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Community Center: The Latest Architecture and News

Community Facilities in Brazil That Make Room for People

Community facilities are spaces for social interaction where people find leisure and information. Whether a cultural or a community center, this type of equipment aims to bring people together, creating opportunities for interaction in an environment of care and neighborhood.

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In Times of Need: Architects Stepping Up in Humanitarian Crisis

Hard times bring people together. In recent years we have seen how collective work can be a driving force to help those affected by natural or man-made disasters. After a disaster or displacement, a safe physical environment is often essential. Therefore, the need for coordination becomes a key factor in assisting people in times of need.

Architects, as "Shelter Specialists", play an important role in creating safe and adequate environments, whether it is individual housing, public buildings, schools, or emergency tent camps. But as architect Diébédo Francis Kéré says, "When you have nothing and you want to convince your community to believe in an idea, it may happen that everybody starts working with you, but you need to keep fighting to convince them."

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Architecture as a Transforming Agent: Urban Rehabilitation in Cape Verde

Architecture as a Transforming Agent: Urban Rehabilitation in Cape Verde - Featured Image
© Marcelo Londoño

Improving people's quality of life is one of the biggest goals of professionals in Architecture and Urbanism. When planning cities, creating housing or carrying out a simple refurbishment, we seek to improve the built space regardless of scale. The Urban Rehabilitation of Alto de Bomba, carried out in the city of Mindelo, Cape Verde, arose from the need to combat the precariousness found previously in the place. A project that required the immersion of the team in the daily life of the city and resulted in an inspiring proof of how much architecture can reveal better ways of living the city and acting directly in society. No wonder it received the Work of the Year Award in 2022, chosen by our readers as the winner among hundreds of competing projects.

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OMA / Jason Long Transforms Former Warehouse into Mixed-Use Arts and Community Venue in Detroit

OMA / Jason Long Transforms Former Warehouse into Mixed-Use Arts and Community Venue in Detroit - Featured Image
Proposed, South Facade. Image © OMA and Luxigon

OMA /Jason Long revealed its latest adaptive reuse project in Detroit, transforming a former bakery and warehouse into mixed-use art, education and community space. Developed in collaboration with Library Street Collective, the project provides new headquarters for two local non-profits, PASC and Signal-Return, while creating a mix of artist studios, galleries, community-serving retail and gathering spaces. Dubbed “LANTERN”, the development is set to become an “activity condenser.”

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Farshid Moussavi Architecture Reveals Design for Houston Ismaili Centre

Farshid Moussavi Architecture Reveals Design for Houston Ismaili Centre - Featured Image
Courtesy of Farshid Moussavi Architects

Farshid Moussavi Architecture has recently revealed the design for the Ismaili Center in Houston, a project dedicated to cultural exchanges and civic outreach. An ambassadorial building for the largest Ismaili Muslim community in the United States, the new building will host educational, cultural and social events, while also providing a space for contemplation and prayer. The design showcases a contemporary image while reinterpreting traditional Persian elements, thus establishing a dialogue between tradition and modern architecture.

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The Incredible Opportunity of Community Schoolyards

A new report from The Trust for Public Land (TPL) makes a compelling case for transforming underperforming, paved public schoolyards into green oases for the entire community. While the benefits for schools and their educational communities are clear, TPL sees an opportunity to open up these facilities to surrounding neighborhoods after school hours, on weekends, and when school is out. If all 90,000 public schools in the country had a “community schoolyard,” more communities could tackle the persistent park equity issue — in which too few communities, particularly undeserved ones, enjoy access to nearby high-quality public green spaces. TPL argues that opening up all schoolyards, essentially turning them into part-time all-access community hubs, would “put a park within a 10-minute walk of nearly 20 million people — solving the problem of outdoor access for one-fifth of the nation’s 100 million people who don’t currently have a park close to home.”

BOGDAN & VAN BROECK and BC ARCHITECTS & STUDIES Design Centre for Drug Users in Brussels

BOGDAN & VAN BROECK and BC ARCHITECTS & STUDIES Design Centre for Drug Users in Brussels - Featured Image
© BOGDAN & VAN BROECK and BC ARCHITECTS & STUDIES

The two Belgian practices BOGDAN & VAN BROECK and BC Architects & Studies are currently designing a care centre for drug users in Brussels, which would provide this vulnerable group with a safe and welcoming environment accessible 24/7. Featuring temporary residencies and community spaces, the building neighbouring the city’s port functions as a contemporary version of an inn, bringing a domestic character to an underwise sterile institutional program.

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Henning Larsen Designs Active Community Hub as their First London Project

Located in the heart of Westminster, a short distance away from the Buckingham Palace, Henning Larsen are building a community hub that reimagines traditional office and commercial spaces. 105 Victoria Street will be the architecture firm's first ever project in London, providing visitors with an urban plaza that enables an active and social working environment both indoors and outdoors. The project is being developed by BentallGreenOak and is designed in collaboration with Adamson Associates Architects and KPF.

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Participatory Architecture: Community Involvement in Project Development

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When designing community spaces, the architectural concept can easily clash with the user's experience. Therefore, engaging the community and future users in the project development and design process is a way of adding different perspectives to the architect's vision towards a more intelligent architecture.

The Slovenian Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Social Infrastructure of Local Cooperative Centres

Slovenia's contribution to the 17th Venice Architecture Biennale explores interior public spaces as vital social infrastructure through the lens of the local cooperative centre typology. Titled "The Common in Community", the exhibition curated by Blaž Babnik Romaniuk, Martina Malešič, Rastko Pečar and Asta Vrečko details the architectural spaces of social interaction built after WWII in rural and suburban Slovenia, which continue to serve their purpose as local community centres to this day.

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Foster + Partners Imagines an Innovation and Community Center in the Swiss Alps

Foster + Partners has revealed images of InnHub La Punt, a new center for innovation in the heart of the Engadin valley, in the Swiss Alps. The 6,000-square-metre project, set for completion in 2022, is comprised of a 3-story building encompassing work and seminar spaces, sports facilities, retail shops, and a restaurant. Based on the idea of the ‘third place’, the intervention creates a space for collaboration and creativity.

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A Look into Vietnamese Vernacular Construction: 1+1>2 Architect’s Rural Community Houses

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This year the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) has been looking at tourism as a way to create jobs and opportunities in rural areas under the banner of Tourism and Rural Development.

Rural based Architecture and traditional edifices play an important role in showcasing local heritage building and craftsmanship. It can also offer jobs and prospects outside of big cities particularly for the communities that might otherwise be left behind. 

KPF Receives Planning Consent to Transform Former Chelsea Police Station into Social and Community Facility

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) has just received planning consent for Lucan Place in Chelsea, a mixed-use project that provides new homes, nursery, and specialist educational accommodation. The project, a redevelopment of the site of the former Chelsea Police Station, will generate a total of 31 new homes, as well as social and community functions.

Community Centers for Displaced Populations

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Through the past few months, the importance of community interaction and mental well-being has been felt by all. Yet, the need for a support system and constant reassurance has been a recurrent issue for much longer for forcibly displaced populations. Adding to the current health fears these communities, estimated at nearly 70.8 million ( 25.9 refugees only) around the world, struggle with traumas, mental health issues and have much difficulty in adapting to temporary or permanent foreign settings.