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3d Printing: The Latest Architecture and News

Zero Waste Lab 3D Prints Street Furniture from Household Plastic Waste 

13:00 - 16 January, 2019
Zero Waste Lab 3D Prints Street Furniture from Household Plastic Waste , Print Your City. Image © Stefanos Tsakiris
Print Your City. Image © Stefanos Tsakiris

The New Raw has launched the Zero Waste Lab in Thessaloniki, a research initiative where Greek citizens can upcycle plastic waste into urban furniture. Part of the larger Print Your City project, the project utilizes a robotic arm and recycling facilitates to create custom furniture pieces that close the plastic waste loop. The initiative aims to use flakes from recycled products to redesign public spaces within the cities.

Print Your City. Image © Stefanos Tsakiris Print Your City. Image © Stefanos Tsakiris Print Your City. Image © Stefanos Tsakiris Print Your City. Image © Stefanos Tsakiris + 26

World's Largest 3D-Printed Concrete Pedestrian Bridge Completed in China

11:00 - 16 January, 2019
World's Largest 3D-Printed Concrete Pedestrian Bridge Completed in China, © Professor Xu Weiguo
© Professor Xu Weiguo

The world’s longest 3D-printed concrete pedestrian bridge has been completed in Shanghai. Designed by Professor Xu Weiguo from the Tsinghua University (School of Architecture) - Zoina Land Joint Research Center for Digital Architecture, the 26.3-meter-long bridge was inspired by the ancient Anji Bridge in Zhaoxian, China.

The single-arch structure was created using a 3D printing concrete system developed by Professor Xu Weiguo’s team, integrating digital design, cost efficiency, smart technology, and architectural dynamism. Enclosing the 3.6-meter width, the bridge’s handrails are shaped like flowing ribbons on the arch, creating a light, elegant movement across the Shanghai Wisdom Bay pond.

© Professor Xu Weiguo © Professor Xu Weiguo © Professor Xu Weiguo © Professor Xu Weiguo + 20

The Golden Age of 3D Printing: Innovations Changing the Industry

07:30 - 11 January, 2019
The Golden Age of 3D Printing: Innovations Changing the Industry, © © Universal Favourite
© © Universal Favourite

3D printing itself is no longer a new technology, but that hasn’t stopped researchers and innovators around the world from coming up with new applications and opportunities. Some experiments with new materials have been driven by sustainability concerns and others are simply the result of imagination and creativity. Others have chosen to invest their time utilizing more traditional materials in new ways. Materials, however, are just the beginning. Researchers have developed new processes that allow the creation of objects that were previously impossible to print and, on a larger scale, new building typologies are being tested - including a Mars habitat!

Columbia University Creates 3D-Printed Timber Lookalike with Internal Grain Pattern

11:00 - 7 January, 2019
via Columbia University
via Columbia University

Researchers at New York’s Columbia University have unveiled a method of vibrantly replicating the external and internal structure of materials such as wood using a 3D printer and specialist scanning techniques. While conveying the external profile and patterns of natural objects is tried and tested, a major challenge in the 3D printing industry has been replicating an object’s internal texture.

In their recent study “Digital Wood: 3D Internal Color Texture Mapping” the research team describes how a system of “color and voxel mapping “led to the production of a 3D printed closely resembling the texture of olive wood, including a cut-through section.

via Columbia University via Columbia University via Columbia University via Columbia University + 6

École des Ponts ParisTech's Design by Data Program Merges Architecture with Engineering Science

02:30 - 7 January, 2019
École des Ponts ParisTech's Design by Data Program Merges Architecture with Engineering Science , via Design by Data
via Design by Data

In 2016, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech has established an advanced masters program with a focus on digital fabrication and robotics. Currently recruiting for its fourth installment, the Design by Data Advanced Masters Program appeals to architects, engineers, and tech-oriented designers. Since its launch in 2016, the program’s director Francesco Cingolani has sought to shape the relationship between architecture and technology by creating a cross-disciplinary culture between the two.

