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ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : G-H-I

07:00 - 18 June, 2019
ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : G-H-I, © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

It is expected that within the next few of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it.

Since architects and designers carry a responsibility of building a substantial future, we have put together an A-Z list of every sustainability term that you might come across. Every week, a new set of letters will be published, helping you stay well-rounded on everything related to sustainable architecture and design. Here are the terms that start with letters G, H, and I.

21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture

04:00 - 18 June, 2019
21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture, The Offices of BIG. Image © © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
The Offices of BIG. Image © © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

Originally published by Entrepreneur Architect, Associate Professor at Louisiana Tech Kevin J Singh gives his 21-point rundown of how to have a successful and happy life as an architect. The list gives some pointers that will certainly help young students and graduates, but may well be useful to some of the not-so-young practitioners who need to refocus on what's important.

The following is a compilation of my professional practice lecture on the last day of class. Instead of recapping the course or giving a final exam, I share with my students a presentation titled Advice as You Finish School and Start to Practice. I present a series of statements followed up with a brief explanation.

Big Bang Brainstorm: Be Inspired by NASA’s Free Images of Outer Space

07:00 - 17 June, 2019
Big Bang Brainstorm: Be Inspired by NASA’s Free Images of Outer Space, © NASA
© NASA

Architects often look for inspiration in anything and everything around them: forms, volumes, artwork, music, nature… But some sources (and projects) are just out of this world. Literally.

NASA has created an online library of 140,000 high-resolution photos, videos, and sound clips, all free and available for download. Here is a selection of images for your dose of interstellar inspiration.

© NASA © NASA © NASA © NASA + 29

Natural Authentic, Lively and Unique Look - Swisspearl Largo Vintago

Sponsored Article
Natural Authentic, Lively and Unique Look - Swisspearl Largo Vintago, Courtesy of Swisspearl
Courtesy of Swisspearl

The mineral material of fiber cement combined with a sanded surface gives Vintago a natural authentic, lively and unique look.

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Follies and Monuments

08:00 - 16 June, 2019
Follies and Monuments, GWANGJURIVER READING ROOM. Image © Kyungsub Shin
GWANGJURIVER READING ROOM. Image © Kyungsub Shin

My commitment to pavilions—to the idea of making constructional follies—is connected with needing to develop prototypes and carry out constructional research away from the normal practice of architecture. Without being subject to a client’s brief, the pavilions give me an opportunity to develop and test different methodologies, which is something that has always interested me about teaching. They are investigations into various kinds of context, dealing with urban scenarios and landscapes—they are about making something in space for its own sake, when the guiding idea comes from a reading of place. The pavilions fine tune my engagement with a specific situation, allowing me to see what is essential in terms of an action or construction. I did not set out with the idea of working in series, but as different opportunities came up, the process of designing them became more organic, the language seemed to make sense, and as one thing reinforced another, they took on a life of their own. 

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Aerial Futures Explores the Future of Urban Air Mobility in New Video

06:00 - 16 June, 2019

Advances in technology have changed the way people work and move around congested cities. Since free space in these urban areas has become scarce, people have shifted their perspective upwards and are now looking to the sky for new means of mobility, transporting their goods via cargo drones and flying ‘taxis’.

Saint-Gobain Announces Winners of International Student Design Competition

10:00 - 15 June, 2019
Saint-Gobain Announces Winners of International Student Design Competition, "Co.Living" - Exterior view. Image Courtesy of Saint-Gobain
"Co.Living" - Exterior view. Image Courtesy of Saint-Gobain

Competing in this year’s 15th annual Multi Comfort Student Contest, Saint-Gobain had over 2,200 students from 199 universities worldwide. The final was narrowed down to 60 competing teams from 34 countries, all of whom traveled to Milan to present their designs to an international panel of experts from the Municipality of Milan. This year’s brief was to design a project to rehabilitate and reconnect the urban area around Crescenzago subway station in Milan in line with the city’s #milano2030 development plan. The competition also focuses on Saint-Gobain’s concept of Multi Comfort: thermal, visual, and acoustic comfort, as well as good indoor air quality.

"Urban Villa" - Exterior view. Image Courtesy of Saint-Gobain "Induction" - Exterior view. Image Courtesy of Saint-Gobain "Diversity in Regularity" - 3D Model. Image Courtesy of Saint-Gobain "Social Canopy" - Exterior view. Image Courtesy of Saint-Gobain + 21

Mayank Thammalla Transforms the Venetian Canals into an Architectural Canvas

06:00 - 15 June, 2019
Mayank Thammalla Transforms the Venetian Canals into an Architectural Canvas, © Mayank Thammalla
© Mayank Thammalla

Nothing is ordinary about the Italian city of Venice. Whether it is the vividly-colored architecture that dates back to Gothic and Byzantine eras, or the fact that the city is floating on water, culturally-rich Venice is an intriguing destination for people of all backgrounds and interests.

With every visit to Venice, London-based architect and photographer Mayank Thammalla found himself discovering new scenic views of the city, ones that are often tucked beneath its architecture. In his recent photographic series ‘Echoes of Venice’, Thammalla used the canal ripples as his canvas and displayed the deteriorating architecture of Venice from a unique, inverted perspective.

ArchDaily Topics - June: Travel

07:00 - 14 June, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - June: Travel, Courtesy of ArchDaily
Courtesy of ArchDaily

As architects, we are on an endless journey of discovery, open to new experiences that fuel our creativity. We explore our surroundings and beyond, we travel to expand our views and open our mind, being often exposed to the unexpected. All these experiences are stored in our mental hard drive until the inspiration moment comes, drawing random non-linear connections between them and putting us into a state of divergent thinking, from where new ideas appear. 

Continuity and Sensitivity Drive the Designs of Ricardo Bak Gordon

06:30 - 14 June, 2019
Continuity and Sensitivity Drive the Designs of Ricardo Bak Gordon, House in Boliqueime. Image Courtesy of bak gordon arquitectos
House in Boliqueime. Image Courtesy of bak gordon arquitectos

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

House in Boliqueime. Image Courtesy of bak gordon arquitectos FUTURE: Teatro Romano. Image Courtesy of bak gordon arquitectos Casa na Costa do Castelo. Image Courtesy of bak gordon arquitectos School Romanshorn. Image Courtesy of bak gordon arquitectos + 24

Dead Fish on the Beach: the Problem with “Women in Architecture”

04:00 - 14 June, 2019
Dead Fish on the Beach: the Problem with “Women in Architecture”, Courtesy of Matri-Archi(tecture)
Courtesy of Matri-Archi(tecture)

Eyes of the City: Seeing and Designing Beyond the Human / Jeanne Gang for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

07:00 - 13 June, 2019
Eyes of the City: Seeing and Designing Beyond the Human / Jeanne Gang for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, The eyes of the more than 250 animal species who have been observed at Studio Gang’s Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago. Image by Studio Gang
The eyes of the more than 250 animal species who have been observed at Studio Gang’s Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago. Image by Studio Gang

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT.

“We all live in an ecosystem; we just don’t know it. When it comes to urban areas, people have an ecological blind spot.” — Seth Magle, Director, Lincoln Park Zoo Urban Wildlife Institute, Chicago.

The advance of AI technologies can make it feel as if we know everything about our cities—as if all city dwellers are counted and accounted for, our urban existence fully monitored, mapped, and predicted.

6 Steps for Designing Healthy Cities

06:05 - 12 June, 2019
6 Steps for Designing Healthy Cities,  “Atelier Stad Breda”, 2015. In the image a series of design strategies touching upon energy, ecology and economy come together.
“Atelier Stad Breda”, 2015. In the image a series of design strategies touching upon energy, ecology and economy come together.

By some estimates, cities consume over two-thirds of the world’s energy, and account for more than 70% of global CO2 emissions: a figure sure to increase as the global migration from rural to urban areas continues. In the pursuit of exploring new models for how healthy cities could more effectively sustain these demands, Dutch design and research studio FABRICations has investigated how cities of the Netherlands can reduce carbon emissions through new design-led approaches.

Open More Doors: TOPOTEK 1

04:01 - 11 June, 2019
Open More Doors: TOPOTEK 1, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © ArchDaily © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 20

We are delighted to introduce Open More Doors, a new section by ArchDaily and the MINI Clubman that will take you behind the scenes of the world’s most innovative offices through exciting video interviews and an exclusive photo gallery featuring each studio’s workspace.

Düsseldorf University's Brutalist Architecture Through the Lens of Luciano Spinelli

08:00 - 9 June, 2019
Düsseldorf University's Brutalist Architecture Through the Lens of Luciano Spinelli, © Luciano Spinelli
© Luciano Spinelli

Although Brutalist architecture is often criticized for its raw, unfinished look, it has been frequently used in the design of public buildings, with many becoming iconic landmarks. Some architects chose to break away from typical concrete structures and implemented a pop of color on the walls, window frames, and flooring, adding some dynamism to the monotonous palette.

Shot with a Leica M6 film camera, architecture and interior design photographer Luciano Spinelli photographed the Düsseldorf University campus, displaying the contrast between its brutalist architecture and vibrant design features.

The Ultimate List of Sites Declared World Heritage in Mexico

10:00 - 8 June, 2019
The Ultimate List of Sites Declared World Heritage in Mexico, Vista del Conjunto de Teotihuacán desde la Pirámide de la Luna. Jackhynes [Public domain]. Image via Wikimedia Commons
Vista del Conjunto de Teotihuacán desde la Pirámide de la Luna. Jackhynes [Public domain]. Image via Wikimedia Commons

Centro Histórico de Guanajuato. Tomas Castelazo [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]. Image via Wikimedia Commons Convento Santo Domingo de Guzmán ubicado en el Centro Histórico de Oaxaca. El Ágora [Public domain]. Image via Wikimedia Commons Pirámide de los Nichos ubicada en la Ciudad Prehispánica del Tajín. AlejandroLinaresGarcia [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)]. Image via Wikimedia Commons Templo y Convento de San Mateo Apóstol. Miandigra [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]. Image via Wikimedia Commons + 37

According to a statement published on the UNESCO page, the UNESCO World Heritage List is a legacy of monuments and sites of great natural and cultural wealth that belongs to all of humanity. The Sites inscribed on the World Heritage List fulfill a function of milestones on the planet, of symbols of the awareness of States and peoples about the meaning of those places and emblems of their attachment to collective property, as well as of the transmission of that heritage to future generations.

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

05:00 - 8 June, 2019
Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

S.C. Johnson and Son Administration Building. Image © Jeff Dean Unity Temple. Image © Sean Marshall Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/57537089@N00/198494302/'>Flickr user gomattolson</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> + 25

Hudson Yards and Notre-Dame: A One-Two Punch of Megalomania

07:00 - 7 June, 2019
Hudson Yards and Notre-Dame: A One-Two Punch of Megalomania, Hudson Yards. Image © Related-Oxford
Hudson Yards. Image © Related-Oxford

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

In recent months, two events have done more harm to the “brand” of architecture in the public’s perception than anything I’ve experienced in the 40 years that I have been in the profession.

First, there was the grand opening of New York City’s Hudson Yards, a massive $20 billion development on Manhattan’s far west side. This first phase opened after seven years of construction and included an obligatory gathering of “world class” architects—Kohn Pedersen Fox, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, SOM, The Rockwell Group—as well a folly by designer Thomas Heatherwick.

What could possibly go wrong?

Andrés Jaque on Discovering the Different Dimensions of Architecture

06:15 - 7 June, 2019
Andrés Jaque on Discovering the Different Dimensions of Architecture, © Luca Chiaudano
© Luca Chiaudano

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

The goal of the series is to research these successful firms and attempt to understand their methods and approaches. By hopefully gaining a clearer picture of what it means to be an architect in the 21st century, the videos can also serve as inspiration for the next generation of up-and-coming architects and students as they enter the field.

Andrés Jaque is an architect, academic director, and author, who founded the international architecture firm Office for Political Innovation in 2003. Award-winning OFFPOLINN is based in New York and Madrid, and works on projects of different scales and media, intersecting design, research, and critical environmental practices. In parallel to his career as an architect, Jaque is the director of the Advanced Architectural Design Program at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, and a visiting professor at Princeton University and The Cooper Union. The architect is acknowledged for his transectional approach to architectural design, "practicing architecture as the intervention on complex composites of relationships, where its agency is negotiated with the agency unfold by other entities".

A Happily Tracked Day / Ying Long for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

04:00 - 7 June, 2019
A Happily Tracked Day / Ying Long for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019, The volunteer’s movement in daily scenes © Ying Long and Zhaoxi Zhang
The volunteer’s movement in daily scenes © Ying Long and Zhaoxi Zhang

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," Archdaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the “Eyes of the City” curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT. If you are interested in taking part in the exhibition at UABB 2019, submit your proposal to the “Eyes of the City” Open Call by May 31st, 2019: www.eyesofthecity.net

We live in a world full of electric products, and we have been influenced by them deeply, especially by those with digital screens, like cell phones, computers and TVs. We use computers for work and social media like Twitter and WeChat to connect with others, we use Mobike for short-distance commutes, Dianping to navigate us to a good lunch and then Alipay to pay the bill. At the end of a long day, we usually spend the rest of our time watching TV or playing online games in order to finally relax. These electric products bring convenience to our life, but at the same time, they are kidnapping it. The overuse of them immerses us in a virtual world and pushes people farther apart. We are losing face-to-face communication and ignoring the enjoyment of real life. Currently, people are spending more time on their mobile phones than ever before. According to a report published by Aier in 2018, the average screen time in China is 6 hours per day, and the average person uses their cellphone 108 times. This mobile-dependency is leaving our lives increasingly fragmented. 

The Beauty of Sea Salt Landscapes From Above

09:00 - 6 June, 2019
The Beauty of Sea Salt Landscapes From Above, © Tom Hegen
© Tom Hegen

Munich-based photographer Tom Hegen has published a set of aerial images capturing the beauty of sea salt production seen from above. The images, shot from a small airplane in Western Australia, demonstrate the impact of human intervention on natural environments, and depict how even seemingly rural landscapes are alive with the hyper-globalized demands of humankind.

© Tom Hegen © Tom Hegen © Tom Hegen © Tom Hegen + 12

Architect Transforms a Copenhagen Railway Depot into a Colorful Playground

07:00 - 6 June, 2019
Architect Transforms a Copenhagen Railway Depot into a Colorful Playground, © Illya Rastvorov
© Illya Rastvorov

The 2019 CANactions International Architecture Festival focused on an exploration of a notion of "Hromada" — Ukrainian name for the 'community', which is embedded into the country's historic and cultural codes and reflected in contemporary social movements and architectural forms.

Architect Illya Rastvorov is one of the winners of this year’s CANactions Youth Competition presented in Kyiv, Ukraine. For his proposal, the architect transformed the railroad depot of the Copenhagen Railway Station in Denmark into the “Copenhagen Playground”, a recreational area that caters to people of all ages and enhances the social conditions of the city.

© Illya Rastvorov © Illya Rastvorov © Illya Rastvorov © Illya Rastvorov + 7

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