Federico Babina’s Latest Archi-Illustrations: Classic National Architecture (With A Twist)

©

Our very talented friend Federico Babina has been responsible for some of ArchDaily’s most popular posts lately. The creativity behind his ARCHISET, ARCHIMACHINE, ARCHIPORTRAIT, ARCHIST, ARCHIBET and ARCHICINE have garnered thousands of shares on social media. Since we loved Babina’s serialized architectural illustrations, we were thrilled when he saw his latest set: the ArchDaily logo imagined in and around the world’s classic architecture. Read on for our interview with the architect and graphic designer. 

ArchDaily: Can you introduce yourself?
Federico Babina: My name is Federico Babina. I am an Italian architect and graphic designer (since 1994) that lives and works in Barcelona (since 2007). But mostly I’ve been a curious person (since forever).

AD: What’s an interesting fact about you?
FB: Every day I try to rediscover a way to observe the world through the eyes of a child. Children are able to have a vision of things totally uninhibited and without the conditioning of the experience. Children’s drawings are always amazing and beautiful in their spontaneous simplicity and clarity. I like trying to explain the world I see through different techniques of expression. I like the richness of the language and the diversity of its forms. I do not want to confine me in a prison of a style or shape.

AD: In what ways does your training as an architect affect your style as an illustrator?
FB: Any architect has to explain his projects through illustration and drawing. Design is the first way to give shape and body to a project. In this sense every architect should be a graphic designer. I was born with illustration. It’s been part of my life since I was a child. I started with book stories, I passed through the comics and then I arrived to architecture. Drawing and illustration and making architectural projects are, for me, one of the ways to recount and capture thoughts, feelings and emotions. Every project has a story and every project is a witness of a story. I ‘m fascinated by the idea of being able to blend the world of architecture and illustration: transform the architecture in an illustration and illustrations in an architecture.

(more…)

Winners of the 2014 Building of the Year Awards

We are happy to present the winners of the 2014 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards, a peer-based, crowdsourced, architecture award where the collective intelligence of 60,000 architects filter and recognize the best architecture featured on during the past year.

This group of buildings is unique in several aspects, in their spatial qualities and materials, yes, but also in terms of what they represent for the communities they serve. Each of these projects, in their own special way, solve unique social/environmental/economic challenges, and in so doing impart knowledge and inspiration to architects around the world. This is exactly our mission. So thank you, thanks for being a part of this amazing process, where the global voices of architects unite into one, strong, intelligent, forward-thinking message.

The practices with the most votes, and therefore the winners of the HP Designjet T520 ePrinter are Auburn University Rural Studio and Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade. The winners of the iPad Minis are Alexander Munn and Kirsten Martins.

2014 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards: The Finalists

After an intense week of nominations, the collective intelligence of ArchDaily has evaluated over 3,500 projects and narrowed down the list to 5 finalists per category.

We were very happy to see the level of participation from our readers – over 15,000 individuals expressed what architecture means to them through the buildings they chose.

And we have to congratulate you, as the finalists are outstanding. From all over the world, by firms of all sizes and trajectories, ranging from community-built projects to large scale complex programs, these buildings all have one thing in common: excellent architecture that can improve people’s lives.

You can vote for your favorite projects starting today and until January 30th, 2014 (read the complete rules).

Remember that the two projects with the most votes will receive an HP Designjet T520 ePrinter, and that we are going to give away two iPad Minis to our readers during the final voting stage.

The winners of the two iPad Minis from the nomination stage are: Shelby Nease and Kristen Johnson (you’ll receive an email shorty).

Make your voice heard – vote for your favorite projects for the 2014 Building of the Year Awards!

ArchDaily Interns Needed for Fall 2013

UPDATE: Submissions now closed. ArchDaily is looking for some awesome, architecture-obsessed Interns to join our team for Fall 2013 (August 19th – December 6th)! If you want to research/write about the best architecture around the globe – and find out what it takes to work for the world’s most visited architecture website – then read on after the break…

(more…)

ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards 2012: The Finalists

After two intense weeks, with 40,000 nominations, the collective intelligence formed by the readers of has scrutinized close to 3,000 projects, creating the shortlist that now moves into the final voting stage.

As in previous years, we have to congratulate our readers, as the finalists are outstanding. Buildings from all over the world, by firms of all sizes and trajectories, ranging from social buildings with no budget to state of the art buildings. But they all have something in common: good architecture that can improve people’s lives.

You can vote for your favorite projects starting today and until February 13th, 2013 (read the complete rules).

Remember that the project with the most votes will receive an HP Designjet T520 ePrinter and the project with the 2nd most votes will receive an HP Designjet T120 ePrinter from our sponsor HP.