As previously mentioned on Archdaily, students study the main components of the program - computational design, digital culture and design, and additive manufacturing and robotic fabrication - throughout the 12-month program to fulfill Design by Data’s main objectives while working with peers in a dynamic learning environment. While providing each participant with both technical skills and an aesthetic eye, the program ensures students will also gain critical knowledge of current innovative trends and ongoing research. By exposing them to technology through hands-on use of tools of digital fabrication, the program will teach students to approach design through a process-oriented lens.

via Design by Data via Design by Data Makerspace. Image via Design by Data Makerspace. Image via Design by Data + 9

Zaha Hadid Architects and ETH Zurich Create 3D Knitted Concrete Pavilion Transportable via Suitcase

09:00 - 5 November, 2018
Zaha Hadid Architects and ETH Zurich Create 3D Knitted Concrete Pavilion Transportable via Suitcase, © Philippe Block via ZHA
© Philippe Block via ZHA

ETH Zurich, working in collaboration with Zaha Hadid Architects Computation and Design Group (ZHCODE) and Architecture Extrapolated (R-Ex) have unveiled a 3D-knitted shell serving as the primary shaping element for curved concrete structures.

The “KnitCandela” prototype represents the first application of this technology at an architectural scale, a five-tonne concrete structure on display at the Museo Universitario Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City.

© Juan Pablo Allegre via ZHA © Leo Bieling via ZHA © Lex Reiter via ETH Zurich © Maria Verhulst via ETH Zurich + 14

World's First 3D-Printed Steel Bridge Takes Center Stage at Dutch Design Week

13:00 - 24 October, 2018
World's First 3D-Printed Steel Bridge Takes Center Stage at Dutch Design Week, MX3D Bridge. Image © Thijs Wolzak
MX3D Bridge. Image © Thijs Wolzak

Dutch robotics company MX3D have unveiled the world's first 3D printed stainless steel bridge at Dutch Design Week. Set to be installed across one of the oldest and most famous canals in the center of Amsterdam, the bridge was created with designer Joris Laarman. Now both the span and deck are complete. Equipping industrial robots with purpose-built tools, the project showcases the potential applications of multi-axis 3D printing technology.

MX3D Bridge. Image © Adriaan de Groot MX3D Bridge. Image © Adriaan de Groot MX3D Bridge. Image © Adriaan de Groot MX3D Bridge. Image © Adriaan de Groot + 7

Tonkin Liu Create Innovative Medical Device using their Signature Shell Lace Structure

09:00 - 16 October, 2018
Tonkin Liu Create Innovative Medical Device using their Signature Shell Lace Structure, Courtesy of Tonkin Liu
Courtesy of Tonkin Liu

Anna Liu and Mike Tonkin of London-based Tonkin Liu have developed an innovative medical device for use in patients’ windpipes. The prototype stent is based on the firm’s signature Shell Lace Structure, a “single-surface structural technology designed and developed through a decade of research for architectural and engineering applications.”

The 3D-printed prototype is 500 times smaller than those used by the firm for their architectural applications and was developed in collaboration with Arup and the Natural History Museum.

Courtesy of Tonkin Liu Courtesy of Tonkin Liu Courtesy of Tonkin Liu Courtesy of Tonkin Liu + 10

Dubai Plans for One Quarter of Buildings to be 3D Printed by 2025

14:00 - 28 August, 2018
Dubai Plans for One Quarter of Buildings to be 3D Printed by 2025, Dubai. Image via Creative Commons
Dubai. Image via Creative Commons

Dubai has launched 3D Printing Strategy, a global initiative to make the city the world's leader in 3D printing. The initiative is designed to promote the status of the UAE and Dubai as a leading hub of 3D printing technology. His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, has created the plan for one quarter of new buildings to be 3D printed by 2025. The strategy hopes to utilize 3D printing to cut costs in the medical and construction sector and restructure economies and labor markets.

Office of the Future by Killa Design. Image © WAM Office of the Future by Killa Design. Image © WAM Office of the Future by Killa Design. Image © WAM Office of the Future by Killa Design. Image © WAM + 5

How to Bring Construction into the Future

09:30 - 3 August, 2018
How to Bring Construction into the Future, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "The 4 Forces That Will Take on Concrete and Make Construction Smart."

When it comes to building a bridge, what prevents it from having the most enduring and sustainable life span? What is its worst enemy? The answer is, simply, the bridge itself—its own weight.

Built with today’s construction processes, bridges and buildings are so overly massed with energy and material that they’re inherently unsustainable. While concrete is quite literally one of the foundations of modern construction, it’s not the best building material. It’s sensitive to pollution. It cracks, stains, and collapses in reaction to rain and carbon dioxide. It’s a dead weight: Take San Francisco’s sinking, leaning Millennium Tower as an example.

Modern, smart construction can and will do better. A convergent set of technologies will soon radically change how the construction industry builds and what it builds with.

NASA Endorses AI SpaceFactory's Vision for 3D Printed Huts on Mars

11:00 - 25 July, 2018
NASA Endorses AI SpaceFactory's Vision for 3D Printed Huts on Mars, Marsha could be grouped into small clusters. Image Courtesy of Plompmozes
Marsha could be grouped into small clusters. Image Courtesy of Plompmozes

AI SpaceFactory has released details of their proposed cylindrical huts for the Planet Mars, designed as part of the 3D Printed Habitat Challenge organized by NASA. Project MARSHA (Mars HAbitat) was endorsed by NASA with a top prize of almost $21,000, one of five designs selected from a field of seventeen.

The competition asked participants to design an effective habitat for a crew of four astronauts to be located on the Red Planet, using construction techniques enabled by 3D printing. The submitted schemes were then ranked based on their innovation, architectural layout, and level of detail in BIM modeling.

Astronauts observe the construction of a new habitat. Image Courtesy of Plompmozes Marsha protects humans from the harsh Martian environment, including the frigid temperatures, dust storms and radiation. Image Courtesy of Plompmozes Marsha’s architectural design is integrated with its lighting design, which automatically changes in sync with the time of day and the color and intensity of light. Image Courtesy of Plompmozes Marsha’s two- shell structure creates flexible, hybrid spaces which offer a variety of lighting conditions, privacy, noise levels and uses. Image Courtesy of Plompmozes + 26

WORKac Designs an 'Invisible' Penthouse in a Centuries-Old Cast-Iron Building

06:00 - 12 June, 2018
WORKac Designs an 'Invisible' Penthouse in a Centuries-Old Cast-Iron Building, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

At first glance, The Stealth Building looks like a pristinely-restored cast iron apartment building. That’s because technically, it is. But upon closer inspection, the Lower Manhattan building is rife with innovative restoration and renovation practices by WORKac.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 23

Co-Living, Custom-Order Homes, and Creative Economies: Is This the Future of High-Density Housing?

09:30 - 24 April, 2018
Co-Living, Custom-Order Homes, and Creative Economies: Is This the Future of High-Density Housing?, Architecture students use space-age materials and radical designs to imagine tomorrow’s urban housing centers. Image Courtesy of Design Research Laboratory
Architecture students use space-age materials and radical designs to imagine tomorrow’s urban housing centers. Image Courtesy of Design Research Laboratory

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Customizable Communities Could Be the Key to the Future of Urban Housing."

London has a fascinating history of urbanization that stretches back to Roman settlement in 43 AD. During the Industrial Revolution and Victorian Era, the city’s population peaked, as did its problems related to population density. The air was filled with soot and smoke, crowded slums were the norm in the inner city, and cholera and other epidemics spread quickly due to inadequate sanitation.

These conditions gave rise to modern urban planning and public-health policy, which now must define what “good density” might look like in the future of urban housing. The UN predicts that by 2050, 66 percent of the world’s population will live in metropolitan areas, up from 54 percent today.

MX3D Completes Structural Span of World's First 3D Printed Metal Bridge

08:00 - 13 April, 2018
MX3D Completes Structural Span of World's First 3D Printed Metal Bridge, via MX3D
via MX3D

Late last year, we reported on the progress of world’s first 3D printed steel bridge designed by Netherlands-based MX3D. With the design now finalized, the start-up company has announced that the span of the bridge is now complete.

The final round of structural tests is expected to take place this summer, just three years after the project was first announced. After the structural integrity has been tested, the final design will be modified and the completion of the bridge will follow only a few months after. MX3D hopes to showcase the potential of their multi-axis 3D printer during the Dutch Design Week, and the first of its kind bridge is planned to be installed into its final location in a canal in Amsterdam sometime next year.

via MX3D via MX3D via MX3D via MX3D + 8

Campervan Breaks World Record for Largest Indoor 3D Print

14:00 - 25 March, 2018
Campervan Breaks World Record for Largest Indoor 3D Print, Courtesy of Create Cafe 3D Print
Courtesy of Create Cafe 3D Print

3D printing just got a whole lot more impressive. If we weren’t already enthralled by the bridges, homeless shelters and structural components that have been made possible through 3D printing, a Canadian team have managed to print the world’s first 3D printed campervan that beats records for the largest indoor 3D print ever – three times larger than the previous record holder. Made from hundreds of feet of plastic filament, the seamless camper measures 13 feet long and six feet wide and took over 230 hours to build on their custom ErectorBot 3D printer.

Interior Design and 3D Printing: Giving Unique Forms to Functional Spaces

09:30 - 22 March, 2018
Interior Design and 3D Printing: Giving Unique Forms to Functional Spaces, The Juice Bar in the Loft Flagship store in Ginza, Tokyo, was 3D printed. Image © DUS and Nacása&Partners Inc
The Juice Bar in the Loft Flagship store in Ginza, Tokyo, was 3D printed. Image © DUS and Nacása&Partners Inc

This article was originally published by Archipreneur as "3D Printing is Making Its Way into Interior Design."

3D printing – also known as additive manufacturing – turns digital 3D models into solid objects by building them up in layers. The technology was first invented in the 1980s and has since found its way into our everyday life – and in architecture and interior design. Architecture firm DUS has a vast expertise in architectural 3D printing and is now applying its expertise to interiors and retail spaces.

“3D printing is an ideal technique to tailor-produce to a space or a brand,” says Inara Nevskaya, head designer at DUS. “We can link a furniture’s functionality with unique form features to create statement pieces, special focal points that frame new experiences for the consumer in the retail landscape.”

Backyard Cabin Experiments With 3D-Printed Tiles as a Facade Material

09:30 - 18 March, 2018
Backyard Cabin Experiments With 3D-Printed Tiles as a Facade Material, The cabin is integrated into the landscape thanks to the hundreds of succulents and air plants that comprise the facade and are held by the 3D-printed hexagonal planter tiles. 3D-printed chairs and tables, also designed by Emerging Objects, serve as both indoor and outdoor furniture. Image © Matthew Millman
The cabin is integrated into the landscape thanks to the hundreds of succulents and air plants that comprise the facade and are held by the 3D-printed hexagonal planter tiles. 3D-printed chairs and tables, also designed by Emerging Objects, serve as both indoor and outdoor furniture. Image © Matthew Millman

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "Cutting-edge 3-D-printing pushes construction boundaries in an Oakland cabin."

The 3D-printed Cabin of Curiosities is a research endeavor and “proof of concept” investigation into the architectural possibilities of upcycling and custom 3D-printed claddings as a response to 21st-century housing needs.

This exploratory project is an output of Bay Area-based additive manufacturing startup Emerging Objects, founded by Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello, who are professors at the University of California Berkeley and San Jose State University, respectively. They also co-founded the architecture studio Rael San Fratello, whose work primarily focuses on architecture as a cultural endeavor.

The Chroma Curl wall is made of 3D-printed bio-plastic derived from corn. The textured surface creates a floral pattern throughout the interior. Image © Matthew Millman The clays used for the tiles are fired at a high temperature resulting in low porosity. Because the clay is recycled from a pottery studio, there is color differentiation in the surface. Image © Matthew Millman The seed stitch tiles explore the use of custom code to form a textured pattern that creates a micro-shading effect. Image © Matthew Millman Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the majority of the building. The calibrated inconsistencies and material behavior make each tile unique. Ever changing shadows transform the cabin’s surface throughout the day as each seed stitch tile is gently curved to receive the sun and cast shadows. Image © Matthew Millman + 11

Futuristic Illustrations Show What Architecture and Construction Will Look Like in 2030

08:00 - 18 February, 2018
Futuristic Illustrations Show What Architecture and Construction Will Look Like in 2030, via MIT Technology Review
via MIT Technology Review

In a world where technology is at the forefront of our lives, it’s hard to imagine that many of the jobs that are available now did not exist 10 years ago; uber drivers, social media managers, app developers and even the job of an ArchDaily writer would have seemed an abstract concept! As technology advances further, even more job positions will be created and others left behind, leaving it open to speculation as to what will come next.

It is almost impossible to predict the future, but digital agency AKQA and Mish Global have attempted the impossible and envisioned several potential jobs in the design and construction industry in 2030 following inspiration from several panels they attended at the World Economic Forum. With the speed of changes over the last decade, they don’t seem too far from reality either.