1. ArchDaily
  2. Ecology

Ecology: The Latest Architecture and News

Eco-Capitalism and Architecture: Environmentally Friendly Materials and Technologies

There was a time when buildings wanted to be mountains, roofs wanted to be forests, and pillars wanted to be trees. As the world began to go into a state of alert with the melting of glaciers and the consequent rise of Earth’s temperature, architecture – from a general perspective – was concerned with imitating the shapes of nature. Something close to human-made “ecosystems”, seen by many as allegoric and decorative, in service of marketable images of “sustainable development”.

Eco-Capitalism and Architecture: Environmentally Friendly Materials and Technologies - SustainabilityEco-Capitalism and Architecture: Environmentally Friendly Materials and Technologies - SustainabilityEco-Capitalism and Architecture: Environmentally Friendly Materials and Technologies - SustainabilityEco-Capitalism and Architecture: Environmentally Friendly Materials and Technologies - SustainabilityEco-Capitalism and Architecture: Environmentally Friendly Materials and Technologies - More Images+ 2

The Main Problems in Landscape Design — And How to Avoid Them

Far beyond its decorative features, landscaping brings with it biological and cultural issues that need to be addressed in projects. However, what can be seen in most public, residential, condominium, commercial and business gardens is a series of approaches that distance landscaping from all its attributes, reducing it to a decorative layer in the construction. Next, we have put together strategies to avoid the main problems of landscape design, joining aesthetics with its environmental and cultural possibilities.

The Main Problems in Landscape Design — And How to Avoid Them - Image 1 of 4The Main Problems in Landscape Design — And How to Avoid Them - Image 2 of 4The Main Problems in Landscape Design — And How to Avoid Them - Image 3 of 4The Main Problems in Landscape Design — And How to Avoid Them - Image 4 of 4The Main Problems in Landscape Design — And How to Avoid Them - More Images+ 1

What Are Biomaterials in Architecture?

As part of the effort to make the construction sector more sustainable in the face of the climate crisis, the bioeconomy has stood out. While the road to net-zero architecture is still very complex, the emerging shift in culture and general thinking is evident, and innovation seems to be driving this transformation.

What Are Biomaterials in Architecture? - Image 1 of 4What Are Biomaterials in Architecture? - Image 2 of 4What Are Biomaterials in Architecture? - Image 3 of 4What Are Biomaterials in Architecture? - Image 4 of 4What Are Biomaterials in Architecture? - More Images+ 13

What Is Ecological Urbanism?

According to the architect and researcher Patrícia Akinaga, ecological urbanism emerged at the end of the 20th century as a strategy to create a paradigm shift with regard to the design of cities. With this, urban projects should be designed from the potential and limitations of existing natural resources. Unlike other previous movements, in ecological urbanism architecture is not the structuring element of the city — the landscape itself is. In other words, green areas should not only exist to beautify spaces, but as true engineering artifacts with the potential to dampen, retain and treat rainwater, for example. With ecological urbanism, urban design becomes defined by the natural elements intrinsic to its fabric.

What Is Ecological Urbanism? - Image 1 of 4What Is Ecological Urbanism? - Image 2 of 4What Is Ecological Urbanism? - Image 3 of 4What Is Ecological Urbanism? - Image 4 of 4What Is Ecological Urbanism? - More Images+ 3

What is Biomimetic Architecture?

What is Biomimetic Architecture? - Image 1 of 4What is Biomimetic Architecture? - Image 2 of 4What is Biomimetic Architecture? - Image 3 of 4What is Biomimetic Architecture? - Image 4 of 4What is Biomimetic Architecture? - More Images+ 3

In 1941, Swiss engineer George de Mestral was coming back from a hunting trip with his dog when he noticed that some seeds kept sticking to his clothes and his dog's fur. He observed that they contained several "hooks" that caught on anything with a loop, and from studying this plant, seven years later, he invented the hook and loop fastener, which he named Velcro.

What is Vernacular Architecture?

Vernacular architecture can be defined as a type of local or regional construction, using traditional materials and resources from the area where the building is located. Consequently, this architecture is closely related to its context and is aware of the specific geographic features and cultural aspects of its surroundings, being strongly influenced by them. For this reason, they are unique to different places in the world, becoming even a means of reaffirming an identity.

What is Vernacular Architecture? - Image 1 of 4What is Vernacular Architecture? - Image 2 of 4What is Vernacular Architecture? - Image 3 of 4What is Vernacular Architecture? - Image 4 of 4What is Vernacular Architecture? - More Images+ 4

Goldreed Industrial Design Award 2020 (1st edition)

GIDA 2020 - Goldreed Industrial Design Award - is the new international design award sponsored by the Xiongan Future Industrial Design Institute, with the aim of promoting at international level the concept of “harmony” applied to design.

