ. Image PYE House / BAM! arquitectura. Image + 20

The principles of bio-climatic architecture, when applied with an understanding of the surrounding climate and geography, can simultaneously increase a building's efficiency and create a more comfortable living space. Passive measures like solar panels, rainwater and grey water harvesting, openings for natural light, and cross-ventilation are all low-cost, high yield methods of increasing a home's thermal comfort and efficiency and decreasing its carbon footprint.

Endless “Sustainable” Growth is an Oxymoron

This article was originally published on Common Edge

In a Common Edge article, I briefly discussed a concept that I call the “Triple Bottom Lie,” which posits that more people, plus more consumption by each person, plus an economic system completely dependent on the aforementioned items, can just keep working forever, without consequences. Historically, the United States has accepted the economic shibboleth of endless growth because it reduced class conflict; a rising tide (supposedly) lifted all boats, rafts and yachts included. We are, however, approaching the limits of growth, from both a resource standpoint (we’re running out of raw materials) and a technological standpoint (our inventions are progressively less revolutionary).

MVRDV Breaks Ground on Matrix 1, a Sustainable Office and Laboratory Complex in Amsterdam

Construction has begun on MVRDV’s six-story sustainable office and laboratory complex. Located in the heart of Amsterdam Science Park, in the eastern part of the city, the project, designed for the Matrix Innovation Center, “will be virtually energy neutral and uses demountable construction techniques”.

Courtesy of MVRDVCourtesy of MVRDVCourtesy of MVRDVCourtesy of MVRDV+ 9

Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials

According to a survey by the Brazilian Association for Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste (ABRECON), there has been an increase in the recycling of construction and demolition waste (C&D) in Brazil in recent years. According to the 2015 report, 21% of the total C&D was recycled in the country that year, while in 2013 the rate was 19%.

The outlook is promising but not yet ideal, and the growth of recycled C&D materials is still considered small. In Brazil, construction waste can represent between 50% and 70% of the total municipal solid waste. This means, we still need to advocate for a more common practice of material recycling and reuse in architecture, especially in Brazil.

Michelle House / Yuri Vasconcelos Arquitetura. Image: © Alexandre Santos LimaPacheco Leão AL Residence / Ateliê de Arquitetura. Image: © André NazarethHouse in Samambaia / Rodrigo Simão Arquitetura. Image: © André NazarethFlamboyant Residence / Perkins+Will. Image: © Nelson Kon+ 11

Tropical Chalet / G8A Architecture & Urban Planning

© Hiroyuki Oki© Hiroyuki Oki© Hiroyuki Oki© Hiroyuki Oki+ 16

Logie Point House / Guz Architects

© Patrick Bingham-Hall© Patrick Bingham-Hall© Patrick Bingham-Hall© Patrick Bingham-Hall+ 14

  • Architects: Guz Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1425
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Door Entry IP, Lummel GmBH & Co.KG, Solar Strategies, Trimble Navigation

A Look into Vietnamese Vernacular Construction: 1+1>2 Architect’s Rural Community Houses

© Hoang Thuc Hao© Hoang Thuc Hao, Nguyen Duy Thanh© Hoang Thuc Hao, Vu Xuan Son, Pham Duy Tung© Vu Xuan Son+ 17

This year the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) has been looking at tourism as a way to create jobs and opportunities in rural areas under the banner of Tourism and Rural Development.

Rural based Architecture and traditional edifices play an important role in showcasing local heritage building and craftsmanship. It can also offer jobs and prospects outside of big cities particularly for the communities that might otherwise be left behind. 

Reduce, Reuse and Recycle: the Three R's Rule Applied to Architecture

As levels of pollutant emissions have increased over the years, awareness has also grown regarding actions that can be taken to minimize the damage caused to the planet. As a way to promote waste reduction or prevention, the 3 R's rule is created: reduce, reuse and recycle. These actions, together with sustainable consumption standards, have been promoted as a means to protect natural resources and minimize waste.

Sen Village Community Center / VTN Architects. Image: © Quang TranWaste Side Story Pavilion / Cloud-floor. Image: © Ketsiree WongwanThird Wave Kiosk / Tony Hobba Architects. Image: © Rory GardinerHouse in La Prosperina / Fabrica Nativa Arquitectura. Courtesy of Fabrica Nativa Arquitectura+ 15

Call For Submissions: Sustainable Revolution

As reaction to the unprecedented moment that we are all experiencing, Zuecca Projects has decided to launch its first ever Open Call, on the theme of Sustainable Architecture and Design.