The winners of the iPad Minis that we are giving away during the nomination process are: Sunil Bald and Susana Carls (you’ll receive an email shorty). And remember that we are giving away two iPads during the final voting round!

Meet the finalists:

(more…)

ArchDaily 2012 Building of the Year Awards

For the 4th consecutive year, we are proud to announce the Awards. During the past year we continued to grow, reaching over 280,000 daily visitors and close to 70 million page views per month. We also expanded our ever-growing network of architects on social media: 640,000 fans on Facebook, 105,000 followers on Twitter, 40,000 followers on Instagram and more than 100,000 photos contributed to our Flickr group.

But is more than numbers. The world faces fundamental problems, related to health, energy, climate, and more. And almost all these problems are related to the built environment.

We launched ArchDaily Mexico this year, which joins ArchDaily, ArchDaily Brasil and Plataforma Arquitectura in our mission to improve the quality of life for the 3 billion people who will live in cities in the next 40 years. How can we do this? By providing the inspiration, tools and knowledge to the architects who will face this challenge. By connecting the traditional hot-spots of architectural production with emerging economies (where a lot of innovation is happening). We believe that, in this way, the constant iteration of architecture will accelerate and result in better and faster solutions to the world’s issues.

That’s why the Building of the Year Awards are so important for us. It is a peer-based award process that identifies and recognizes projects with impact. It will be up to you, the architect, to nominate and choose the winners for each category. It will be up to you to be a part of a collective intelligence that will judge more than 2,700 projects – a scope we think is unprecedented in the world of architecture.

The task is up to you.

For the next 4 weeks, you’ll be in charge of nominating buildings for the shortlist, and then voting for the winners. We will give away iPad Minis and 4th Generation iPads for voters, and will include amazing plotters (courtesy of our friends from HP) for the firms behind the two projects with the most votes.

Rules at a glance: During the nominating stage, each registered user of the My ArchDaily platform will be able to nominate once per day for their favorite projects (published between Jan 1st 2012 and Dec 31st 2012), the counter resets at midnight EST. This stage starts on Jan 15th and ends on Jan 29th at 11:59PM.  After this, five projects per category will move into the voting stage, starting January 30th and ending on February 13th. The winner will be announced on February 14th. Start voting here.

You can review last year’s awarded projects in our free iPad App.

Detailed rules after the break:

(more…)

Happy Holidays from the Architects!

ahA+

During the past few days, we have received many e-cards from the offices, architects and photographers that are part of the ArchDaily network. Images from their offices, new buildings, ongoing projects, and even a video, are part of the many xmas greetings we selected to share with you.

After the break, 85 architectural ways of saying: Merry !

(more…)

ArchDaily v2.5: Less is More, our new design

Dear readers,

 is done by architects, for architects. This means that there are architects taking decisions on every level, from the daily curation of projects, to the coding and design of our website.

ArchDaily’s design has stayed practically the same since we started in May 2008, and today we are happy to announce our long due redesign: ArchDaily version 2.5 code name Less is More.

In this version we are presenting a less cluttered, easy to read and more intuitive interface. We have done a tremendous effort to reduce the amount of paths and decisions, as the Less is Moreconcept mastered by Mies van der Rohe has taught us. A tremendous challenge, that made us understand the essence of what we do and what is important to you.

But why v2.5 and no v3.0? While Less is More looks like a very different interface, the structure of the data and gallery browsing are practically the same. And those are the fundamental parts that are currently being developed by our team of engineers and architects, which we expect to release during Q4 2012. This will mean that projects will be available with rich meta data that will allow you to find that wood cabin in front of a lake you have been trying to find, in just a few clicks. And that the image galleries will be blazing fast and adapt to your screen, and your device (hint: tablet and mobile!). On this release we are also exposing our global network: at the top you’ll find a flag to jump to ArchDaily Brasil, ArchDaily Mexico and Plataforma Arquitectura (ArchDaily en Español), a network with more than 7 million visitors per month.

We are in front of a big challenge, and we wanted to put out this revised version after our experience with ArchDaily Brasil and ArchDaily Mexico, as we know that your feedback during these months will help us deliver the best v3.0 possible, making ArchDaily a better tool for you, aligned with our mission:

To improve the quality of life of the next 3 billion people that will move into cities in the next 40 years, by providing inspiration, knowledge and tools to the architects who will have the challenge to design for them. 

Please leave your feedback in the comments section below or through our contact form.

Thanks!