Drawing from the scientific-technological progress and from the social changes that are currently happening in our society, GIDA aims at using design as a way to suggest new lifestyles, in order to contribute to the balanced development between human and nature.
The award sets for itself from the very beginning the objective of becoming a major reference in the international design field, by providing a

Participants Call for MEDS Silesia 2020

The 11th edition of MEDS workshop, held in the industrial region of Poland - Silesia, is now open for entries! Apply as a participant up to the 21st of March.

MEDS Workshop
“Meetings of Design Students” is an international workshop organized each summer in a different country. Every year it gathers around 200 participants associated with various fields of art, design, and architecture. In a span of two weeks, guided by experienced tutors, the participants create and construct group projects, getting in touch with different approaches to design and mastering their skills in a wide range of building techniques. Each project combines

NLÉ MFS IIIx3 Prototype Launched in China Explores Ecological Intelligence

As part of a collaboration between the Centre Pompidou and the Mao Jihong Arts Foundation, the Cosmopolis #1.5: 'Enlarged Intelligence' exhibition features the developments of NLÉ Makoko Floating School. The Minjiang Floating System (MFS IIIx3), the fourth prototype and the third iteration of the prefabricated self-built system for water, investigates methods to counter the challenges posed by urbanization and climate change.

Earlier prototypes of the Makoko Floating School include the Waterfront Atlas (MFS II) launched in Venice, Italy and the Minne Floating School (MFS III) in Bruges, Belgium. The project, initially developed for the water in Lagos, is now usable in all these sites including the Jincheng Lake in Chengdu.

NLÉ MFS IIIx3 Prototype Launched in China Explores Ecological Intelligence  - CityscapeNLÉ MFS IIIx3 Prototype Launched in China Explores Ecological Intelligence  - Image 2 of 4NLÉ MFS IIIx3 Prototype Launched in China Explores Ecological Intelligence  - Image 3 of 4NLÉ MFS IIIx3 Prototype Launched in China Explores Ecological Intelligence  - CityscapeNLÉ MFS IIIx3 Prototype Launched in China Explores Ecological Intelligence  - More Images+ 1

How to Make Earth Plaster in 5 Easy-to-Follow Steps

The use of earth plaster is very common in natural buildings; it is the same mixture used in adobe. Though easily made, its use is not widely known. Rafael Loschiavo, from Ecoeficientes, teaches the step-by-step method for bringing a new life to a run-down wall without the need for major renovations.

Call for submissions: International FINSA Award

Finsa launches its competition for students of Architecture and Design for the second time.

For this year's competition, the interaction between children and the elderly is the new focus.

Call for Entries: Exhibition - Competitions, XV World Triennial of Architecture “Interarch 2018”

One of the most important architecture events in 2018 for the architectural society. Open international forum with professional participation of architects and students from all over the world, profiling a panorama of the tendencies and achievements of contemporary world architecture. Participants will discuss the topic “Sustainable Architecture for Sustainable World”, exchange ideas with leading masters of world contemporary architecture and take part in the different sections of “Interarch 2018."

Behind India's Ambitious Plan to Create the World's Longest River

Against the backdrop of an ever-increasing number of its farmers committing suicides, and its cities crumbling under intensifying pressure on their water resources—owing to their rapidly growing populations—India has revived its incredibly ambitious Interlinking of Rivers (ILR) project which aims to create a nation-wide water-grid twice the length of the Nile. The $168 billion project, first envisioned almost four decades ago, entails the linkage of thirty-seven of the country’s rivers through the construction of thirty canals and three-thousand water reservoirs. The chief objective is to address India’s regional inequity in water availability: 174 billion cubic meters of water is proposed to be transported across river basins, from potentially water-surplus to water-deficit areas.

The project is presented by the Indian government as the only realistic means to increase the country’s irrigation potential and per-capita water storage capacity. However, it raises ecological concerns of gargantuan proportions: 104,000 hectares of forest land will be affected, leading to the desecration of natural ecosystems. Experts in hydrology also question the scientific basis of treating rivers as “mere conduits of water.” Furthermore, the fear of large-scale involuntary human displacement—an estimated 1.5 million people—likely to be caused by the formation of water reservoirs is starting to materialize into a popular uprising.

"Knowledge, Wisdom, and Understanding" by Julien Lanoo

Architectural photographer Julien Lanoo is known for his storytelling. His documentary-style photographs of the built environment range from Adjaye Associates' Aishti Foundation, OMA’s CCTV and the Oslo Architecture Triennale to name a few. Now the photographer has released a short film: introducing Canadian-Ghanaian architect Akwasi McLaren as he tells the story behind building his eco-lodge in the Cape 3 Points region of Ghana. Broken down into 3 chapters, “Knowledge, Wisdom, and Understanding” follows McLaren’s journey from designing his parents’ hotel in Ghana as a student to building his beloved lodge on the beach, to his hopes of sharing the valuable skills of ecological building and craftsmanship to cities.