The International Call for Submission “Sustainable Revolution” is open to Architecture and Engineering Firms, Designers, Projects and Companies that are forward looking into the future and offering sustainable solutions and possibilities to the New World we will go to inhabit from here on out.

Selected projects and submissions will be included in the exhibition “Sustainable Revolution” organized by Zuecca Projects in Venice, from August 28 to October 30, 2020. Hosted at Squero

Planning Permissions Granted for Zaha Hadid's Timber Stadium in England

The world’s greenest football stadium, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects will be built in Gloucestershire, England after planning permissions were finally granted by the local council.

Is Integrating Building Performance Difficult at Your Firm?

In a study recently published by AIA, less than 13% of architectural firms have incorporated building performance as part of their practice. With buildings contributing 40% of total carbon emissions leading to climate change, just 25 projects are roughly equivalent to planting 1 million trees each year. In addition to that, teams that are able to showcase data-driven and performance-driven decision-making and feature an energy analysis in every pursuit are able to increase fees and generate more revenue. Although integrating building performance sounds like a no-brainer, it proves to be difficult at many firms, because in addition to the practical changes, it requires a culture shift. That culture shift can only happen if the tools are easy to use, accurate, and mesh well with current workflows. Right now is the perfect time to tackle these culture changes due to a few reasons:

School and Daycare Projects for Different Climates

European children spend approximately 200 days a year at primary school. Even though the academic year in most parts of the world is not as long as in Europe, the place where children and adolescents spend the most time, following their own homes, is usually in educational institutions. These can be places for learning, playing and socializing, and as sad as it may be, they can also be safer places for children living in environments of abandonment, hunger, and violence, providing them with opportunities and even meals. A United Kingdom-wide survey found that the differences in physical characteristics of classrooms accounted for 16% of the variations in learning progress over the course of a year. In other words, the better a classroom is designed, the better children perform academically. According to the study, the factors that most affect children are sunlight, indoor air quality, acoustic environment, temperature, the design of the classroom itself and the stimulation within it.

A Green Vision for Finland in 2070

Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta Arkkitehtitoimisto & Company Architects have designed a futuristic green vision for an island in Finland. Titled “Emerald Envisioning for Luonnonmaa 2070,” the scheme is set on Luonnonmaa island on the Finnish West archipelago coast, close to the city of Turku. The vision for the island is one where climate change and biodiversity decline are combated through a reimagination of the urban connection with nature.

© Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta Arkkitehtitoimisto & Company© Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta Arkkitehtitoimisto & Company© Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta Arkkitehtitoimisto & Company© Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta Arkkitehtitoimisto & Company+ 9

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : D-E-F

It is expected that within the next few of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it.

Since architects and designers carry a responsibility of building a substantial future, we have put together an A-Z list of every sustainability term that you might come across. Every week, a new set of letters will be published, helping you stay well-rounded on everything related to sustainable architecture and design. Here are the terms that start with letters D, E, and F.

The Impact of the "Happiness Industry" on Architecture

Although The Architecture of Happiness did not gain momentum after its publication in the mid-2000s, the ideology of architecture and well-being has remained a topic of intrigue until today. To further explore this ideology, the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), with the curation of Francesco Garutti, have put together an exhibition that explores how the “happiness industry” has controlled every aspect of contemporary life after the 2008 financial crash.

Our Happy Life, Architecture and Well-being in the Age of Emotional Capitalism is a non-archival show that exhibits work from architects, artists, and photographers. Metropolis’ Samuel Medina spoke to Garutti to discuss the notion behind the exhibition, social media, and architecture’s new spaces of meaning.

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C

It is expected that within the next couple of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it. 

Since architects and designers carry a responsibility of building a substantial future, we have put together an A-Z list of every sustainability term that you might come across. Every week, a new set of letters will be published, helping you stay well-rounded on everything related to sustainable architecture and design. Here are the terms that start with letters A, B, and C.

5 Ways to Discuss Building Performance for Your Next Project Pursuit

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Today in the United States, buildings account for nearly 40% of carbon emissions (EESI) and 78% of electricity usage. The most sustainability-focused firms run energy simulations for less than 50% of their projects (10% for a typical firm) and only doing so late in the process when design changes are limited and insufficient to combat red flags found in the performance report (AIA 2030 report). We can make building performance widespread once we help the entire community discuss the subject in terms of investment and return. Especially during a project pursuit, since having the buy in from the whole team helps ensure the key project metrics are met. Owners are seeking out teams who are using actual metrics and data driven processes that affect their bottom line. This new approach to practice is what makes the younger teams’ standout and will benefit both the climate and the bottom-line. Here are 5 ways to talk about building performance in your project pursuits: