1. ArchDaily
  2. Residential Architecture

Residential Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

What Makes a Home and How Do We Plan for its Future?

A home is one of the most significant architectural typologies that we experience throughout our lives. Largely serving as a significant private space, a home represents safety, ownership, and a sense of respite away from the rest of the world. It’s also historically been a place of routine, where we both begin and end our day, following the same patterns through different rooms of a home that we utilize. We can expect to sleep in our bedrooms, relax in a living room, cook in a kitchen, and eat in a dining room. 

House Plans Under 50 Square Meters: 30 More Helpful Examples of Small-Scale Living

Designing the interior of an apartment when you have very little space to work with is certainly a challenge. We all know that a home should be as comfortable as possible for its inhabitants, but when we have only a few square meters to work with and the essential functions of the home to distribute, finding an efficient layout is not easy. Following our popular selection of houses under 100 square meters, we've gone one better: a selection of 30 floor plans between 20 and 50 square meters to inspire you in your own spatially-challenged designs.

House Plans Under 50 Square Meters: 30 More Helpful Examples of Small-Scale Living - Image 1 of 4House Plans Under 50 Square Meters: 30 More Helpful Examples of Small-Scale Living - Image 2 of 4House Plans Under 50 Square Meters: 30 More Helpful Examples of Small-Scale Living - Image 3 of 4House Plans Under 50 Square Meters: 30 More Helpful Examples of Small-Scale Living - Image 4 of 4House Plans Under 50 Square Meters: 30 More Helpful Examples of Small-Scale Living - More Images+ 57

Adding Fresh Hanging Gardens to Residential Architecture

If ancient Hellenic sources are to be believed, hanging gardens have existed at least since antiquity when the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon were described by writers such as Herodotus and Philo of Byzantium. Today, vertical gardens have proliferated alongside the interest in indoor plants and gardens, especially in suitable climates. This trend in architecture reflects a simultaneous uptick in interest toward sustainability and a more pastoral, back-to-nature lifestyle. In the projects listed below, several of the architects mention moving forward from an industrial past—with its concomitant environmental effects—toward a better future, or at least a secluded, fresh, and natural outpost amidst the chaos of modern city life. Indoor gardens, and the visual allure of hanging plants and climbing vines, provide the setting for such a life. These vertical designs simultaneously conserve space and embed the plants within the atmosphere of the house, ensuring the space feels as much like a garden as it does a comfortable home.

Adding Fresh Hanging Gardens to Residential Architecture - Image 1 of 4Adding Fresh Hanging Gardens to Residential Architecture - Image 2 of 4Adding Fresh Hanging Gardens to Residential Architecture - Image 3 of 4Adding Fresh Hanging Gardens to Residential Architecture - Image 4 of 4Adding Fresh Hanging Gardens to Residential Architecture - More Images+ 23

"Architecture Can Be the Vehicle to Change How We Think About Traditional Typologies": In Conversation with BIG Partner, João Albuquerque

Keen to shape buildings and cities in Southern Europe, BIG has opened its latest office in Barcelona, Spain. Led by partner, João Albuquerque, the studio is seeking to create positive change and integrate into the city and the Spanish community. With a couple of projects spanning from the west to the east of the Mediterranean region, most notably Farfetch, and Fuse Valley campus in Portugal, the Joint Research Center in Sevilla for the European Commission, and the Gastronomy Open Ecosystem for Basque Culinary Center, BIG Barcelona is in constant evolution.

ArchDaily had the chance to talk to BIG Barcelona Partner João Albuquerque about the inception of the Barcelona office, his journey at BIG, and the firm's upcoming projects and involvement within the Spanish and Southern European markets.

"Architecture Can Be the Vehicle to Change How We Think About Traditional Typologies": In Conversation with BIG Partner, João Albuquerque - Imagem 1 de 4"Architecture Can Be the Vehicle to Change How We Think About Traditional Typologies": In Conversation with BIG Partner, João Albuquerque - Imagem 2 de 4"Architecture Can Be the Vehicle to Change How We Think About Traditional Typologies": In Conversation with BIG Partner, João Albuquerque - Imagem 3 de 4"Architecture Can Be the Vehicle to Change How We Think About Traditional Typologies": In Conversation with BIG Partner, João Albuquerque - Imagem 4 de 4Architecture Can Be the Vehicle to Change How We Think About Traditional Typologies: In Conversation with BIG Partner, João Albuquerque - More Images+ 25

A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interiors Submitted by the ArchDaily Community

Architects play an important role in creating healthy, functional and aesthetically pleasing environments. Interior design represents a natural continuation of the same prerogative, and its importance has been accentuated in recent years, from the lockdown forcing many people to remain indoors for extended periods of time, to the rise of remote work. The task of the interior designer is not decorating spaces, but planning for an effective use of space, understanding the needs of the user and highlighting the intrinsic qualities of a space. Acoustics, lighting, material properties and proportions all play a role in achieving a coherent and enjoyable interior space.

This week’s curated selection of Best Unbuilt Architecture highlights interior design projects submitted by the ArchDaily community. From a pastel-colored library in Turkey to a renovated symphony hall in San Diego, US, this selection of unbuilt projects showcases how architects design interior spaces by integrating textures, materials, light, and color in well-proportioned spaces. The article includes projects from Turkey, US, Switzerland, Indonesia, UK, and Denmark.

A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interiors Submitted by the ArchDaily Community - Image 9 of 4A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interiors Submitted by the ArchDaily Community - Image 30 of 4A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interiors Submitted by the ArchDaily Community - Image 45 of 4A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interiors Submitted by the ArchDaily Community - Image 6 of 4A Tropical Resort in Indonesia and a Countryside Villa in Birmingham: 9 Unbuilt Interiors Submitted by the ArchDaily Community - More Images+ 64

Brasília From Above: Aerial Videos by Joana França

If you haven't gotten a chance to visit Brasília, Joana França's photographic projects offer a comprehensive interpretation of the capital of South America's most populous country. França has dedicated a significant part of her career as an architecture photographer to the pursuit of amassing an impressive archive of images of the city planned by Lúcio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer.

We recently published an exceptional selection França's aerial photographs of Brasília divided by scale - residential, monumental, gregarious and bucolic. These overhead views solidify what, in theory, is already evident: the city lacks human scale, or the human scale of Brasília is just vast and (perhaps) not very human at all.

AD Classics: National Congress / Oscar Niemeyer

Located at the head of the abstract bird-shaped city plan by Lúcio Costa, and as the only building within the central greensward of the eastern arm of the Monumental Axis, the palace of the National Congress (Congresso Nacional) enjoys pride of place among Oscar Niemeyer’s government buildings in Brasília. The most sober of the palaces on the Plaza of the Three Powers, the National Congress reflects the strong influence of Le Corbusier, while hinting at the more romantic and whimsical forms that characterize Niemeyer’s trademark Brazilian Modernism.

AD Classics: National Congress / Oscar Niemeyer - Government AD Classics: National Congress / Oscar Niemeyer - Government AD Classics: National Congress / Oscar Niemeyer - Government AD Classics: National Congress / Oscar Niemeyer - Government AD Classics: National Congress / Oscar Niemeyer - More Images+ 8

The Residential, Monumental, Gregarious and Bucolic Scales of Lucio Costa's Brasilia

"What characterizes and gives meaning to Brasilia is a game of three scales... the residential or everyday scale... the so-called monumental scale, in which man acquires a collective dimension; the urbanistic expression of a new concept of nobility... Finally the gregarious scale, in which dimensions and space are deliberately reduced and concentrated in order to create a climate conducive to grouping... We can also add another fourth scale, the bucolic scale of open areas intended for lakeside retreats or weekends in the countryside." - Lucio Costa in an interview with Jornal do Brasil, November 8, 1961.

Photographer Joana França shared with us an impressive series of aerial photographs of the national capital of Brazil, Brasilia. The photoset is divided into four sub-series each presenting a scale: residential, monumental, gregarious and bucolic.

KPF Reveals Design for a Mixed-Use Neighborhood in Seoul, South Korea

International architecture office KPF has unveiled the design for Parkside Seoul, a new mixed-use neighborhood planned for the South Korean capital designed to complement the surrounding natural elements and pay homage to Yongsan Park. The 482,600 square meter development is composed of a layered exterior envelope that encompasses various programs and public amenities with the purpose of enhancing the residents’ experience of space. Besides the residential units, the complex includes office and retail spaces, and hospitality facilities along with public and green spaces.

