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Berlin: The Latest Architecture and News

Insola Floating Installation / Federico Forestiero + Fiete Wulff

© Kan Suzuki© Kan Suzuki© Kan Suzuki© Federico Forestiero+ 18

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  12
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Fundermax, Farben Kacza, Holzposslinger, Technus Schwimmsysteme

Yorck Kino Passage Cinema / Batek Architekten

© Marcus Wend© Marcus Wend© Marcus Wend© Marcus Wend+ 21

Berlin, Germany, Germany
  • Architects: Batek Architekten
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  325
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021

"I Wanted to Look at Places in a New Three-Dimensional Way": In Conversation with Daniel Libeskind

Jewish Museum Berlin. Image © Hufton+Crow
Jewish Museum Berlin. Image © Hufton+Crow

Daniel Libeskind (b. 1946, Lodz, Poland) studied architecture at Cooper Union in New York, graduating in 1970, and received his post-graduate degree from Essex University in England in 1972. While pursuing a teaching career he won the 1989 international competition to design the Jewish Museum in Berlin before ever realizing a single building. He then moved his family there to establish a practice with his wife Nina and devoted the next decade to the completion of the museum that opened in 2001. The project led to a series of other museum commissions that explored such notions as memory and history in architecture.

Jewish Museum Berlin. Image © Hufton+CrowVilnius Museum. Image © Hufton+CrowRoyal Ontario Museum. Image © Alex FradkinDenver Art Museum. Image © BitterBredt+ 20

The Zalando BHQ-Z Building Designed by HENN Tops Out in Berlin

HENN’s Zalando BHQ-Z Building topped out in Berlin and, once completed, will strengthen the city’s identity as a tech hub. The project is the last structure to be built within the HENN’s three-building headquarter complex for Zalando. The design reinterprets the traditional Berlin block through a Z-shaped plan that transforms the usually private, interior courtyard into an inviting public space. At the same time, the building’s voids create a dialogue with the surrounding built environment.

Who Is Diébédo Francis Kéré? 15 Things to Know About the 2022 Pritzker Architecture Laureate

"I just wanted my community to be a part of this process," Diébédo Francis Kéré said in an ArchDaily interview published last year. It's hard to think of another phrase that so well sums up the modesty and impact caused by the newest winner of the Pritzker Prize of Architecture, whose work gained notoriety precisely for involving the inhabitants of his village in the construction of works that combine ethical commitment, environmental efficiency, and aesthetic quality.

Benga Riverside School. Cortesia de Francis Kéré Village Opera. Cortesia de Francis KéréSarbalé Ke Pavilion. Foto © Iwan BaanLycée Schorge. Cortesia de Francis Kéré+ 20

Francis Kéré Receives the 2022 Pritzker Architecture Prize

The 2022 laureate of architecture’s highest honor, the Pritzker Architecture Prize is Diébédo Francis Kéré, known as Francis Kéré, Burkina Faso-born architect, educator, social activist, receiver of the 2004 Aga Khan Award for Architecture and designer of the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion. Recognized for “empowering and transforming communities through the process of architecture”, Kéré, the first black architect to ever obtain this award, works mostly in areas charged with constraints and adversity, using local materials and building contemporary facilities whose value exceeds the structure itself, serving and stabilizing the future of entire communities.

“Through buildings that demonstrate beauty, modesty, boldness, and invention, and by the integrity of his architecture and geste, Kéré gracefully upholds the mission of this Prize,” explains the official statement of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Announced today by Tom Pritzker, Chairman of The Hyatt Foundation, Francis Kéré is the 51st winner of the award founded in 1979, succeeding Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal. Praised “for the gifts he has created through his work, gifts that go beyond the realm of the architecture discipline”, the acclaimed architect is present equally in Burkina Faso and Germany, professionally and personally.

Sarbalé Ke Pavilion / Kéré Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan2017 Serpentine Pavilion . Image © Iwan BaanPrimary School in Gando Extension / Kéré Architecture. Image © Erik-Jan OuwerkerkGando Teacher's Housing / Kéré Architecture. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk+ 23

Explore Architecture Studios from Around the World Through the Lens of Marc Goodwin

Moving forward with his "ultra-marathon of photoshoots", architectural photographer Marc Goodwin is putting together an Atlas of Architectural Atmospheres by Arcmospheres, a project that seeks to document diverse architecture and design studios from around the world. Since 2016, the architectural photographer has been traveling "far and wide to capture the atmospheres of architecture studios in order to produce an online and print resource for the architecture community", and after a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, Goodwin resumed his project with an exploration of Berlin's architecture offices, capturing the work environment of renowned firms such as Hesse, LAVA, JWA, and FAR frohn&rojas, to name a few.

archi5 - Paris. Image © Marc GoodwinJägnefält Milton - Stockholm . Image © Marc GoodwinESTUDIO CARME PINOS - Barcelona. Image © Marc GoodwiniArc Architects - Seoul. Image © Marc Goodwin and Felix Nybergh+ 21

Original Feelings Yoga Studio / Some Place Studio

© Linus Muellerschoen© Linus Muellerschoen© Linus Muellerschoen© Linus Muellerschoen+ 22

  • Architects: Some Place Studio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  300
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Backhausen, Bisley, Thyssen Group

Tegel Quartier / Max Dudler

© Stefan Müller
© Stefan Müller

© Stefan Müller© Stefan Müller© Stefan Müller© Stefan Müller+ 8

Studios Frobenstraße 1 / BOLLES+WILSON

© Aya Schamoni© Aya Schamoni© Aya Schamoni© Aya Schamoni+ 33

Is Fake the New Real? Searching for an Architectural Reality

Excerpt from the book: Real and Fake in Architecture–Close to the Original, Far from Authenticity? (Edition Axel Menges)

The term “fake” has been in the media frequently in the early 21st century, referring to headlines and fictional statements that are perceived as real and are influencing public opinion and action. Replacing the historically more common term “propaganda,” fake news aims at misinformation and strives to “damage an agency, entity, or person, and/or gain financially or politically, often using sensationalist, dishonest, or outright fabricated headlines.” Tracing fake news and differentiating “real” information from personal opinions and identifying intentional (or unintentional) deceit can be complicated. It is similarly complex to trace the duality of fake and real in the built world. To explore the larger context of fake statements in architecture and environmental design, a look at the definition of fake and related terms might be necessary.

Am Römerberg 19-27 as seen from Römerberg from the southeast, Frankfurt/Main, Germany, 2011. Image by Simsalabimbam, distributed under a CC-BY-SA-4.0 license. Image Courtesy of Real and Fake in Architecture–Close to the Original, Far from Authenticity?St. Mark’s Campanile, Venice, Italy, 1514. image by Luka Aless, distributed under a CC-BY 2.0 license.. Image Courtesy of Real and Fake in Architecture–Close to the Original, Far from Authenticity?Simulation of Stadtschloss, Berlin Germany 1994. Image by FkMohr, distributed under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license.. Image Courtesy of Real and Fake in Architecture–Close to the Original, Far from Authenticity?Eiffel Tower Tianducheng, SkyCity, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, 2007. Image by MNXANL, distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.. Image Courtesy of Real and Fake in Architecture–Close to the Original, Far from Authenticity?+ 16

Holiday House Hof Ahmen / Atelier Sunder-Plassmann

Courtesy of Atelier Sunder-PlassmannCourtesy of Atelier Sunder-PlassmannCourtesy of Atelier Sunder-PlassmannCourtesy of Atelier Sunder-Plassmann+ 38

Berlin, Germany
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Eiermann, Knoll

The Graphic Novel as Architectural Narrative: Berlin and Aya

The comic strip, la bande dessinée, the graphic novel. These are all part of a medium with an intrinsic connection to architectural storytelling. It’s a medium that has long been used to fantasise and speculate on possible architectural futures, or in a less spectacular context, used as a device to simply show the perspectival journey through an architectural project. When the comic strip meshes fiction with architectural imagination, however, it’s not only the speculation on future architectural scenarios that takes place. It’s also the recording and the critiquing of the urban conditions of either our contemporary cities or the cities of the past.

From Berlin by Jason Lutes. Image Courtesy of Drawn & QuarterlyFrom Berlin by Jason Lutes. Image Courtesy of Drawn & QuarterlyFrom Berlin by Jason Lutes. Image Courtesy of Drawn & QuarterlyFrom Aya: Life in Yop City by Marguerite Abouet and Clément Oubrerie, translated by Helge Dasche. Image Courtesy of Drawn & Quarterly+ 14

Footbridge on the water Residential Building / LOVE architecture and urbanism

© Jasmin Schuller
© Jasmin Schuller

© Jasmin Schuller© Jasmin Schuller© Jasmin Schuller© Jasmin Schuller+ 21

Rules of the Road for Becoming a More Bike-Dependent City

Proposal for Car-Free Times Square in New York City. Image via 3deluxe
Proposal for Car-Free Times Square in New York City. Image via 3deluxe

Over the last century, cars have been the dominant element when designing cities and towns. Driving lanes, lane expansions, parking garages, and surface lots have been utilized as we continue our heavy reliance on cars, leaving urban planners to devise creative ways to make city streets safe for pedestrians and cyclists alike. But many cities, especially a handful in Europe, have become blueprints for forward-thinking ideologies on how to design new spaces to become car-free and rethink streets to make them pedestrian-friendly. Are we experiencing the slow death of cars in urban cores around the world in favor of those who prefer to walk or ride bikes? And if so, how can it be done on a larger scale?