David Assael, and the whole team at ArchDaily

ArchDaily at the Center for Architecture! Going Viral: Blurred Borders

Via AIANY

Mark your calendars! In less than three weeks, ArchDaily founders David Basulto and David Assael will join Bjarke Ingels of BIG, Toru Hasegawa of Morpholio and Columbia University, and Carlo Aiello of eVolo for a lecture and panel discussion that will explore the impact of social media, technology and device culture on the way we design and practice. Moderated by , editor-in-chief of Architect, Going Viral is part of the AIANY 2012 Global Dialogues that has been dedicated to “uncovered connections” with the intention to investigate issues that are similarly impacting multiple regions, cultures and individuals. In addition, selected game changing blogs and websites will be exhibited as Voices Going Viral on the evening of the event.

Going Viral will take place at the NY Center for Architecture on May 21st at 6:00 pm. It is free to join, but please RSVP. Continue after the break for more information. (more…)

The Best of YOU: Our Top 3 Comments of the Month

We at  are used to picking the best buildings for you, dear readers, but we felt it was time to turn the tables a bit. The following is the best of you. You didn’t always agree with us, but you opined intelligently, and for that we salute you.

The Top 3 Comments in March 2012

3. From Community-Oriented Architecture in Schools: How ‘Extroverted’ Design Can Impact Learning and Change the World, about the potential of architecture to transform the lives of students in low-income communities.

 ”Imagine if we designed all public space as if we lived in a democracy. Imagine if we treated participation as a right. Imagine if this was part of the core curriculum in architecture schools.”

– Graeme Bristol

Our Number 1 Comment, after the break…

(more…)

The Multiplier Effect: How Design (and the Internet) Connects Us

Stop right there. Before I begin this post with a cliché dictionary definition, I direct you to what’s usually overlooked in these openings: the part of speech.

verb (used with object)

Without reading the definition, we know. Design is the act that connects the human being to the object outside him: the way in which intentions, thoughts, concepts take form.

On a basic level, design connects human beings through the shared experience of said object – be it functional or purely aesthetic. But it’s not just the object which connects us – it’s the idea that inspired it. On another level, and perhaps at its purest, design connects by inaugurating us into a collaborative spirit of innovation.

The ’s latest Design Conference, Design Connects, has invited bloggers to reflect how design connects us in a way that will build a better future. We at ArchDaily, biased as we may be, think we have the answer (it’s in the invitation): the Bloggers.

To read how design and the Internet connect us to thousands of elementary school kids, the sci-fi dsytopias of a NASA scientist, and a poverty-defying advocate looking to change the world  - all in 24 hours – keep reading after the break.  

David Assael and David Basulto, founders of ArchDaily, at Postopolis in Los Angeles, California © Courtesy of the Storefront Gallery

(more…)

ArchDaily 2011 Building of the Year Awards: The Winners

The year 2011 was a great one for , and all thanks to you. In terms of web traffic, in our network we grew to more than 200,000 daily readers who viewed 350 million pages during 2011. Our social media reach has grown to nearly 500,000 Facebook fans, more than 60,000 followers on Twitter and an ever growing presence on FlickrInstagramTumblr and Pinterest, all connecting with architects around our passion: Architecture.

As we said before, ArchDaily is more than just numbers. It is recognized as the ultimate source of inspiration for thousands of architects around the world, a community of professionals that once again has acted as the jury for the Awards.

After a two-stage voting process with more than 65,000 votes, our readers have recognized the best projects featured at ArchDaily during the past year. From renowned established offices to upcoming young practices, with one thing in common: good architecture.

Thanks to everyone who nominated and voted for their favorite buildings!

The winner of the iPad during the voting round is Fabiola Silva.

The project with the most votes and therefore the recipient of the HP Designjet T2300 eMFP printer, is the Füleky Winery by Építész Stúdió. 
 

ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards 2011: The Finalists

After two weeks and more than 30,000 nominations, we are proud to announce the finalists for the 2011 Building of the Year Award, a selection of the best projects made by our readers.

The shortlist for the awards includes 70 projects in 14 categories, a selection that shows the diversity of projects featured at during the past year. From small interiors to large scale buildings, designed by renowned practices and young architects, in different locations around the world.

I’d like to thank everyone who participated during the nominations round, as the finalists are outstanding.

You can vote for your favorite projects starting today and until March 6th at midnight EST (all the rules here):

http://www.archdaily.com/building-of-the-year/2011/

Your votes will give you the chance to win an iPad, same as Annie Wang who just won one for voting during the nominations round.

Remember: the office of the project with most votes during the final round will receive an HP Designjet T2300 eMFP printer.

During the process we worked very hard to log and flag every attempt to abuse the voting system, removing fake accounts and automated votes, and we wil continue to do so during this stage.

And the finalists are:

(more…)

ArchDaily 2011 Building of the Year Awards

The year 2011 was a great one for ArchDaily, and all thanks to you. In terms of web traffic, in our network we grew to more than 200,000 daily readers who viewed 350 million pages during 2011. Our social media reach has grown to nearly 500,000 Facebook fans, more than 60,000 followers on Twitter and an ever growing presence on Flickr, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest, all connecting with architects around our passion: Architecture.

ArchDaily is more than big numbers. It is recognized as the ultimate source of inspiration for thousands of architects around the world, who are covering new ground in architectural discussion, and generating new opportunities by being part of the world’s largest architecture network. During 2011, we participated in important events, such as the Pritzker Prize ceremony in DC, the AIA National Convention in New Orleans, among others, and visiting architects all across the US, in the UK, Switzerland, Israel, Brazil, Chile and Argentina. We’ve had the chance to interview renowned architects such as Steven Holl, Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, Peter Eisenman, and a long list of people who are advancing this profession. We spoke at the AIA Arkansas Convention, Harvard GSD, along with other events and schools. We launched our first local version, ArchDaily Brasil (more to come during this year!) and introduced our first tool to help architects collect and order information: My ArchDaily. We will continue to work very hard during 2012, with all our passion, to keep you connected to everything that is happening in the architecture world and help you with tools, as you will be the responsible of the noble task to shape our built environment.

Since 2009 we have held the Awards, an instance in which all of you make your voice heard by nominating and voting for the best projects featured on ArchDaily during the year. This is a peer based award that recognizes firms of all sizes, trajectories and locations. You can check the results of the previous editions here: 2009 and 2010.

Once again we have partnered with HP to present the 2011 Building of the Year Awards, starting today Feb 7th, 2012 at the following link:

http://www.archdaily.com/building-of-the-year/2011/

The nomination stage will run for 2 weeks until Feb 21st, 2011. All buildings featured under the available categories during 2011 are elegible for this round. You can nominate one building (in one category) per day.

Like last year, we will authenticate the votes with the My ArchDaily platform, so we can assure that the nominating and voting processes are conducted by the community. You can nominate once per day, so you can propose your favorite projects from Feb 7th to Feb 21st, after which 5 buildings per category will continue to the voting round, between Feb 22nd and Mar 6th. The winners will be announced on Mar 7th, 2012.

Given that you are in charge of the selection process, we have decided to give away 2 custom engraved iPads 2 during the nominating/voting stages (more details on the rules below). Also, the most voted firm will receive an HP Designjet T2300 eMFP printer (MSRP US$8,000).

Once again I’d like to thank all our readers for your support in 2011, and rest assure that we are working on new ways to improve ArchDaily in 2012. Our inbox is always open, so feel free to leave your feedback, recommendations and support on the contact page.

 

Rules after the break:

(more…)

Announcing ArchDaily Brasil

Dear readers,

Since the day we started back in 2008, we have stuck to our mission to become a hub of opportunities for architects, and to improve the profession by making architectural knowledge available to architects around the world.

To help keep you architecturally inspired, a passionate team of architects works hard every day to bring our readers from around the world the latest news, projects and any information that is relevant to the architecture world. Working on a global scale has required that we focus on broader aspects of the architectural world. While this has its obvious advantages, it can neglect one of the most important elements an architect has to deal on a daily basis: context.

We know that local issues and national contingencies have more weight over projects than global trends. While the Internet turned us into global citizens, it is now a tool that allows us to connect with the local in an unprecedented way. And at ArchDaily we wanted to provide our readers with the local information that is relevant to them.

We decided to start with , the cradle of one of the most powerful movements in architecture. The works by the Brazilian modern masters can be resumed into powerful structures with humble details, a constant that is now seen among the new generation of talented architects, who respect that tradition but are still able to innovate and give identity to Brazilian architecture. The country is also facing an unprecedented growth, and will host two of the largest events in the coming years, the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympics in Rio de janeiro, posing several challenges for architects and urbanists. In this context the local architecture scene has developed interesting projects in different scales, from where several lessons can be learned.

ArchDaily Brasil will have a special focus on everything that is happening in the country related to architecture, mixed with a selection of the best projects to keep Brazilian architects inspired and connected to a global network. Our editorial team of Brazilian architects and correspondants throughout the country strive to keep you informed in the best way possible, interviewing local architects, covering events and lectures, news, etc.

We invite our Brazilian readers to visit ArchDaily Brasil, and also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

We’d love to hear your feedback about ArchDaily Brasil, please leave any ideas, suggestions or recommendations in the comments section.

And stay tuned for more exciting news from ArchDaily.