KPF Reveals Design for a Mixed-Use Neighborhood in Seoul, South Korea - Image 1 of 4KPF Reveals Design for a Mixed-Use Neighborhood in Seoul, South Korea - Image 2 of 4KPF Reveals Design for a Mixed-Use Neighborhood in Seoul, South Korea - Image 3 of 4KPF Reveals Design for a Mixed-Use Neighborhood in Seoul, South Korea - Image 4 of 4KPF Reveals Design for a Mixed-Use Neighborhood in Seoul, South Korea - More Images+ 9

What Is a Pocket Door? Maximizing Space, Flexibility and Style

Once popular in Victorian architecture, pocket doors fell out of fashion in the mid-1920s and hinged doors soon became the norm. In recent years, however, a renewed interest in space-saving and design-forward solutions has brought pocket doors back into the limelight. What used to be an overlooked architectural feature is now becoming increasingly common in modern interiors, along with its creative flair and countless functions. These sleek, sliding doors can efficiently divide rooms, create seamless transitions, save space and contribute to a unique, sophisticated and stylish look. All of this while adding a slight touch of poetry to the home; sliding silently into the wall, pocket doors invite users to step through and explore what lies beyond, creating a strong sense of mystery and intrigue.

What Is a Pocket Door? Maximizing Space, Flexibility and Style - Image 1 of 4What Is a Pocket Door? Maximizing Space, Flexibility and Style - Image 2 of 4What Is a Pocket Door? Maximizing Space, Flexibility and Style - Image 3 of 4What Is a Pocket Door? Maximizing Space, Flexibility and Style - Image 4 of 4What Is a Pocket Door? Maximizing Space, Flexibility and Style - More Images+ 24

BIG and Safdie Architects Unveil Two Residential Towers in the Ecuadorian Capital

Quito-based developer Uribe Schwartzkopf unveiled two residential projects in the capital of Ecuador: IQON designed by Bjarke Ingels Group, and QORNER, by Safdie Architects. IQON represents BIG’s first project in South America and the tallest building in Quito. QORNER proposes a mix of residences of varying dimensions, complete with amenities such as private terraces, gyms, spas, and pools. To create an engaging interface with the city fabric, a mix of shops, restaurants, and commercial spaces are proposed at the street level.

BIG and Safdie Architects Unveil Two Residential Towers in the Ecuadorian Capital - Image 1 of 4BIG and Safdie Architects Unveil Two Residential Towers in the Ecuadorian Capital - Image 2 of 4BIG and Safdie Architects Unveil Two Residential Towers in the Ecuadorian Capital - Image 3 of 4BIG and Safdie Architects Unveil Two Residential Towers in the Ecuadorian Capital - Image 4 of 4BIG and Safdie Architects Unveil Two Residential Towers in the Ecuadorian Capital - More Images+ 6

Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials

According to a survey by the Brazilian Association for Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste (ABRECON), there has been an increase in the recycling of construction and demolition waste (C&D) in Brazil in recent years. According to the 2015 report, 21% of the total C&D was recycled in the country that year, while in 2013 the rate was 19%.

The outlook is promising but not yet ideal, and the growth of recycled C&D materials is still considered small. In Brazil, construction waste can represent between 50% and 70% of the total municipal solid waste. This means, we still need to advocate for a more common practice of material recycling and reuse in architecture, especially in Brazil.

Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials - Image 4 of 4Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials - Image 6 of 4Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials - Image 7 of 4Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials - Image 10 of 4Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials - More Images+ 6

7 Brazilian Country Houses and Their Strategies for Comfort and Sustainability

Country houses usually are found in remote areas, therefore, they often demand placement strategies that respect the context and dialogue with the landscape while bringing more thermal comfort and natural lighting. Most of the time, these solutions bring passive strategies that, along with the choice of materials and construction techniques, can provide an even more sustainable project. Get to know seven Brazilian residences that are examples of this theme.

7 Brazilian Country Houses and Their Strategies for Comfort and Sustainability - Image 1 of 47 Brazilian Country Houses and Their Strategies for Comfort and Sustainability - Image 2 of 47 Brazilian Country Houses and Their Strategies for Comfort and Sustainability - Image 3 of 47 Brazilian Country Houses and Their Strategies for Comfort and Sustainability - Image 4 of 47 Brazilian Country Houses and Their Strategies for Comfort and Sustainability - More Images+ 16