Obrigado!

 

“When Blogs Plagiarize”: A message to our readers

Dear readers,

First of all, I’m sorry about my delay on sending you this update. For the last few weeks I’ve been on multiple planes traveling around the world, connecting with and interviewing architects in an attempt to give you, our readers, all of the latest projects and insights in the architecture world. From San Francisco to Arkansas, New York, London and Basel, in just a few days.

On September 18th, we featured a story titled “Harlem’s New Renaissance”. The article was taken from Jenna McKnight’s article “Harlem’s New Renaissance” featured on Arch Record on August 25th. ’s article written by Irina Vinnitskaya took the ideas proposed by Jenna and several of the quotes and information she used, accompanied by a link back to Architectural Record and photography credits, but failed to properly credit the person who came up with the original story idea, Jenna McKnight. Our mistake, a big one.

When Jenna noticed this (as Arch Record constantly reviews our content to syndicate it on their website and on their daily newsletter) she was very upset and contacted me immediately, but given my low email access due to travelling I saw the note a few hours later rather than instantaneously. Immediately upon receiving the email and noticing the improper crediting, I took down the article redirecting it back to Arch Record. In the meanwhile, Jenna posted a story on Arch Record stating that we plagiarized her story with all the given facts.

I reached out to Jenna, told her that there had been no bad intentions and gave her my apologizes as ArchDaily’s editor in chief and assumed my responsibility. Jenna replied, and she was ok with my apologies.

After that, a few blogs picked up on Jenna’s blog post and called this a “blog wars”, trying to add more fuel to the fire. Sadly none of them even asked us our side of the story, except for Sydney at StinkyJournalism.

Our mission at ArchDaily is to provide knowledge to architects around the world, and we will continue bringing you our highest quality of original content, along with information from other respected and useful sources we think will add value to our readers, always sticking to the best practices of fair use.

I hope that this doesn’t affect our relation with Arch Record, as we are both voices of the architecture world. As I mentioned before, Arch Record syndicates our content on their site and includes links on their newsletter (pointing to their site, not ours) citing ArchDaily as the source (but not crediting the specific author, failing to provide a byline). They stopped doing this as of last week.

Dear readers, our commitment is to every architect around the world. Rest assured that the passionate team of architects here at ArchDaily will do their best efforts to keep serving you, as you continue improving our world’s built environment.

-

Help us with our Architecture City Guide: Lisbon

Courtesy of Flickr CC License / catroga

Next week we will be taking our Architecture City Guide to Lisbon and we need your help. To make the City Guides more engaging we are asking for your input on which designs should comprise our weekly list of 12. In order for this to work we will need you, our readers, to suggest a few of your favorite modern/contemporary buildings for the upcoming city guide in the comment section below. Along with your suggestions we ask that you provide a link to an image you took of the building that we can use, the address of the building, and the architect. (The image must be from a site that has a Creative Common License cache like Flickr or Wikimedia. We cannot use images that are copyrighted unless they are yours and you give us permission.) From that we will select the top 12 most recommended buildings. Hopefully this method will help bring to our attention smaller well done projects that only locals truly know. With that in mind we do not showcase private single-family residences for obvious reasons. Additionally, we try to only show completed projects.

This week we are headed to Lisbon.

Example of the information we need for your suggestion:

Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown
Architect: Charles Correa Associates
Location: Pedrouços, Av. da Índia, Lisbon, Portugal
ww.flickr.com/photos/catroga/5502496721/sizes/z/in/photostream/
Photographer: catroga

Help us with our Architecture City Guide: Tokyo

Courtesy of Flickr CC License / localjapantimes

Next week we will be taking our Architecture City Guide to and we need your help. To make the City Guides more engaging we are asking for your input on which designs should comprise our weekly list of 12. In order for this to work we will need you, our readers, to suggest a few of your favorite modern/contemporary buildings for the upcoming city guide in the comment section below. Along with your suggestions we ask that you provide a link to an image you took of the building that we can use, the address of the building, and the architect. (The image must be from a site that has a Creative Common License cache like Flickr or Wikimedia. We cannot use images that are copyrighted unless they are yours and you give us permission.) From that we will select the top 12 most recommended buildings. Hopefully this method will help bring to our attention smaller well done projects that only locals truly know. With that in mind we do not showcase private single-family residences for obvious reasons. Additionally, we try to only show completed projects.

This week we are headed to Tokyo.

Example of the information we need for your suggestion:

Architect: Kisho Kurokawa
Location: 35°39′56.20″N 139°45′48.20″E
ww.flickr.com/photos/localjapantimes/4594773378/sizes/l/in/photostream/
Photographer: localjapantimes